Martial Arts Enthusiast

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#1
Do you enjoy martial arts? Do you enjoy watching action stars kicking ass on-screen, or in real life? Do you enjoy reading up about the arts (MMA, UFC, Boxing, etc all apply of course), or do you even study and train in it yourself? Well, this is the place for you. Let's kick things off with some vids of the one and only, Bruce Lee:


I absolutely love this scene, which is also what I believe kicked off Chuck Norris' career on the silver screen. Even today, it still stands as one of the greatest fight scenes on screen, or if nothing else, the most influential I think. Think of it in terms of Bullitt with its car chase. One thing I also love is the end where Lee grabs Norris' Gi top and belt, and gives it back to him, which was a sign that he was a worthy adversary and put up a good fight.


What I love most about this scene is the raw simplicity of Lee's moves, starting with his Pak Sao at the beginning. It's such a simple technique from Wing Chun, and yet its principles are in Tai Chi, Karate, and even the Filipino Arts as well (you'd like this @mattavelle1 ) Oh, and Lee's side kicks are some of the best I've ever seen.

I was never a Bruce Lee fan until very recently because I simply never paid any attention to him. I was always in the Jackie Chan boat, who was also inspired by Bruce Lee, and even was a stunt person in Enter the Dragon. You could say when Bruce Lee died, Jackie Chan became the next big Chinese superstar. And he wasn't a Bruce Lee copycat either like some of the others out there. He added his own unique flair and twist to the whole thing, such as making fights funny and enjoyable, while also incorporating items of the environment, or using the environment itself to his advantage.

But anyway, enough talking.
 

mattavelle1

IT’S GOT A DEATH RAY!
Moderator
#2
Ok so after thinking about this most of the day after my experience I have this to say.

1. My word I didn't expect to be so sore.

2. And I would have never thought of this one had I not experienced Wing Chun / Shalion Kempo myself. From the outside looking in at my son for a year now the moves / forms and application seem very simple. And at times I would be frustrated at my son for just "not doing it". Tho I have never just "ripped" into him persay but at times I have probably been harder on him than I should have been. Because Martial Arts may look simple but my word it's not. I could see just 3 months going to very very basic muscle memory.

So I apologized to my son for at times possibly being hard on him, and also that I was very proud of how hard he has worked to get to this purple belt over this past year. I didn't respect how difficult martial arts are, but it's much like learning a trade that I have. It takes a lot of time and practice to get any type of grasp of it.

I am for sure continuing in this and I'm very very excited.
 

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
#3

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#4
Ok so after thinking about this most of the day after my experience I have this to say.

1. My word I didn't expect to be so sore.

2. And I would have never thought of this one had I not experienced Wing Chun / Shalion Kempo myself. From the outside looking in at my son for a year now the moves / forms and application seem very simple. And at times I would be frustrated at my son for just "not doing it". Tho I have never just "ripped" into him persay but at times I have probably been harder on him than I should have been. Because Martial Arts may look simple but my word it's not. I could see just 3 months going to very very basic muscle memory.

So I apologized to my son for at times possibly being hard on him, and also that I was very proud of how hard he has worked to get to this purple belt over this past year. I didn't respect how difficult martial arts are, but it's much like learning a trade that I have. It takes a lot of time and practice to get any type of grasp of it.

I am for sure continuing in this and I'm very very excited.
It's interesting because I felt the same way for a lot of the techniques originally, but once I started to become more familiar with all the Kata, and understanding what the moves were for, it all made sense.

One thing about a lot people who study Kata is they simply don't know what the moves are for, and even those who do don't learn them until they reach black belt status (or any advanced rank). At our school, we learn the moves and what they're for the moment we learn the form, so everything falls into place so much easier.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#5
Growing up, this was my favorite fight scene as a kid. Mortal Kombat still stands as one of the best video game adaptations thus far.


And DUDE! That part where you hear the voice of Shao Kahn say, "Reptile." Oh man, was that awesome. Still is.
 
#7
I LOVE Jackie Chan. I will watch anything with him in it mostly. Today I watched Snake in the Eagle's Shadow as well. Some great fights in that, even if the movie itself is kinda 'lolwut'. I dunno lol. I do love a good martial arts movie.

I did Judo in Primary School but stopped as I left onto Secondary school as the lessons were free due to the primary school. I only got to yellow belt. I would love to learn something but money is usually an issue....
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#8
I LOVE Jackie Chan. I will watch anything with him in it mostly. Today I watched Snake in the Eagle's Shadow as well. Some great fights in that, even if the movie itself is kinda 'lolwut'. I dunno lol. I do love a good martial arts movie.

