Making a giant list of movies I need to see

theMightyME

Owner of The Total Screen
#1
started makign a list of movies I want to see, msot I have never seen, some are movies I saw when I was too young to understand them

looking for some recommendations... would take too long to list all of the movies I have seen, so just throw some ideas out if you want...

*I have seen like half the films in the satoshi kon thing, but I want to marathon them*

here is my list so far
--------------------------------------

cinema paradisio

citizen Kane

ran

Lawrence of Arabia

all quiet on the western front

to kill a mockingbird

12 angry men

the godfather trilogy

bonnie and clyde

sid and nancy

the day the earth stood still

bladerunner

chinatown

the good the bad and the ugly

annie hall

the graduate

on the waterfront

sunset blvd

the bridge on the river kwai

letters from iwo jima

one flew over the cuckoo's nest

the grapes of wrath

apocalypse now

rear window

amadeus

network

the searchers

satoshi kon marathon
-perfect blue
-millenium actress
-tokyo godfathers
-paprika
-Ani*Kuri15 episode 15 "good morning"
-dreaming machine (unreleased)
-paranoia agent (13 episodes)

kubrick completion
-barry lyndon
-day of the flight
-flying padre
-fear and desire
-the seafarers
-killer's kiss
-the killing
-paths of glory
-spartacus
-lolita
-dr. strangeglove

coen bros. completion
-blood simple
-barton fink
-intolerable cruelty
-the ladykillers
-Inside Llewyn Davis (2013)

sam raimi completion
-crimewave
-the great and powerfull oz (2013)

jeunet completion
-macmacs
-the young and prodigious spivet (2013)
 

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
#2
Mamoru Oshii's Avalon. It's particularly great because you're a hardassed gamer.

Nevermind the score it has there, it's a very interesting film. Once again, more so because you're a gamer, which I'm willing to bet most of the reviewers aren't, necessarily.
 

theMightyME

Owner of The Total Screen
#4
"Superfakerbros" wrote: Have you ever seen Lord of the Rings or The Hobbit or Django?
yes, yes, no
I want to see django but I hate going to the movies alone and I am unsure I have anyone to go with.... most of my friends who would like it have already seen it, so my only hope is if one of them wants to see it again... otherwise I have to wait til its on cable or something
 

Superfakerbros

ECE 2018
Moderator
#5
"thMightyME" wrote: I want to see django but I hate going to the movies alone and I am unsure I have anyone to go with.... most of my friends who would like it have already seen it, so my only hope is if one of them wants to see it again... otherwise I have to wait til its on cable or something
Maybe if you tell them that you'll pay for all of the tickets, drinks, and snacks, they'll come. I remember watching the Avengers twice because of my friend didn't want to watch it alone.
 

theMightyME

Owner of The Total Screen
#6
"Acesonnall" wrote: Top Quality Movies You May Or May Not Have Already Seen:

Star Wars Saga - seen
Ip Man -not seen
Ip Man 2 - not seen
Ironclad - not seen
Lockout - seen
13 Assassins - not seen
War of the Arrows - not seen
No Strings Attached - not seen, no itnerest
Jet Li's Fearless - seen
Ong-Bak: The Thai Warrior - seen
Ong Bak 2: The Beginning - seen
Ong Bak 3 - seen
My Way - not seen
Batman Begins - seen
The Dark Knight - seen
The Dark Knight Rises - seen
Ratatouille - seen some of it, not interested, not a fan of most pixar stuff
Independence Day - seen
Back to the Future - seen
Harry Potter Saga - seen
Indiana Jones - seen
The Man from Nowhere - not seen
Indie Game: The Movie - seen
Men in Black - seen
Men in Black II (Watch the 3rd one too, but I haven't seen it) - seen, no interest in the 3rd
Red Cliff: Theatrical Version - not seen
Shaolin - not seen
Shrek Movies - seen some of them, don't care about the rest
The Day After Tomorrow - seen
X-Men Movies - seen
I, Robot - seen
Iron Man 1 - seen
Iron Man 2 - seen
The Sixth Sense - seen
Terminator Movies - seen
The Incredibles - seen
Super 8 - seen
The Mummy - seen
The Mummy Returns - no interest
Spider-Man Movies - seen (all but the most recent, will see it on cable eventually)
Braveheart - seen
Pirates of The Caribbean 1, 2, and 3 - seen
Thor - seen
Dirty Dancing - seen
Rush Hour 1, 2, and 3 - seen
WALL-E - not seen
Batman (1989) - seen
I Am Legend - seen
Legend of the Fist: Return of Chen Zhen - not seen
Inception - seen
Home Alone 1, 2, and 3 - seen
Radio - seen
Up - seen
The Pursuit of Happyness - seen
Forrest Gump - seen
The Curious Case of Benjamin Button - seen
E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial - seen
Catch Me If You Can - seen
The Da Vinci Code - seen
Captain America: The First Avenger - seen
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory -seen
Limitless - seen
Top Gun - seen
Flash Point - not seen
National Treasure - seen
Bodyguards and Assassins - not seen
most of those I am not really into, or aren't really what I am looking for... I am looking more for film classics, though I might add some of those hong kong flicks
 

