Martial Arts Enthusiast

mattavelle1

IT’S GOT A DEATH RAY!
Moderator
#52
Congradualtions Shoulder on your Black Belt!!!

And today my son and I both got some good news. I'm up to test for my first belt (yellow). And Trey is up to test for his 3rd belt (purple with a black stripe).

We both test Feb. 14th
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#53
Congradualtions Shoulder on your Black Belt!!!

And today my son and I both got some good news. I'm up to test for my first belt (yellow). And Trey is up to test for his 3rd belt (purple with a black stripe).

We both test Feb. 14th
Great news to hear, Matt! Testing is probably my worst nightmare as I've always struggled with it, written or otherwise. So even going into the Shodan test, in front of these masters and a couple grandmasters, was rather unnerving. Everyone had good things to say about what I did, but also know it won't get any easier next year when testing for Nidan.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#54
I may have passed my Shodan test only a couple weeks ago, but it's going to be a difficult journey ahead to even make it to Nidan, given where I am now. I have hardly any skill behind my belt.

Now immediately, you might be wonder, "Shoulder, you have a black belt, right? Doesn't that mean something?"

And you'd be right. It does mean something. What I have at my rank is a good solid foundation to build on. I have the puzzles pieces in places, but I have to now put them together. For the next two years (because it's two years to Nidan, not just one year, unless Master Tom feels I am ready in one year), I'll have more responsibility under my belt, as well as being able to upheld my training and fulfill it to my abilities.

Just today, I was teaching one of our new guys one of our Kata (Pinan Nidan), and I felt great showing him the ropes of where it goes, and showing him some basic stances, and proper footwork. But then when everyone else left, and it was just myself, and two of our 3rd Dans, including Master Chris, we did some Randori for the last twenty minutes, and I felt like a white belt again.

It was supposed to be a simple Randori session of only using Morotè techniques, and defending against straight punches to the chest (we had gear on), and I was having so much trouble, I still could not execute it right at the end.

And then it hit me. I already told you guys I went from the best brown belt to the worst black belt, but tonight was when it actually sunk right in. I...sucked. But it's also very humbling because I get home, and I go over my stuff, and realized what I was doing wrong (Master Chris already told me what I was doing wrong, but I did not see it right away).

I am in this. I am in this shit for realz now.
 

mattavelle1

IT’S GOT A DEATH RAY!
Moderator
#55
Well I'm nervous has hell but I'm testing for my first belt today.

I'm testing for yellow and my son is testing for his purple with a black stripe.

We have both been practicing hard so wish us luck. It happens today at 11 CST
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#58
So my instructor recorded our test, and he gave me a copy to study and evaluate on. First impressions are I have good techniques, but not enough intent with them, and sometimes my body mechanics were a tad poor. When I was performing my kata, my legs were flailing and not stable enough, and I knew my Naihanchi Shodan wasn't that great. When doing Kihon Waza drills, there wasn't enough of that "pop" when going through the basics.

During Randori, I have the tendency to pause and think for a split-second before doing something, which is something I've known, but it's good to see it with my own eyes firsthand.

So I need to fix:

-Body mechanics
-intent
-don't think, just do
-body structure with the legs
-breathe
-better leg engagement


Overall, I did pretty well, but those are some things I'll need to work on for my Nidan test in a year or two.

@mattavelle1 Btw, how did your test on Saturday go?
 

mattavelle1

IT’S GOT A DEATH RAY!
Moderator
#59
So my instructor recorded our test, and he gave me a copy to study and evaluate on. First impressions are I have good techniques, but not enough intent with them, and sometimes my body mechanics were a tad poor. When I was performing my kata, my legs were flailing and not stable enough, and I knew my Naihanchi Shodan wasn't that great. When doing Kihon Waza drills, there wasn't enough of that "pop" when going through the basics.

During Randori, I have the tendency to pause and think for a split-second before doing something, which is something I've known, but it's good to see it with my own eyes firsthand.