I did Judo in Primary School but stopped as I left onto Secondary school as the lessons were free due to the primary school. I only got to yellow belt. I would love to learn something but money is usually an issue....
Rumble in the Bronx, Jackie Chan's First Strike, Operation Condor, Police Story. My childhood was filled with all of these, and was the inspiration for getting me to take on martial arts myself.

It's never too late to start again, Chris. It's only ever too late when you're dead.
 

Goodtwin

Well-Known Member
#9
Every martial art has a purpose from the past. Styles like tai quandoe were developed for knocking your enemy off a horse. I love the art of fighting. If I hadnt cose Motocross as my hobby, then I would have certainly chosen to learn a martail art. Judo is probably the one I feel is the most practical in real life situations. Jujitsu is better for one on one, but if its three on one, its of little value. I also love boxing, but there are very limited options for adults who want to do boxing as a recreational activity. Glad to see Mattavelle enjoyed his experience. It takes some gumption to get out there and try something new that is a real challenge, and thats what he is doing. Keep at it Matty!
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#10
So just got done watching The Raid 2, and HOLY FUCKING SHIT! Never in my life have I seen more scenes where I go, "OOOOOH," "FUCKING HELL," "JESUS CHRIST," or whatever moment you practically say something because it was so intense.

Seriously, that was probably the most intense set of action fighting scenes that's ever been caught on film. And some of them definitely made my cringe, and I don't normally cringe during movies. Between The Raid: Redemption, and this, the bar has been raised for intensity in fighting scenes, and realism on top of it.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#11
Short Story: I got promoted, everyone!

Long Story: So yesterday, I got tested, or evaluated as I prefer to call it, because I hate tests. It was the only time I could go ahead and get tested at this point because of my work schedule. I was there because I felt I was ready to be promoted to green belt as I've been a blue for almost a year now.

This was also the first Friday workout for the black belts, as well as retesting for the teens going for their adult Shodan rank (don't know if any of them passed because I had to duck out early). My instructor allowed me to be there so I could be evaluated by a number of different black belts. Overall, there was definitely some rust at the beginning, but I got better throughout the morning as things went on. Our 9th Dan, who usually precedes these friday workouts was also evaluating me also, and felt I was definitely on the right track concerning my body mechanics (he had seen black belts with worse body mechanics than me, so I took that as a compliment) And than came our Randori session, which is basically a controlled fighting situation where people take turns putting you into a stressful situation, and you must perform techniques to get them off you. Because we were not wearing any gear, we kept it pretty soft, but even so I know I wasn't do that well at first. For a two minute randori round, it sure takes a lot out of you, but I got better as the round went on.

Just as the round was about to end, one of the guys came up to me and pushed me backwards, and when he pushed me again, I swung my hands towards the back of his neck, and I ended up knocking him out, which was funny because this was a guy who says that knockouts don't work on him. Our 9th Dan looked at my instructor and said, "What belt rank is he going for again?" I guess from his perspective, he was surprised I even knew the technique, let alone could do it effectively under pressure.

I finished off my evaluation with my Tai Chi Kata, which is called Yang 24, which I felt went well. Our 9th Dan said he would stop to correct me during parts of the Kata, but he never stopped me. Guess I was doing something right.

So I was hoping to get promoted, but I also felt I was not good enough. Many of my techniques were not that great I didn't think, but it must've been good enough, because I got promoted in the end. But I didn't get promoted to Green belt, but rather Brown belt, which is the next rank above green. I was totally caught by surprise, and I know I'll have to talk with my instructor later on, and ask what Master Tom (the 9th Dan) thought overall.

So yeah, I went from Blue to Brown in one day, and that only means I have a ton of work ahead of me. Going from Brown to Black is the equivalent of going from White to Brown. So, lots of work to be done, but a lot of self improvement as well.


TL:DR version: Got promoted from Blue Belt to Brown Belt. Everything is awesome!
 

mattavelle1

IT’S GOT A DEATH RAY!
Moderator
#12
Congradualtions Shoulder on that Brown belt! That's freakin awesome!

On my side of things I start my "official" week to week training in Shalion Kempo and Wing Chun at the beginning of September. I hope nothing happens to prevent me from not carrying this on for a very very long time. I wouldn't mind for this to stick with my sons and I for the rest of what days I have.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#13
Congradualtions Shoulder on that Brown belt! That's freakin awesome!