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
#9
"thMightyME" wrote:
"juegosmajicos" wrote:
Have you seen Wong Kar Wai's movies? I've seen most of his films and could recommend all of them, but these are the ones I'd really throw at you to watch immediately: In the Mood for Love, Chungking Express, and 2046.
I've seen some of them... I really fell in love with "fallen angels" when it came out
I haven't seen that one, it's been sitting in my queue for years. I need to go on a movie binge soon, it's been a long time.
 

theMightyME

Owner of The Total Screen
#10
"Acesonnall" wrote: Luckily for you, all of those foreign movies I listed are on Netflix so if you wanted to do a 30 Day free trial and watch all of those, you could.
no need.. I have teh netflix..... considering getting hulu plus as well, but with half the stuff being free anyways I would mostly be paying for the ability to use it on my wii u and evo, not sure if its worth it.... also considerign crunchyroll... if they get a wii u app
 

MANGANian

Megalomaniacal Robo-Zombie
#12
Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind- starring Jim Carrey in a perfectly done non-comedic role. Just a warning though: do not watch this show when you're drunk. Critically acclaimed. That is all.

Source Code- a fantastic show that I felt got overlooked. It garnered good reviews nonetheless.

Pan's Labyrinth- directed by Guillermo del Toro. I bought this show at the age of 14, and although the store clerk was usually vigilant in keeping anything that's not under PG13 away from me, he gave it to me anyway. I initially thought this was a kids show... I was wrong (it was rated R). One scene in particular got to me. It was so skin-crawling. Anyway, if you haven't seen it yet, get it immediately! This movie is just pure gold! And the critics also agrees.
 

theMightyME

Owner of The Total Screen
#13
"MANGANian" wrote: Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind- starring Jim Carrey in a perfectly done non-comedic role. Just a warning though: do not watch this show when you're drunk. Critically acclaimed. That is all.

Source Code- a fantastic show that I felt got overlooked. It garnered good reviews nonetheless.

Pan's Labyrinth- directed by Guillermo del Toro. I bought this show at the age of 14, and although the store clerk was usually vigilant in keeping anything that's not under PG13 away from me, he gave it to me anyway. I initially thought this was a kids show... I was wrong (it was rated R). One scene in particular got to me. It was so skin-crawling. Anyway, if you haven't seen it yet, get it immediately! This movie is just pure gold! And the critics also agrees.
seen all 3, and others by the directors
 

AniGamer

TNE Clan Owner
#15
I can suggest a few good movies I've seen recently.

- Pan's Labyrinth (Amazing movie to say the least!)

- Courageous (Fantastic film, expecially for those who are fathers!)

- LEGO Star Wars: The Padawan Menace (Looks excellent on Blu-Ray, very action-packed and comedic.)