So I need to fix:

-Body mechanics
-intent
-don't think, just do
-body structure with the legs
-breathe
-better leg engagement


Overall, I did pretty well, but those are some things I'll need to work on for my Nidan test in a year or two.

@mattavelle1 Btw, how did your test on Saturday go?
We both passed and it was much more intense than I thought it would be. At one point he had us all face the wall and he would call us out to the center with him. He would call off moves for your level but would attack you as soon as he finished saying the move. That was crazy he expected us to know them that well and move that fast.

I WAS SO PROUD of my son! When it was his turn to go to the center I could see him but I was listening. All the things I was nervous he didn't know he killed it. He was moving perfectly and did all the high moves Master Dan was calling off.

When he came back to the wall I glanced at him and gave him a huge smile and thumbs up. He was super proud of himself as he should have been. I was proud I passed aswell.

On to the next belts moves.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#60
We both passed and it was much more intense than I thought it would be. At one point he had us all face the wall and he would call us out to the center with him. He would call off moves for your level but would attack you as soon as he finished saying the move. That was crazy he expected us to know them that well and move that fast.

I WAS SO PROUD of my son! When it was his turn to go to the center I could see him but I was listening. All the things I was nervous he didn't know he killed it. He was moving perfectly and did all the high moves Master Dan was calling off.

When he came back to the wall I glanced at him and gave him a huge smile and thumbs up. He was super proud of himself as he should have been. I was proud I passed aswell.

On to the next belts moves.
Awesome sauce! Now, go train. :mthumb:
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#62
It's funny, I talked with Master Chris last night, and mentioned I had watched it, and know some things I need to work on. And he said I need to watch that video religiously and really nitpick on things, and be ruthless on it.

He's already training us at a 3rd Dan level, ar at least 3rd Dan knowledge because I understand a fair bit of Kyusho theory (this is why the moves exist in various Kata), and yet we did not have to explain any of that unlike past tests. Each year, the black belt tests get tweaked more and more on what we should know and perform at specific ranks. The last two tests I've been an Uke for all had some explantion for theory, but other areas they did not have unlike my test, such as breakdown of three Kata, versus two in previous tests.

After further analysis of my Kata from the test, I know my Naihanchi was poor in the scheme of things, but I know that was still better than some Master ranks have done in the past. That also shows just how poor some people are trained over the years.

But anyway, back to training. I've been thinking of doing Tai Chi movements while playing MH4U. Call it Tai Chi Monster Hunter.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#63
So today was unique because we haven't done a Black Belt friday training in a long time (before I was a Shodan). It was almost five hours of training, mostly on specific details and interpretations on things.

One of our guys, who's background is in Judo demonstrated a body drop that has a similar application to a movement in a Kata I don't know (called Kusanku). And guess what? I was the guinea pig to get thrown to the ground. He demonstrated on film (sorry guys, you won't be able to see Shoulder get thrown to the ground) this technique 3 or 4 times, and I'm sure I landed on my hip a couple of times because it hurts right now. Took some Ibuprofen, so I should be fine. It's not as though I can't walk.

Tomorrow, that same guy is teaching a Judo workshop, so we'll be incorporating throws and takedowns into our Kempo, which we don't normally use (we do train to attack the legs and such, which will help us get a takedown, but not the stuff they do in Judo). In the end though, it's all the same.

And with another day of training and being thrown to the ground will mean being sore the next day, I'm sure.

Thanks for reading. Now, go train.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#64
So as I also do Kickboxing, one of the things we train is in the Leo Fong combos, or boxing drills as we call them. Interestingly enough though, Leo Fong calls these the 10 angles, and not so much as boxing combos or drills.

So Master Chris found a video of Leo Fong performing these 10 angles, with the footwork, because up until this point, we haven't really paid close attention to the footwork because all we had to go on was some written details of the combos, and not a video to see how they should also look. We can do the combos, although I'm not very good at them, but understanding the footwork during my last kickboxing class made me feel like I was a white belt again.

