Lets Learn Japanese

theMightyME

Owner of The Total Screen
#1
so we created a group on duolingo to help eachother learn japanese, but I thought it might be nice to create a thread so we can share knowledge outside of the app and help eahcother out...

I thought of a few things I could add... a pronunciation guide, an explanation of particles, quick graphs with all the hiragana and katakana, a small explanation about particles.... stuff that can give what people are learning on duolingo a little more context

I'll add some of that stuff later....

first things first.. here is the duolingo group
NBTAFV

we have 12 remaining slots.. but even if you can't join that club you can share with us here...

the group is for learning to play monster hunter in japanese, but I don't play mh and am just trying to improve my japanese, so if youa re in the same boat, come join us...

now... for the first thing I can help with...

pronunciation

japanese is a phonetic language in which every syllable occupies the same length of time, but can use different tones to stress... I am not going to go that deep here though... instead I am going to go over the vowel sounds.. as they are universal

a - is pronounced ah like the a in father
e - is pronounced eh like the e in bed
i - is pronounced E like the i in ski
o - is pronounced oh like the Os in Bow and Arrow
u - is pronounced oo like the u in que

kana characters (hiragana for japanese words, katakana for foreign loan words or for emphasis) are represented in romaji (roman characters... our alphabet) as simple chunks of letters, from 1 to 3 letters long... usually a consonant followed by a vowel... though n is sometimes on its own, as are all of the vowels...

there are 3, 3 letter romaji sylables as well... chi, shi, and tsu

with this knowledge you should be able to pronounce most things in japanese, though you might not stress the right syllable in a word... and there are a few times in which an i or u can be mostly silent...

for example in the anime Naruto the characetrs Naruto, Sasuke, and Sakura all have those near silent Us in their names... so though phonetically you would think naruto = naw-roo-toe... the u is kind of silent so it ends up sounding almost like gnarl-toe (Rs, by the way often sound like Ls, and Ns can sound like Ms on occasion... but don't focus too much on that)

so...

Naruto - kind of like Gnarl-Toe (with a very short l sound in the rl)
Sakura - kind of like Sock-Raw
Sasuke - kind of like Sauce-K

next time I will write something about double consonants and turning chi into cha, cho, chu, and che with mini characters (something you see in duolingo fairly early on, but which is never explained to you)

then after that maybe a brief explanation of the way particles are used to structure sentences

all of which should help with the duolingo lessons
 

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
#3
Ignore op, this is the REAL starter's guide to nihongo ("japanese" for all you baka gaijin (means "stupid foreigners")):

 

Odo

Well-Known Member
#5
I studied Japanese for some time, but I had to give up. To sum it up, I forgot everything after 2 years. Never looked back. It was fun, though. I could speak a little and sit a proficiency test and did well back then. Not anymore.

Genzai boku wa nihongo ga wakarimasen.

If you want to learn it, you need to find ways to use it.
 

theMightyME

Owner of The Total Screen
#9
Wonder how useful this'll be in MHXX terms, since I would assume all that stuff is kanji. Hmmmmmmmm
You can't write Japanese with only Kanji... The sentence structure needs kana... Like if i was to write "Fried's theory about Japanese" i would need at least 2 particles which are written as kana... Knowing kana and particles alone can tell you a lot about a Japanese sentence... The particle "no" states ownership... So the anime Boku no Hero Academia translates to my hero academia... Boku being I and no making the I possessive of the subject... The hero academia...

Another example is if you see the "to" character between a lot of a Kanji characters or acts like a comma in a list like "Fried to Juegos to ET to Mighty" is translated like "Fried, Juegos, ET, and Mighty"

Particles are always in hiragana...

ALSO, katakana is almost exclusively used for foreign borrow words... Typically English words... The word America wouldn't be written in kanji, but rather in katakana like "a-me-ri-ka"...

So you can actually figure out a lot without knowing any kanji... But the duolingo app does teach kanji too... And i might add some lessons related to that as well... Like stroke order and count, which can teach you how to look up kanji you don't know
 
#10
Great thread! :)

Fortunately for an Spanish speaker the romaji pronunciation of the syllables is pretty easy -except some j, y and tsu sounds, so not to worried about that. For me the most difficult bit, aside of kanji, is the organization of the sentences, the particles like Wa, Ga, Ho, that vary quite often with specific rules and the counters, they used to drive me crazy.

Studied on my own Japanese for 6 months or so 4 years ago, managed to learn katakana/hiragana and few kanjis and then stopped. Now I'm trying to start again to my (not)surprise have forgotten everything haha.

What's the name of the Duolingo group?

I used to frequent this websites for reference, in case someone finds them useful:

http://www.tofugu.com/learn-japanese/

http://a1.marugotoweb.jp/

Cheerio!
 

theMightyME

Owner of The Total Screen
#11
Great thread! :)

Fortunately for an Spanish speaker the romaji pronunciation of the syllables is pretty easy -except some j, y and tsu sounds, so not to worried about that. For me the most difficult bit, aside of kanji, is the organization of the sentences, the particles like Wa, Ga, Ho, that vary quite often with specific rules and the counters, they used to drive me crazy.

Studied on my own Japanese for 6 months or so 4 years ago, managed to learn katakana/hiragana and few kanjis and then stopped. Now I'm trying to start again to my (not)surprise have forgotten everything haha.

What's the name of the Duolingo group?

I used to frequent this websites for reference, in case someone finds them useful:

http://www.tofugu.com/learn-japanese/

http://a1.marugotoweb.jp/

Cheerio!
here is the code for the duolingo group
NBTAFV

particles are tricky, but the basic particles as they are used in sentence structure are super helpful.... wa/ha, wo/o, to, no, ga, ka... all of those are super super helpful... then you start getting into the more complex particles and particle rules and it is a nightmare lol
 
#12
here is the code for the duolingo group
NBTAFV

particles are tricky, but the basic particles as they are used in sentence structure are super helpful.... wa/ha, wo/o, to, no, ga, ka... all of those are super super helpful... then you start getting into the more complex particles and particle rules and it is a nightmare lol
Brilliant, thanks! :)
 
#14
@Jajeongeo Welcome to TNE! Just fyi, there's a little bug that makes new users sometimes not be able to use an avatar or set a signature, but I've fixed that for you so you should be able to do that now.

If you need any mod-related help, just hit me, @mattavelle1, @FriedShoes, or @EvilTw1n up.
Thank you very much! Will use an avatar right away, was wondering whether I needed to post more times haha.

Hopefully I won't need any moderation aside of joy and knowledge -memes- shared :D
 
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#19
My Monster Hunter XX arrives tomorrow.
Been at this for over a month it seems. Its neat. I havent been able to put it into too much practice, though. I'm able to read some rare tweets in my timeline now, but rarely do I get the full context of much even if I "sound it out". But its been useful. I'm a fairly prolific collector, uploader and organizer of a certain form of high-art Japanese medium (porn) and oftentimes cast lists are missing or unfindable. Being able to make out some of these runes and use these ears of mine has pretty much solved that problem. Been able to ID some gems and cure a lot of my OCD.
 
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