- October Baby

- Grace Card

- Left Behind 1 & 2

- Pokemon: Kyurem Vs. The Sword of Justice

- Bleach: Hell Verse

-
 
#16
Here are movies by select directors that I like, and I hope you come to enjoy them as well:

Samuel Fuller
  • Pickup At South Street
  • Shock Corridor
  • White DogAkira Kurosawa
    • High and Low
    • Drunken Angel
    • Seven Samurai
    • Ran
    • Yojimbo
    • SanjuroMartin Scorsese
      • Raging Bull
      • Mean Streets
      • Who's That Knocking On My Door
      • The Departed
        Werner Herzog
        • Grizzly Man
        • Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New OrleansAguirre: The Wrath of GodEncounters at the End of the EarthCave of Forgotten DreamsDavid Lynch
          Blue VelvetEraserheadElephant Man
        Sergio Corbucci
        DjangoNavajo JoeVamos A Matar Compeneros!
      Henri Georges Cluzot
      Le Corbeau
      Les DiaboliquesWages of Fear
    Alejandro Gonzalez Inaritu
    Amorres Perros21 GramsBabel
 

EvilTw1n

Even my henchmen think I'm crazy.
Moderator
#17
On a slightly different note, if you enjoy paying attention to films visually (appreciating the way they're shot, framed and lit), track down movies where Conrad L. Hall did the cinematography. Road to Perdition was his last film; it's a genre gangster film, but worth it for how he frames those shots.

The same goes for Roger Deakins. His most notable recent stuff is working with the Coen brothers (No Country for Old Men, True Grit) and making Skyfall look better than any Bond movie I can remember.
 
#19
On a slightly different note, if you enjoy paying attention to films visually (appreciating the way they're shot, framed and lit), track down movies where Conrad L. Hall did the cinematography. Road to Perdition was his last film; it's a genre gangster film, but worth it for how he frames those shots.

The same goes for Roger Deakins. His most notable recent stuff is working with the Coen brothers (No Country for Old Men, True Grit) and making Skyfall look better than any Bond movie I can remember.
Roger Deakins is one of my favorite cinematographers and Skyfall looked absolutely gorgeous. O Brother Where Art Thou is one of my favorite films by the Coens' direction and Deakins photography.

I haven't seen Road to Perdition in a long while, but the overexposed lighting in that one scene gave a really strong impression on me.

I would recommend the Colors Trilogy -- Three Colors: White, Three Colors: Blue, Three Color: Red -- by Krzysztof Kieślowski. All of them have meticulously shot images with hues eponymous to their titles to portray a recurring theme. Beautiful stuff.
 

EvilTw1n

Even my henchmen think I'm crazy.
Moderator
#20
^
No lie, I've probably watched Skyfall 7 or 8 times at home on DVD, purely because of just how amazing it looks. It's a good Bond movie, don't get me wrong, but what sets it up as one of the best in the series comes down to that cinematography.

Is Colors Trilogy on Netflix?
 
#21
^
No lie, I've probably watched Skyfall 7 or 8 times at home on DVD, purely because of just how amazing it looks. It's a good Bond movie, don't get me wrong, but what sets it up as one of the best in the series comes down to that cinematography.

Is Colors Trilogy on Netflix?
Criterion Collection has the rights to it, so you're not likely to find it on Netflix, but Hulu instead. Definitely be on the lookout on Criterion's Facebook page because they announce Free-mium weekends from time to time.

There are a couple of Criterion movies that are on Netflix like Alphaville by Jean Luc Godard, or Secret Sunshine by Lee Chang-Dong. They are also excellent films.
 

GaemzDood

Well-Known Member
#23
Watch Fritz Lang's films, especially M & Metropolis. I'd also recommend Vertigo, which I believe beat Citizen Kane on the film critics' latest all time best films list. You should also watch Pedro Almodovar's films; specifically All About My Mother, Bad Education, Talk to Her, & Matador.

For car chase films, watch The French Connection. Best one in the genre.
 
#24
I'll compile a list of recommendations later. I just wanted to ask what don't you like about Pixar movies? It's not often you see someone who's against Pixar in any sense, so I'm genuinely curious.
 

theMightyME

Owner of The Total Screen
#25
I'll compile a list of recommendations later. I just wanted to ask what don't you like about Pixar movies? It's not often you see someone who's against Pixar in any sense, so I'm genuinely curious.
I wasn't a child when toy story came out... I think theya re WAY overrated.. I DO like some pixar movies... but I just don't think they are mind-blowing or anything... they are just decent kids films with high production values... I really liked UP, especially the begging... but that beign BY FAR my favorite movie of theirs still wasn't as good as most made it out to be....