The way Leo Fong does it has completely changed how I look at those drills, and in my search on YT, I just happened to find Leo Fong doing these ten angles. Here's what I'm talking about:


I do have a write-up, detailing each of the combos, and with the switch steps of the feet, but I had never seen it performed by Leo himself until this past week. Now I have a video at my disposal to further unerstand how he does it, and then adapt it to my training.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#65
http://brandedinthe80s.com/6460/the-essential-action-jeans-1977-1991

The Chuck Norris Action Jeans sounded pretty awesome back in the day. I have a pair of Khaki's from Duluth Trading which are their Fire Hose Flex pants with the gussets in them, and they provide a lot of extra room. Kicking has never been easier in regular street clothes! It's just too bad their actual jeans are too baggy for my tastes. I want a more straight leg (not skinny jeans) with gussets, but have yet to find those.

Maybe I'll try Duluth Trading again with their Ballroom Jeans.

Here's a link: http://www.duluthtrading.com/store/mens/workwear/ballroom-jeans/work-jeans.aspx

Something you might be interested in, @mattavelle1
 

mattavelle1

IT’S GOT A DEATH RAY!
Moderator
#66
http://brandedinthe80s.com/6460/the-essential-action-jeans-1977-1991

The Chuck Norris Action Jeans sounded pretty awesome back in the day. I have a pair of Khaki's from Duluth Trading which are their Fire Hose Flex pants with the gussets in them, and they provide a lot of extra room. Kicking has never been easier in regular street clothes! It's just too bad their actual jeans are too baggy for my tastes. I want a more straight leg (not skinny jeans) with gussets, but have yet to find those.

Maybe I'll try Duluth Trading again with their Ballroom Jeans.

Here's a link: http://www.duluthtrading.com/store/mens/workwear/ballroom-jeans/work-jeans.aspx

Something you might be interested in, @mattavelle1
I love Duluth workwear. Thank you Shoulder!:mthumb:
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#67
Skip to page 62, and you'll find a very interesting article that applies not only to concealed carry, but almost any skillset, including martial arts. My instructors showed me this last week, and decided to see if I could find this online. Well, this PDF is all you have to go on, but at least you'll be able to read it. The article is titled, "Spectrum of Competence."

A very good read, indeed.

https://www.usconcealedcarry.com/wp-content/issues/2014/aug-sep-2014.pdf
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#69
So last week, I bought some ankle weights, 2 1/2lbs for each leg. I initially bought them to help aid in my training when I rep. On a normal day, I can do 500 kicks, 250 on each leg, which is adequate, but nothing to shout about. Master Tom (not to be confused with my instructor, Master Chris) is 57, and he'll do 500 on each leg, sometimes up to 1000 on each, and that's with 5-10lb ankle weights. Seeing as this guy is twice my age, I should be able to at least keep up with him, even if he has over 40 years of training under his belt.

On Sunday, I decided to try them out, and was tired after only 50 on each leg, and that was with some of the weight taken out. It was a mere 1.5lbs on each leg, and that was enough to tire me out. I was simply amazed how so little weight can make a big difference.

So as I'll continue to train and rep stuff, I'll even start using ankle weights while at work, seeing as we have to wear pants, and I do a lot of walking. Figure it will help strengthen my legs in the process, although these weights I bought were more expensive, so I'll probably buy a second set for work and go from there.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#72
So tonight was one of those "Aha" moments in Tai Chi. As we're just playing with Silk reeling, which is a principle of movement in Tai Chi Chuan, and as I'm practicing on my partner, I discovered that the position I put him in when I locked up his arms was remarkably similar to a movement in our Kata.

Basically, when performing your Kata, you are not just doing moves, but the movements themselves could also be a tell, or a way of saying this is the position your opponent will be in as you hit them. SO not only did I discover that I can use this movement out of our Kata as a striking/locking technique, but it just might also provide a tell as to what your opponent will be doing when you perform the technique.

In layman's terms, there are always multiple ways to interpret a Kata and its movements. You may only know one way of doing it, but there are always multiple ways of interpreting it. It is up to you to discover that.