On my side of things I start my "official" week to week training in Shalion Kempo and Wing Chun at the beginning of September. I hope nothing happens to prevent me from not carrying this on for a very very long time. I wouldn't mind for this to stick with my sons and I for the rest of what days I have.
Was going to post this the other day, but Charter was acting like it was drunk. Anyway, take some cues from Ip Chun himself:

 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#14
And actually, speaking of Ip Chun, he had a cool cameo in the movie The Legend is Born: Ip Man. For his size and age, he moves pretty quick, and it just shows you can never be too old to do these sort of things.


I hope to be doing my Tai Chi Chuan (pronounced "tren") for a very long time on top of my Ryukyu Kempo, Kickboxing, and Arnis. And interestingly enough, Wing Chun and Tai Chi borrow from the same principles of close quarters combat and uprooting your opponents. That's why I love some of the stuff in this scene because the feet play an integral role in a fight. Hands are only part of the picture, but most fail to understand how important feet are.

If you ask me, if there was a fight between Ali and Mike Tycon, both in their prime, I think Ali would win based on footwork alone. Tycon was clearly taught pressure points, and knew how to hit them properly and it's why he was able to do such quick knockouts that he was famous for, but I think Ali would still win because he had the better footwork of the two.

I remember TNE had this Ali vs. Tycon debate a few months back. Feel like we should reinvestigate it further. :mfancy:
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#15

Was watching this a few days ago, and it was interesting watching how a lot of what Bruce Lee came up with has funneled its way into the 21st century. A lot of the principles he's talking about I think are reminiscent of what I learn in my martial arts. Whether I'm doing Tai Chi, Arnis, or Kempo, it's all the same. The movements and principles are the same, and yet the styles are different.

Sometimes I wonder about what Bruce Lee meant by not liking "styles," and yet he creates Jeet Kune Do. Almost seems counter-intuitive, but perhaps like the name suggests, "The Way of the Intercepting Fist," it's a philosophy or a way of looking at martial arts rather than what we normally consider as styles. Tai Chi Chuan for example literally means, "Supreme Ultimate Fist," so with that, and what Karate means, "Empty hand," or what Kung Fu translates to, "Hard Work," the principles are all the same between the different "styles."
 

mattavelle1

IT’S GOT A DEATH RAY!
Moderator
#16

Was watching this a few days ago, and it was interesting watching how a lot of what Bruce Lee came up with has funneled its way into the 21st century. A lot of the principles he's talking about I think are reminiscent of what I learn in my martial arts. Whether I'm doing Tai Chi, Arnis, or Kempo, it's all the same. The movements and principles are the same, and yet the styles are different.

Sometimes I wonder about what Bruce Lee meant by not liking "styles," and yet he creates Jeet Kune Do. Almost seems counter-intuitive, but perhaps like the name suggests, "The Way of the Intercepting Fist," it's a philosophy or a way of looking at martial arts rather than what we normally consider as styles. Tai Chi Chuan for example literally means, "Supreme Ultimate Fist," so with that, and what Karate means, "Empty hand," or what Kung Fu translates to, "Hard Work," the principles are all the same between the different "styles."
When he created Jeet Kune Do I have been doing some study's myself on him and he speaks on "honest self expression" which from how I took it ment the truest and most honest reflection of ones self. So basically what he did was say "these martial arts I'm learning are restrictive to how I honestly want to move and reflect my own way of movement". So he set off to figure out how he wanted to do martial arts for himself in the most comfortable and honest way possible, hence creating Jeet Kune Do. Not by accident but it was the only way for him to interject his own "honest self expression". It was made for him and him only to start then it caught on.

Also I start my own full time training this week. *bows respectfully*
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#17
When he created Jeet Kune Do I have been doing some study's myself on him and he speaks on "honest self expression" which from how I took it ment the truest and most honest reflection of ones self. So basically what he did was say "these martial arts I'm learning are restrictive to how I honestly want to move and reflect my own way of movement". So he set off to figure out how he wanted to do martial arts for himself in the most comfortable and honest way possible, hence creating Jeet Kune Do. Not by accident but it was the only way for him to interject his own "honest self expression". It was made for him and him only to start then it caught on.

Also I start my own full time training this week. *bows respectfully*
Yup, I remember when he was talking about how styles were a bit restrictive in movements, so he basically would pick andd choose what worked for him. Interestingly enough, that is exactly what makes a great martial artist anyway, and how you develop your own art as you see fit. That's basically what Bruce Lee wanted, but he also inspired many to follow in similar footsteps. It's why MMA has become pretty big these days, but even I think MMA is somewhat restrictive because it's mainly a sport and not a real fight. There are simply things you cannot do in sport, which are fair game in a real fight.
 