as an anime fan I look at the works of somebody like satoshi kon.. and then see pixar get oscar nod after oscar nod and it just seems like a bad joke to me

I also think steven speilberg is vastly overrated in a world that has had SOOOOO many better directors
 
#26
I'll compile a list of recommendations later. I just wanted to ask what don't you like about Pixar movies? It's not often you see someone who's against Pixar in any sense, so I'm genuinely curious.
I wasn't a child when toy story came out... I think theya re WAY overrated.. I DO like some pixar movies... but I just don't think they are mind-blowing or anything... they are just decent kids films with high production values... I really liked UP, especially the begging... but that beign BY FAR my favorite movie of theirs still wasn't as good as most made it out to be....

as an anime fan I look at the works of somebody like satoshi kon.. and then see pixar get oscar nod after oscar nod and it just seems like a bad joke to me

I also think steven speilberg is vastly overrated in a world that has had SOOOOO many better directors
I definitely agree with your bit on Spielberg -- he's a versatile director and makes very good movies without question; but his films aren't as thematically interesting as say, Coens', Scorsese's, Kurosawa's, or Scott's. If you ever have the time to check out at least one of these filmmakers, I hope you have fun watching their movies. I made a post earlier with a list of films and filmmakers that you can check out :)

I noticed you're not too big a fan of a fan on Pixar, but you have not seen Wall-E yet. Definitely give it a chance if you're up for it. While it's definitely a children's film at the end of the day, it should have enough elements to keep you entertained, both visually and thematically. And you didn't like Ratatouille, for shame :p! But at least you like Satoshi Kon movies, so I may forgive you... may... :p

If you like animation, I can list some films you may like:

Persepolis
Waltz in Bashir
A Cat in Paris
Please Say Something
Chico and Rita
American Pop
Fantastic Planet
Fantastic Mr. Fox
 

EvilTw1n

Even my henchmen think I'm crazy.
Moderator
#27
^I'm with you on Wall-E and Ratatouille. Two of my Pixar favs. TBH, I think they hit their apex with Wall-E. Nothing has been as good since.

Back onto the cinematography kick, I was walking through Five-Below today, looking for cheap gaming shirts. Instead, I found a cheap DVD of "The American." I'd been wanting to watch it for the longest time, but it never showed up on Netflix, and I'm not paying $20 for it at Wal-Mart or Target. They must be doing a firesale on this particular DVD, because I see it's also $5 on Amazon right now. So I popped it in, with some Boston Lager at my side.

Daaaaaaaaamn. Anton Corbijn (the director) does a lot of photography himself, but I'd never heard of Martin Ruhe (the cinematographer). These two are absolutely lethal together. This movie is told almost entirely with visuals. There's very little dialog. And this is old-school camera work; the camera only moves when it really
has to. And purely by that metric, this thing is a master class. It's no wonder it wasn't a huge hit, because it's one step removed from being a silent movie. But it's right up my alley. As much as I admire run 'n gun cinema, I've been taken much more by camera work that actually frames each scene.
 

repomech

resident remnant robot relic
#28

I'll compile a list of recommendations later. I just wanted to ask what don't you like about Pixar movies? It's not often you see someone who's against Pixar in any sense, so I'm genuinely curious.

I wasn't a child when toy story came out... I think theya re WAY overrated.. I DO like some pixar movies... but I just don't think they are mind-blowing or anything... they are just decent kids films with high production values... I really liked UP, especially the begging... but that beign BY FAR my favorite movie of theirs still wasn't as good as most made it out to be....

as an anime fan I look at the works of somebody like satoshi kon.. and then see pixar get oscar nod after oscar nod and it just seems like a bad joke to me

I also think steven speilberg is vastly overrated in a world that has had SOOOOO many better directors
I definitely agree with your bit on Spielberg -- he's a versatile director and makes very good movies without question; but his films aren't as thematically interesting as say, Coens', Scorsese's, Kurosawa's, or Scott's. If you ever have the time to check out at least one of these filmmakers, I hope you have fun watching their movies. I made a post earlier with a list of films and filmmakers that you can check out :)