Now I must train harder...
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#73
Growing up, this was my favorite fight scene as a kid. Mortal Kombat still stands as one of the best video game adaptations thus far.


And DUDE! That part where you hear the voice of Shao Kahn say, "Reptile." Oh man, was that awesome. Still is.
Deja Vu all over again. I just watched thi scene again, but watching the full movie on Netflix as we speak. Dem feels, man. Dem feels...
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#74

I love this movie, and I don't necessarily disagree with what this guy is saying either. In fact, it makes perfect sense. I still think the fighting in this movie is rather underwhelming by today's standards. I'm spoiled by the Bourne movies.

Speaking of Bourne, always loved this fight scene from the first one:

 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#75
Been awhile since I've posted here, but next month I'm going to the old Muhammad Ali training camp for an annual seminar. My instructor asked if I was interested as he and a couple other students are going, so I expressed in my interest in going as well. He said quite a few people in our group, KJK or Kyusho-Jitsu Kenkyukai, will be attending, so that should be cool to see more folks I know, and of course meet and train with new people as well, and share knowledge.

I may not be training as often as I should, but since I started adding ankle weights to my kicking routine this week, and will be repping my Katas a lot more in the coming weeks in prep for the seminar (Hey, I got to look good), I plan to be fully back in action.
 

mattavelle1

IT’S GOT A DEATH RAY!
Moderator
#77
So I've exclusively for now been taking a blend class of Shalion Kempo and Wing-Chun. And I freaking love every damn min of it.

So much more fluid with lots of trapping and CQC. Once I get much better I'll talk more In depth about it. Right now it's just master Dan and I in the class and I'm getting one on one training every week by a 5th degree black belt. And man is it brutal but I'm soaking up everything I can.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#78
So I've exclusively for now been taking a blend class of Shalion Kempo and Wing-Chun. And I freaking love every damn min of it.

So much more fluid with lots of trapping and CQC. Once I get much better I'll talk more In depth about it. Right now it's just master Dan and I in the class and I'm getting one on one training every week by a 5th degree black belt. And man is it brutal but I'm soaking up everything I can.
That's very cool, Matt!

Since I've been working so much, I have not trained as much so I'm making a habit of getting into the Dojo every Saturday that I can, and train with others who want to join. This morning should be good with a few people, and Master Chris as well.

We have board testing coming up in November that I plan to be there to evaluate the Kyu ranks testing. I also have a Tai Chi Chuan test later that evening which I'm strongly encouraged to test to see where I am at. Master Tom will be there to evaluate us, so we're in good hands. It's funny though because I have hardly been going over my Tai Chi, so I'm not as fluid as I once was.

And yes, soak up all you can until your head is cooked. :msrs:
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#79
So the other week, I was surfing through Reddit, someone posted this photo of Ali:



What is actually going on wasn't what I was focusing, but rather Ali's fist. The way how he makes his fist, with the index finger straight, and the other fingers curled up. This is fist is commonly taught in Okiwawa, or by people who are taught Okinawan martial arts such as Karate. I am too someone who is taught this fist, which we refer to it as our Ryukyu fist (Ryukyu is also the original name for Okinawa before Japan took over).

The concept behind the ryukyu fist is you have much better structure with the fist, so you can punch harder and better, and are also less likely to break your bones, especially if you train to punch properly. Ali trained with George Dillman for a number of years (he is also our 10th Dan in Ryukyu Kempo Tode-Jitsu), and it's clear Dillman had a major influence on Ali, and the fist is only one aspect of it.

I also came across this interesting article talking about the old Okinawan fist:

http://www.fightingarts.com/reading/article.php?id=215

As the article points out, it is not the easiest fist to make, especially quickly, but train it enough and it becomes as easy as making a regular fist. These days, whenever I do make a fist, this fist is what I always default to, regardless of the situation. It just comes naturally for me now, and I feel the normal fist most people make is not strong enough of a fist as a result. Like the article said, it's been suggested it was taught as a beginner fist, and then as you got better, then this alternate fist what was taught. And obviously, there is some opposition from some who also train in the arts.