Goodtwin

Well-Known Member
#18
Thats true, but MMA is about as close to a real fight as it gets. Outside of eye gouging, and groin strikes, MMA is a pretty realistic example of one on one combat. Far more so than any other combat sports anyway. Competition removes all techniques except for those that are the most effective. In many disciplines you will learn countless techniques that have a purpose, but are rarely practical in a real world fight. Every technique is a tool in a fighters tool belt, but a competative fighter will concentrate on only those that are the most effective. Thats the difference between a "fighter" and a martial artist. They are not one in the same. A Martial Artist may be a fighter, but a fighter does not have to be a Martial Artist. Athleticism and the ability to take punishment will win out over a more technical figher 90% of the time. There are so many people who know all the technique of their disiciple, but cant execute that in a real fight. Its easy to do a Judo throw on someone who is letting you do it, now try that on somehow is resisting and the whole game changes. Bruce Lee was ahead of the game. He looked at all styles, and took what he felt was the most effective. There is no single style that is the best. He was doing many decades ago what MMA fighters are doing today. He understood that not only was it important to have great technique, but conditioning was equally important. Your seeing a resurgence of boxing in MMA. Why? Because once fighters learn how to keep a fight standing, striking becomes very imporant. Many styles can teach you to block a single strike effectively, but rarely can the human brain react quickly enough to block a 5 strike combination. MMA fighters rarely put together combinations, but in boxing that is a priority. Because boxers were always susceptible to take downs, it was considered useless in MMA, but now that take down defense is becoming a priority, boxing techniques will be at a premium. Its all useful, but its up to the fighter to put it to use.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#19
Thats true, but MMA is about as close to a real fight as it gets. Outside of eye gouging, and groin strikes, MMA is a pretty realistic example of one on one combat. Far more so than any other combat sports anyway. Competition removes all techniques except for those that are the most effective. In many disciplines you will learn countless techniques that have a purpose, but are rarely practical in a real world fight. Every technique is a tool in a fighters tool belt, but a competative fighter will concentrate on only those that are the most effective. Thats the difference between a "fighter" and a martial artist. They are not one in the same. A Martial Artist may be a fighter, but a fighter does not have to be a Martial Artist. Athleticism and the ability to take punishment will win out over a more technical figher 90% of the time. There are so many people who know all the technique of their disiciple, but cant execute that in a real fight. Its easy to do a Judo throw on someone who is letting you do it, now try that on somehow is resisting and the whole game changes. Bruce Lee was ahead of the game. He looked at all styles, and took what he felt was the most effective. There is no single style that is the best. He was doing many decades ago what MMA fighters are doing today. He understood that not only was it important to have great technique, but conditioning was equally important. Your seeing a resurgence of boxing in MMA. Why? Because once fighters learn how to keep a fight standing, striking becomes very imporant. Many styles can teach you to block a single strike effectively, but rarely can the human brain react quickly enough to block a 5 strike combination. MMA fighters rarely put together combinations, but in boxing that is a priority. Because boxers were always susceptible to take downs, it was considered useless in MMA, but now that take down defense is becoming a priority, boxing techniques will be at a premium. Its all useful, but its up to the fighter to put it to use.
Oh most definitely. Out of all the other sports out there, MMA is for sure the most like a real fight, and in a real fight, you forget all the other techniques and go for the ones that would be most useful in a fight. And even if someone has 5 or 6 different techniques for one attack (let's say a right hook or haymaker), reacting to that, and executing that one technique that will work is what's most crucial. So what is more effective? The one you are best at really, and will get the job done. LIke you were saying, this is what Bruce Lee capitalized on during his days as most styles appear to have extra things which are not that relevant.

As an example, take my Modern Arnis. There are twelve angles of attack (whether it be from a stick, crowbar, knife, etc), but realistically only maybe 2 or 3 you'll encounter in a real situation. And of course for every angle of attack, there are twelve different disarms, but only 2 or 3 of them might be the ones that would work for you in a real life scenario. Like you mentioned, different techniques are simply tools in your belt as part of your arsenal for which you might use, but out of 100 different techniques, you maye only use 10 of them. The others you still know, but you are unlikely to ever really use them.

If we're talking actual tools, a belt tensioner tool is very unique and you'll only ever use it for one thing, but it does it very well, and the times when you need it, it definitely comes in handy. Martial arts can amount to the same thing, and fighting in general.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#20
So since I'm up for Shodan in three months (well, it just so happens the next Shodan test is in three months, and then the next one won't be for 15 months, so my instructor is going to see where I'm at in three months after reaching Brown belt), I'm going to get more involved with explaining/teaching stuff in class, because if you cannot explain it, you can't do it.