I noticed you're not too big a fan of a fan on Pixar, but you have not seen Wall-E yet. Definitely give it a chance if you're up for it. While it's definitely a children's film at the end of the day, it should have enough elements to keep you entertained, both visually and thematically. And you didn't like Ratatouille, for shame :p! But at least you like Satoshi Kon movies, so I may forgive you... may... :p

If you like animation, I can list some films you may like:

Persepolis
Waltz in Bashir
A Cat in Paris
Please Say Something
Chico and Rita
American Pop
Fantastic Planet
Fantastic Mr. Fox
I've been meaning to see the animated version of Persepolis, the graphic novel was excellent. I grew up around a number of people who came from secular leftist families from Iran that had had to go into exile once the Islamist theocracy consolidated and violently repressed the secular wing of the anti-Shah revolution, so it was a very familiar story that has many real life faces to it for me, I'm glad someone chose to share it in these formats.

Btw - just looking at your recommendations - you weren't by chance a film student? It's not every day in the 2010's that someone recommends Godard.
 

theMightyME

Owner of The Total Screen
#30
Well, Steven Soderbergh has made some waves with this speech.

Agree? Disagree?
I couldn't read all of that.... is there an audiobook?

what I gathered from what I glimpsed is that
1. we are more invested in fiction than reality
2. we consume violence without narrative

the way I feel is thta movies are art, but they are more than just art, they are also entertainment, and in a sense they are therapy... the same goes for video games...I would never judge somebodyw atching strung together action scenes... perhaps the fast pace and aggression alleviates the stresses of flying in the same way as I listen to the most aggressive death metal I have when riding the bus to alleviate my crippling social anxiety (that I am now on medication and undergoing therapy for)

as for the outrage of real events like the stoning of a teenage girl.... there is SOOOOOOOOO much wrong with this world, we have to pick our battles or we will be buried under a mountain of depression and anxiety... as cols as it sounds.. there are atrocities we have to ignore in order to function and progress, we naturally turn our gaze upon issues that connect with us, and when we reach our fill we start to turn a blind eye to everything else

people like Soderbergh have the great benefit of having a job that is creatively and emotionally fulfilling while alsogiving him financial success... so it is easy to say that we should be watching better movies and not turning off our brains when you work that kind of job, compared to people who hate their job and struggle to get by... it is easy to take up causes and open your heart to more concerns when you are faced with less concerns yourself and given the opportunity to vent your personal concerns to others creatively...
 

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
#31
This thread hasn't been bumped in forever, but it must make a comeback.
Have you seen the Redline animation, MightyMe? It's amazing. Worth watching for the hand-drawn animation alone, if not for the fantastic classic hero-gets-the-girl story turned up to 11. I'll post the trailer, but I would recommend you just go into the movie without seeing anything about it. Just know that it goes with all of my recommendations -- if you don't go in expecting to get any introspection out of it.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2t26m_Q6ENo
It is pretty much the result of the strongest love for Anime as a craft, not as an art, if that makes sense.
 

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
#32
Well, Steven Soderbergh has made some waves with this speech.

Agree? Disagree?

I read the whole thing just now. He rambles a lot, jesus. But there's this quote:

In 2003, 455 films were released. 275 of those were independent, 180 were studio films. Last year 677 films were released. So you’re not imagining things, there are a lot of movies that open every weekend. 549 of those were independent, 128 were studio films. So, a 100% increase in independent films, and a 28% drop in studio films, and yet, ten years ago: Studio market share 69%, last year 76%. You’ve got fewer studio movies now taking up a bigger piece of the pie and you’ve got twice as many independent films scrambling for a smaller piece of the pie. That’s hard. That’s really hard.
I would interpret that simply as people spending time and money on theatrical releases only for big movies, because they rather watch the smaller stuff through Netflix or some such service. That's what I've noticed in myself, and in my group of friends, at least. It's all about the convenience; for independent movies to reach more people, they have to align with the modern consumer instead of relying on the ancient model of theatrical releases. If I was given the choice of watching a movie like Moon on its release date on a movie theater, where the ticket, popcorn, and soda are going to run me $20+ easily, or from the comfort of my own home through a cheap service like Netflix where my friends and I are actually able to talk and drink during the movie, then the second is always going to be my choice.