I just thought it was interesting to see this photo of Ali with the same fist that I was taught, given the influence of Dillman, and perhaps why Ali was as good as he was. I remember we had that big debate awhile back as to who, in their prime, would've been better: Ali or Tyson. If you ask me, Ali likely would've won against Tyson, but Tyson would definitely hold his own.
 

Goodtwin

Well-Known Member
#80
Tyson was better offensively, but Ali was way more durable. I would say durability tends to be more important in fights. Once a guy loses his jaw, assuming he ever had one, his career is over. Every fighter can deliver a good amount of punishment, very few can walk through it and keep moving forward. Nick Diaz isn't a monster offensively, but his durability and move forward mentality broke many fighters.

As for the fist, most people break their hand because they aren't focusing the strike through the knuckles on the index and middle finger. Our to much stress on the pinky and ring knuckle will break a had quickly.

Sent from my SM-G360V using Tapatalk
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#81
Tyson was better offensively, but Ali was way more durable. I would say durability tends to be more important in fights. Once a guy loses his jaw, assuming he ever had one, his career is over. Every fighter can deliver a good amount of punishment, very few can walk through it and keep moving forward. Nick Diaz isn't a monster offensively, but his durability and move forward mentality broke many fighters.

As for the fist, most people break their hand because they aren't focusing the strike through the knuckles on the index and middle finger. Our to much stress on the pinky and ring knuckle will break a had quickly.

Sent from my SM-G360V using genital warts
Agreed about Ali, and bingo on the fists.

For Ali, he also had the footwork, which made him a bit unpredictable at this time, whereas Tyson liked to stand his ground and move within his area he was at. Don't get me wrong, he was very good at what he did, and with his first round KOs, but I still would put Ali over Tyson, at their prime, in a hypothetical fight.

We are also taught to punch with the middle and index fingers. Even in the case of a hook punch, which is very common in boxing, punching with those two knuckles is crucial. Interestingly enough, if you do punch correctly, those two knuckles actually line up with your ulna and radius, so the punch itself becomes stronger. And if you punch as if your hands were in a 10 and 2 position on a steering wheel, everything becomes perfectly aligned, and you can punch harder (and safer). It's about all 45 degree angles.
 

Goodtwin

Well-Known Member
#82
Tyson was very technical early in his career. Great head movement and worked the body as good as anyone. He also generated power through his legs. If you watch Tyson, his knees are bent, he's slightly hunched over, and then he exploded upward while throwing power puches. His power starts at the ground. It's why he hit so hard for a smaller heavyweight.

Sent from my SM-G360V using Tapatalk
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#84
I remember watching that first video I believe on Kotaku a month or so ago, and then thought to myself, "Why haven't I seen these kinds of videos before?" Really cool stuff to see done in real life.




So in other news, since I've been working out of town since June, I have not been in the Dojo training as often as I normally would. That being said, I would spend a good portion of my time working on my stuff in the hotel room, repping kata and basics, but I was still not always in the Dojo. Lately, over the past several weeks, I've been getting back on the mat on Saturdays (and occasionally on Thursday nights when I'm back town followed by a Friday blackbelt workout) since I now possess a key to the Dojo. So a couple months ago, I was reminded of a school in Green Bay that once attended one of our seminars, and has also trained with Master Tom on a number of occasions. The thing is they don't always get a lot of the information and training that we get, so I was instructed to not only go train there, but also help them out to discover and expand their knowledge, while also locking down on my stuff.

So this week, I finally got in touch with this school and their instructor, and started training with some of their people on Monday, and again earlier tonight. First off, it was eye opening finding out what they don't know that I know, but also reassuring what they do know. I think the more humbling part though is they are very open-minded into discovering more about their art, and/or finding out new ways to interpret things. Basically, I'm invited to come train there anytime that I'm working out here, so I have a place to train, as well develop new friendships along the way.

I've also been told that I will be testing for Nidan next month, so I have a lot to lock down between now and then in my Kempo. Master Chris seems to think if just do my stuff, I'll have no issue passing, so I guess that's good news. No guarantees though.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#85
A year ago, I was preparing for my Shodan, and now a year later, I am preparing for my Nidan exam this upcoming Thursday.