This evening I just had to teach a lesson of my choosing in Tai Chi (breaking down a movement from the kata), and my brain is fried. Trying to break it down, while keeping it simple is not easy, that's for sure. I know it'll get better as I get more familiar with it, and I know how to do the moves via muscle memory, but breaking it down as to what I'm doing and why I'm doing what I'm doing is a whole new thing.

I knew this was coming, but right now I'm tired, so I'm going to have some gummi fruit-snacks, take a shower, and go to bed.
 

Ex-Actarus

Well-Known Member
#21

I love Bruce Lee and one of my friend shoe me that video. It's just ridiculous ! I mean the guy play ping pong with a nunchaku... Could you even imagine the level of training to accomplish that ?

I wish I did martial art when I was younger - as @mattavelle1 son, ( congratz on that :) )I think it definitely helps down the line when you face tough times. I've seen that with some friend who did martial arts for year. It seems, they are just better at facing obstacles because they had to go through such tough physical and spiritual training !
 

mattavelle1

IT’S GOT A DEATH RAY!
Moderator
#22

I love Bruce Lee and one of my friend shoe me that video. It's just ridiculous ! I mean the guy play ping pong with a nunchaku... Could you even imagine the level of training to accomplish that ?

I wish I did martial art when I was younger - as @mattavelle1 son, ( congratz on that :) )I think it definitely helps down the line when you face tough times. I've seen that with some friend who did martial arts for year. It seems, they are just better at facing obstacles because they had to go through such tough physical and spiritual training !
I defiantly think it was the right move, so much so that when my youngest turns 5 I will be enrolling him day 1 aswell. For myself just in the short time I have been doing it I love it so much, it's been awesome.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#23

I love Bruce Lee and one of my friend shoe me that video. It's just ridiculous ! I mean the guy play ping pong with a nunchaku... Could you even imagine the level of training to accomplish that ?

I wish I did martial art when I was younger - as @mattavelle1 son, ( congratz on that :) )I think it definitely helps down the line when you face tough times. I've seen that with some friend who did martial arts for year. It seems, they are just better at facing obstacles because they had to go through such tough physical and spiritual training !
I've only been doing it for two years, and the things I've picked up, and realized, not just from a fighting perspective or even a sense of confidence, but also just the sheer amount of knowledge is astounding. Nowadays, I am spoiled when watching movies with fight scenes because many of them are for show, and not part of actual fighting.

You might imagine UFC would be a perfect fit, but UFC still has rules (for good reason, mind you), rules that prevent you from legally using specific techniques. Techniques which I can use in a real fight, providing I have enough training under my belt. I won't deny that those who do compete can become quality fighters, but if you're taught from the beginning that you always "block" something, and never learn to , you're doing it wrong. Granted, we all have that "Oh shit," moment, but if you're trained well enough, you will know what's coming before it even happens. I don't have that right now.
 

Odo

Well-Known Member
#24

I love Bruce Lee and one of my friend shoe me that video. It's just ridiculous ! I mean the guy play ping pong with a nunchaku... Could you even imagine the level of training to accomplish that ?

I wish I did martial art when I was younger - as @mattavelle1 son, ( congratz on that :) )I think it definitely helps down the line when you face tough times. I've seen that with some friend who did martial arts for year. It seems, they are just better at facing obstacles because they had to go through such tough physical and spiritual training !
I wonder how Bruce Lee would play Baseball.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#25
I wonder how Bruce Lee would play Baseball.
He would pitch the ball just as fast as other pitchers in the major leagues, but only because the MLB told him to slow down his movements as they were too fast for anyone to see, including the cameras.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#26
So I went back to class, kickboxing and Tai Chi specifically, earlier this evening, and of course it was great to get back. My instructor got his 6th Dan plaque this past weekend while at the Muhammad Ali camp, and he brought back a very eye-opening quote from one of our 9th Dan Grandmasters, Matt Brown.

"Martial Art is education, not recreation."

It's already something I try and follow, but hearing it in that form makes you think about why we do this in the first place. I still respect those who do MMA, Boxing/Kickboxing, etc, but there's a reason why these arts were created in the first place, and why they still exist today.

And in a bit of saddening news, one of our top Grandmasters, Ed Lake, died a couple weeks back suddently from a heart attack. He was also one of our top acupuncturists/healers, and also a man I felt indebted too after he had to come in and save my ass. I still to this day don't know exactly what happened to me that day, but I have theories, which I won't discuss right now.