As far as the foreign market, in cases where internet and such streaming video services are not easily available, all you have to take into account are the increasing ticket prices. Higher prices means people are less willing to spend their money to watch an independent movie whose quality they've heard little or nothing about.
 
#33
Here are a few more films:

  • Akira[*]Amelié[*]American Splendour[*]Belleville Rendez-Vous[*]Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind[*]Garden State[*]Ghost in the Shell[*]Ghost in the Shell 2: InnocenceHigh FidelityJackie BrownThe MatrixPan's LabyrinthPersepolisPulp FictionReservoir DogsStudio Ghibli Films
 
#34
This thread hasn't been bumped in forever, but it must make a comeback.
Have you seen the Redline animation, MightyMe? It's amazing. Worth watching for the hand-drawn animation alone, if not for the fantastic classic hero-gets-the-girl story turned up to 11. I'll post the trailer, but I would recommend you just go into the movie without seeing anything about it. Just know that it goes with all of my recommendations -- if you don't go in expecting to get any introspection out of it.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2t26m_Q6ENo
It is pretty much the result of the strongest love for Anime as a craft, not as an art, if that makes sense.
Man Redline is such a great movie. It seems to be that revival of unapologetic and pull-no-punches types of anime in a generation where there are less adventurous and experimental types of anime. Though I'm not sure if I understand your "strongest love for anime as a craft, not as an art" comment. Are you implying that it was the core production values (i.e. animation, direction, sound design, etc.) that made it great, as opposed to the visuals and art style?

Just want to know.
 

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
#35
This thread hasn't been bumped in forever, but it must make a comeback.
Have you seen the Redline animation, MightyMe? It's amazing. Worth watching for the hand-drawn animation alone, if not for the fantastic classic hero-gets-the-girl story turned up to 11. I'll post the trailer, but I would recommend you just go into the movie without seeing anything about it. Just know that it goes with all of my recommendations -- if you don't go in expecting to get any introspection out of it.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2t26m_Q6ENo
It is pretty much the result of the strongest love for Anime as a craft, not as an art, if that makes sense.
Man Redline is such a great movie. It seems to be that revival of unapologetic and pull-no-punches types of anime in a generation where there are less adventurous and experimental types of anime. Though I'm not sure if I understand your "strongest love for anime as a craft, not as an art" comment. Are you implying that it was the core production values (i.e. animation, direction, sound design, etc.) that made it great, as opposed to the visuals and art style?

Just want to know.
I meant more in the "well-made" versus "meaningful or insightful" sense. Everything in the movie that pertains to the artists, writers, music composers, producers, and so on, was extremely skillful, yet the movie doesn't offer any kind of discussion on any topic that is going to make any person think about their life or empathize more with others, or anything of the sort. I'm not slighting it for that, I think it's among the best movies made with that intent. It's like the authors are tapped into the cultural mainline and made something deeply and densely "fun", but weren't interested at all in inserting any social commentary or whatever; Or maybe there is some social commentary somewhere in there, and I'm just distracted by how badass everything is to even notice.
I don't think there's anything wrong with the movie, to be honest.
 

EvilTw1n

Even my henchmen think I'm crazy.
Moderator
#36
I would interpret that simply as people spending time and money on theatrical releases only for big movies, because they rather watch the smaller stuff through Netflix or some such service. That's what I've noticed in myself, and in my group of friends, at least. It's all about the convenience; for independent movies to reach more people, they have to align with the modern consumer instead of relying on the ancient model of theatrical releases. If I was given the choice of watching a movie like Moon on its release date on a movie theater, where the ticket, popcorn, and soda are going to run me $20+ easily, or from the comfort of my own home through a cheap service like Netflix where my friends and I are actually able to talk and drink during the movie, then the second is always going to be my choice.
That's a very good point. IIRC, before he died, Ebert had said something about how irreplaceable the experience is of going to a movie. For some movies, maybe that's true (I do long to see SkyFall's cinematography on a gigantic screen again). But for indies? I'm with you. I'd rather watch many of those films at home on Netflix. The model for independent film making has to change like anything else.

Perhaps it's a generational thing. Our generation seems much more amenable to the idea of cinema on a big TV in our homes, for the most part.
 