And it's official: I'll be testing for my Shodan rank on Jan. 29th of next year, so it's definitely not a lot of time to prepare, but my instructors are at least giving me a shot to prove my abilities. I'm expected to train and learn a lot between now and then.
 

mattavelle1

IT’S GOT A DEATH RAY!
Moderator
#27
Well fellas after a few months of Shaolin Kempo / Wing Chun I reckon I don't wanna do this anymore.

My arms after today's sessions feel like what I would imagine the tempature of lava. And when I came home it instantly made me take a nap...........before the class I had only been up for an hour..........and I needed a nap:mfacepalm::mcry:

AND I still suck
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#28
Well fellas after a few months of Shaolin Kempo / Wing Chun I reckon I don't wanna do this anymore.

My arms after today's sessions feel like what I would imagine the tempature of lava. And when I came home it instantly made me take a nap...........before the class I had only been up for an hour..........and I needed a nap:mfacepalm::mcry:

AND I still suck
I've been doing martial arts for two years, Matty, and you know what? I still suck. I might be up for a black belt rank next year, but I still have no skill. Martial Arts are a lifelong art.

Just give it time. :mthumb:
 

mattavelle1

IT’S GOT A DEATH RAY!
Moderator
#29
I've been doing martial arts for two years, Matty, and you know what? I still suck. I might be up for a black belt rank next year, but I still have no skill. Martial Arts are a lifelong art.

Just give it time. :mthumb:
While all those things in my post are true today hell nah I ain't quittin'. I was just saying that for how hard today was. I quit nothing
 

mattavelle1

IT’S GOT A DEATH RAY!
Moderator
#31
Another week another bout of frustration.

This week we were working with sticks. I'm so freakin white it hurts. My footwork is terrible, and it makes it even worse because in Wing Chun it's a flowing, and in someways Shalion Kempo is aswell with the animals.

I just wish I Wasent as stiff moving as I am. An extra room in my house over Christmas is fixing to get turned into my own mini dojo so that I can hopefully get more flexibility and practice in.

Also I have really got to get lighter. A friend of mine just bought 122 acres really close to the house. Last week he cut out a trail of 3.1 miles for a cross country trail.

With my wife getting her new job which it is 8 hours a day. I ran Cross-Country in HS, and my friend invited him up to his course. I think it's high time I started running long distance again. This I know will make me lighter and more flexible. I just hope my whiteness dosent hinder my progress lol. Freakin love Wing Chun I'm very much lovin this even tho there is frustration.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#32
When I started training in Arnis, I was the exact same way. I had an idea of where I was going, but it was very static and stiff because I was simply trying to get through the motions. Over time though, as I practiced it a lot more, I got much better.

Before I was working full-time, I spent an entire summer last year training practically everyday. I would go a train at the Dojo 6 days a week, with Mon and Wed twice a day in the morning and evening. I was also starting to take Tai Chi and Kickboxing on top of Modern Arnis and Ryukyu Kempo, so I was putting everything together as if it were one system.

Footwork has become soooo important in what I do it's not even funny. Don't you ever listen to anyone who says it's all about the hands or the arms. Bull-fucking-shit all day. On top of footwork, your own body is very important, and this is where using your core is important.

Just keep at it, Matty, and you'll get a lot better at it.
 

mattavelle1

IT’S GOT A DEATH RAY!
Moderator
#33
When I started training in Arnis, I was the exact same way. I had an idea of where I was going, but it was very static and stiff because I was simply trying to get through the motions. Over time though, as I practiced it a lot more, I got much better.

Before I was working full-time, I spent an entire summer last year training practically everyday. I would go a train at the Dojo 6 days a week, with Mon and Wed twice a day in the morning and evening. I was also starting to take Tai Chi and Kickboxing on top of Modern Arnis and Ryukyu Kempo, so I was putting everything together as if it were one system.

Footwork has become soooo important in what I do it's not even funny. Don't you ever listen to anyone who says it's all about the hands or the arms. Bull-fucking-shit all day. On top of footwork, your own body is very important, and this is where using your core is important.

Just keep at it, Matty, and you'll get a lot better at it.
Yeah my instructor is on it about footwork freakin big time. "If you can't move how can you effective use your body?" He's right too if nothing is going forward then your leaving your self wide open for all kinds of nastiness. Yeah footwork is huge
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#34
Here's another word of advise now that I was thinking about it. I was helping one of our newer Tai Chi students perform one of the movements we do, which is called, Shuttles. It's essentially a move you use if someone comes from behind and grabs your shoulder, and tries to turn you to face them (it has multiple applications, but this is one of them). It involves clearing your opponents arm (the one they used to grab you), and then following up with a strike to the face or side of the head. The idea with the clearing arm is your body is doing the work, and not the arm itself. Same goes with the striking hand, which the force comes from the rotation of the body towards your opponent.