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
#37
I would interpret that simply as people spending time and money on theatrical releases only for big movies, because they rather watch the smaller stuff through Netflix or some such service. That's what I've noticed in myself, and in my group of friends, at least. It's all about the convenience; for independent movies to reach more people, they have to align with the modern consumer instead of relying on the ancient model of theatrical releases. If I was given the choice of watching a movie like Moon on its release date on a movie theater, where the ticket, popcorn, and soda are going to run me $20+ easily, or from the comfort of my own home through a cheap service like Netflix where my friends and I are actually able to talk and drink during the movie, then the second is always going to be my choice.
That's a very good point. IIRC, before he died, Ebert had said something about how irreplaceable the experience is of going to a movie. For some movies, maybe that's true (I do long to see SkyFall's cinematography on a gigantic screen again). But for indies? I'm with you. I'd rather watch many of those films at home on Netflix. The model for independent film making has to change like anything else.

Perhaps it's a generational thing. Our generation seems much more amenable to the idea of cinema on a big TV in our homes, for the most part.
I do think there's something really awesome about going to the theater, but it's something that pretty much only the biggest movies provide: 3D, 48fps, IMAX, the works. When it comes to the social aspect, I do think watching a movie at somebody's home while drinking your preferred alcohol or eating whatever meal is the better social experience.
 

EvilTw1n

Even my henchmen think I'm crazy.
Moderator
#40
I do think there's something really awesome about going to the theater, but it's something that pretty much only the biggest movies provide: 3D, 48fps, IMAX, the works. When it comes to the social aspect, I do think watching a movie at somebody's home while drinking your preferred alcohol or eating whatever meal is the better social experience.
Yeah, that's why summer blockbusters continue to bring in the ridiculous cash. They offer something you can't get at home, whereas it's the opposite for something you can watch at home like "In Bruges" (which I wish was on Netflix).
 

EvilTw1n

Even my henchmen think I'm crazy.
Moderator
#42
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I made a mistake on Tuesday night; for some reason, I thought it would be a great idea to watch The Road on Netflix. The only thing I knew about the movie is that the poster for it showed a very scruffy Viggo Mortensen, and that it was based on a book I hadn’t (and haven’t) read by Cormac McCarthy.

As a result, I’ve had terrible nightmares the past two nights. Some people get scared by horror movies, while I apparently get spooked by the specter of what happens the day after collapse. There’s more to it, though. It’s the fear of no longer being safe in the shadows, the psychology of despair, of never getting a good night’s sleep because sleeping too soundly could get you killed (or worse - much worse). It’s the reality of knowing how easily you could be wrenched into a wretch. The anxiety creeps into you; I was curled up in bed last night acutely aware of every groaning, shifting timber of my apartment. I never knew my downstairs neighbor snored, but now I do.

We all would probably imagine ourselves carrying the fire, that we would give off a lovely light. A dangerous flicker, that.
 

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Your Resident Beardy Bear
#43
https://31.media.tumblr.com/2d607272bcb9ef28ea5c6433fa7d29cd/tumblr_n19hcsmtGu1s5kcp6o1_500.jpg


I made a mistake on Tuesday night; for some reason, I thought it would be a great idea to watch The Road on Netflix. The only thing I knew about the movie is that the poster for it showed a very scruffy Viggo Mortensen, and that it was based on a book I hadn’t (and haven’t) read by Cormac McCarthy.

As a result, I’ve had terrible nightmares the past two nights. Some people get scared by horror movies, while I apparently get spooked by the specter of what happens the day after collapse. There’s more to it, though. It’s the fear of no longer being safe in the shadows, the psychology of despair, of never getting a good night’s sleep because sleeping too soundly could get you killed (or worse - much worse). It’s the reality of knowing how easily you could be wrenched into a wretch. The anxiety creeps into you; I was curled up in bed last night acutely aware of every groaning, shifting timber of my apartment. I never knew my downstairs neighbor snored, but now I do.

We all would probably imagine ourselves carrying the fire, that we would give off a lovely light. A dangerous flicker, that.

I have yet to see The Road, but the post-apocalyptic nature of it reminds of The Book of Eli, which I think is a fantastic movie.
 
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