This sounds rather complicated to explain in words, I know, but I was explaining to this person that your body is doing the work more than your arms.

A punch starts from your feet and ends at the hand. This is how Bruce Lee was so good with his body movements. It's also how he was able to use the 1in punch so effectively.

In Tai Chi, the rule of thumb is Foot before hand, hand before waist. And the first rule of Tai Chi is:

1. Relax

The second rule of Tai Chi is:

2. No, seriously. RELAX.

Wing Chun I would imagine encompasses the same line of principles because of its flowing nature, which is very Tai Chi.
 

mattavelle1

IT’S GOT A DEATH RAY!
Moderator
#35
Here's another word of advise now that I was thinking about it. I was helping one of our newer Tai Chi students perform one of the movements we do, which is called, Shuttles. It's essentially a move you use if someone comes from behind and grabs your shoulder, and tries to turn you to face them (it has multiple applications, but this is one of them). It involves clearing your opponents arm (the one they used to grab you), and then following up with a strike to the face or side of the head. The idea with the clearing arm is your body is doing the work, and not the arm itself. Same goes with the striking hand, which the force comes from the rotation of the body towards your opponent.

This sounds rather complicated to explain in words, I know, but I was explaining to this person that your body is doing the work more than your arms.

A punch starts from your feet and ends at the hand. This is how Bruce Lee was so good with his body movements. It's also how he was able to use the 1in punch so effectively.

In Tai Chi, the rule of thumb is Foot before hand, hand before waist. And the first rule of Tai Chi is:

1. Relax

The second rule of Tai Chi is:

2. No, seriously. RELAX.

Wing Chun I would imagine encompasses the same line of principles because of its flowing nature, which is very Tai Chi.
If I hear Master Dan tell me one more time to relax I'm gonna scream. And here's the thing I wanna relax, and flow like a breeze but I haven't gotten anywhere near that yet. Why? Because it's opponent on opponent so I'm wanting to be strong in blocks, and strikes. Where as this goes against everything in Wing Chun where the more relaxed and focused you are the stronger everything you do. And I know Master Dan has shown me in a relaxed and tense state while I hold a bag or kick shield for him to show me. The relaxed is 10x more on point and stronger. It will come but man I wanna just relax so bad, and in just that wanting to so bad it makes me more tense cause I'm thinking so much about relaxing instead of just damn relaxing.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#36
Usually we hold tension in our shoulders, which forces them up towards our ears rather than have them feel heavy. The same applies to our elbows, which also need to feel heavy.

Here's something my Grandmaster told me: "The secret to Martial Arts is laziness."
 

mattavelle1

IT’S GOT A DEATH RAY!
Moderator
#37
Usually we hold tension in our shoulders, which forces them up towards our ears rather than have them feel heavy. The same applies to our elbows, which also need to feel heavy.

Here's something my Grandmaster told me: "The secret to Martial Arts is laziness."
My shoulders to the ears is the worse, I want to relax them but just haven't mastered that yet. Plus I'm new and don't wanna look like a fool so that's also not helping me.

And today we were doing front to back kicks with people holding kick shields in the front and back.

Dan said "you can kick them it won't hurt them". And I was kicking the hell outta the pad I felt like. Then he showed me how tense I was and I was "just kicking the shield because you aren't relaxed enough to kick all the way thru it and project out the back".

I'll learn the lazy it's just not natural for me..........actually none of this is.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#38
My shoulders to the ears is the worse, I want to relax them but just haven't mastered that yet. Plus I'm new and don't wanna look like a fool so that's also not helping me.

And today we were doing front to back kicks with people holding kick shields in the front and back.

Dan said "you can kick them it won't hurt them". And I was kicking the hell outta the pad I felt like. Then he showed me how tense I was and I was "just kicking the shield because you aren't relaxed enough to kick all the way thru it and project out the back".

I'll learn the lazy it's just not natural for me..........actually none of this is.
None of this was natural for myself either. The first year was rather difficult at times because of this business of not relaxing. As you do it more, you'll develop a more relaxed state of it.

Think of it in terms of your stonemasonry. At first upon learning it, you were probably hesitate because it was so new and you didn't want to unnecessarily break a piece of stone or something. Now,, you appear to just do it without thinking about it, nor worrying about it.
 

mattavelle1

IT’S GOT A DEATH RAY!
Moderator
#39
None of this was natural for myself either. The first year was rather difficult at times because of this business of not relaxing. As you do it more, you'll develop a more relaxed state of it.

Think of it in terms of your stonemasonry. At first upon learning it, you were probably hesitate because it was so new and you didn't want to unnecessarily break a piece of stone or something. Now,, you appear to just do it without thinking about it, nor worrying about it.
All this! I know it's just a matter of time. And apparently everyone I speak too that takes classes there for any amount of time have all said it's hard in the beginning but the more you practice and relax the better or easier it is to understand.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#41
Yeah, those guys picked the wrong person to fight with. And it's not as though the guy was using anything fancy. It was simply two hook punches, a left one on the first guy, and a right hook on the second guy. The third guy was just some punches it looked like.

A lot of the time, especially if you're not expecting to get hit, one well placed hit is all you need, and the fight's done.

Hell, when my instructor was testing for his 6th Dan a couple months ago, I went in to go push him, and he literally slapped me in the face (a well placed slap to the face, mind you), and I went down. There's even video of this happening, and it was a case of, I got hit, and then a beat later, I feel straight to the ground like a rock. But before any of you ask, that footage is not public, so don't ask for it.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#42
So quite a lot of posts got deleted from yesterday it appears, including what I briefly talked about last night, which was how I discovered a new movement in my form as a way of interpreting the kata. And then I broke down the movement into its simplest form by doing the legs and feet first, and then adding in the arms.

This of course is nothing new for me, I already know how to do just the legs and feet, and then add in the rest of the body above the waist afterwards. What got me though was more the mechanics of the movement.

If I'm being specific, the squeezing of the legs together, or rather the inner thighs is what I was working on, and then I realized it was used in more of the movements than I had originally thought.

Like I said last night, I love these lightbulb moments.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#43

I've mentioned a few times how I grew up watching Jackie Chan movies, because I enjoyed his use of the environments to his advantage as well as showing a more human side of it all because he does get hurt. I also just respect how much of a perfectionist he is, and this video further solidifies that. Much more respect for Jackie Chan having watched this video.
 

mattavelle1

IT’S GOT A DEATH RAY!
Moderator
#46
My Gi is Century, so yes. My kickboxing gloves are also Century. At some point, if I stick with this, I'd like to get a Gi from Shureido, which are handmade from Okinawa.
I haven't gotten my Gi yet, but my sons is from century. Now my training gloves are century and I like the heck outta them.

I'm about to order a lot of stuff from there catalog and was wondering if y'all used there stuff aswell.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#47

It's amazing when you think about how small and lightweight Bruce Lee was, and yet could launch his opponents across the room. Word was he used 300lb heavy bags for kicks, and could launch them into the ceiling (bag would be tethered from the ceiling, and so would pendulum upward into the ceiling)

What's even more incredible is how planted he gets when he does his sidekick. He crosses his left leg behind his right, and then lifts his knee up to pushes his right leg out, while at the same time turning his left foot outward. This is also how we learn how to do sidekicks, but it's incredibly difficult to nail down.

The biggest issue when people do these kinds of kicks, and they don't get their knee up enough, and so when he/she extends their leg out, the foot doesn't travel in a straight line like it should, and it ends up becoming a roundhouse kick, which are not a bad thing. A roundhouse kick can be very good for targeting specific areas of the body, but if you're trying to do an actual sidekick, this is crucial to extend the foot in a straight line.

To help learn it, I've attached a belt to my foot, and while bracing myself up against a table or wall, I'll pull on the belt while extending the kick outward. I can only do a handful of these at a time, and then my muscles are incredibly tired. 20 is about my maximum right now.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#48
I haven't gotten my Gi yet, but my sons is from century. Now my training gloves are century and I like the heck outta them.

I'm about to order a lot of stuff from there catalog and was wondering if y'all used there stuff aswell.
Yeah. Century have good quality products, especially if you're starting out. If and when you decide to take this more seriously, upgrading to even better quality stff could be in your future. Who knows? You may want the sort of Gi Ip Man himself wears. :)

Wing Chun. Mattavelle.

 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#49
Want to see your pal, Shoulder fall on his ass a few times? Sure you do. This video was taken back in spring of 2013, only around six or so months into my training, and thought it would be fun to show you guys.

But I'm not only posting this because I'm in it. I also know this is a very useful technique, and you can really get your wrist cranked on as what happened to me that day.

 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#50
Well, tonight's the night. It's too late to learn anything new, so all I can do is trust my own abilities and just go for it. I can't go into this thing as a test, but merely showing off what I can already do.

Wish me luck tonight, guys!
 
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