It is going to be a busy week because we have so many people coming in to train for the seminar, as well as people coming to the seminar. We have eight 9th Dans coming in, 6 of which are teaching, but that's for the upcoming weekend.

Thursday afternoon, I will be testing, which should be no more than two hours. Then the normal schedule of classes will commence with Yoga, Kickboxing, and Tai Chi, and then we have a guy from Atlanta doing a ground fighting session. That's just Thursday.

On Friday, there's Sandan testing (which I don't think I'll be there as an Uke, but I suspect I might be there anyway, but don't know for sure) in the morning, and then early evening is the start of the Seminar. After the seminar is done that night, it's a band and cash bar, so lots of social time.

Saturday is the big day with up to 8 hours of training with everyone there, followed by the banquet, and then social time again. Then on Sunday morning, we have another session where our knife and stick guy, Ken Smith will be teaching more stuff with us, but this time at the Dojo. And then that's the end of our training for the week.

So yeah, lots and lots going on. At least I'll have my test first rather than last, so that'll be out of the way.


On a side note, since I train in Okinawan Karate, I figured it would be a good time to show some of which I do, so here you go:


Also, some people think Okinawan and Japanese Karate are the same...but they are not. They are in fact very different in how they are taught. As shown in the article listed below, one aspect that really sticks out for me is the Why over the How. In Japanese Karate, you are taught the How. So how do we do this? In Okinawan Karate, we teach the Why. Why are we doing this? What is this for? Things like that.

Anyway, here's the article I speak of:

http://japaneseweapons.org/karate/10-differences-between-okinawan-karate-japanese-karate/
 

mattavelle1

IT’S GOT A DEATH RAY!
Moderator
#86
Shoulder...........OH Shoulder:mgrin:

I just got schedualled to test for my purple belt March the 19th!

IM SO FREAKIN EXCITED!!!

Also since I haven't been here in awhile I just wanna say this. I'm relaxed in class finally, I feel comfortable and I feel like it's becoming easier to learn. All that being said I'm a super long way away from where I will be.

Let me ask you something kinda personal. What type of fighter are you naturally? I'm finding out that my natural personality in my years of sports was also almost zealously defensive. I may not score much at all, but if I was guarding you I knew for a fact you weren't gonna score.

This is spilling into my Kempo. Im not saying it's a bad thing. But what I am saying is offense is feeling very frustrating for myself, not that I can't be offensive but that it's terribly against my natural state and I don't want it to feel so unatural when my offensive turn comes around.

Thoughts my friend?:mconfuse:

(all that being said I'm much more in love now then I was at the beginning. I don't want my offense to be a point of contention tho)
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#87
Shoulder...........OH Shoulder:mgrin:

I just got schedualled to test for my purple belt March the 19th!

IM SO FREAKIN EXCITED!!!

Also since I haven't been here in awhile I just wanna say this. I'm relaxed in class finally, I feel comfortable and I feel like it's becoming easier to learn. All that being said I'm a super long way away from where I will be.

Let me ask you something kinda personal. What type of fighter are you naturally? I'm finding out that my natural personality in my years of sports was also almost zealously defensive. I may not score much at all, but if I was guarding you I knew for a fact you weren't gonna score.

This is spilling into my Kempo. Im not saying it's a bad thing. But what I am saying is offense is feeling very frustrating for myself, not that I can't be offensive but that it's terribly against my natural state and I don't want it to feel so unatural when my offensive turn comes around.

Thoughts my friend?:mconfuse:

(all that being said I'm much more in love now then I was at the beginning. I don't want my offense to be a point of contention tho)
I'm not a fighter. I'm a martial artist. :msilly:

In seriousness though, I tend to be more of a defensive person where I will not act unless I am forced to. If I don't have to engage, I won't. This also presents a big problem for me because I am a nice person, and don't want to hurt my partner. So when I am repping techniques, I put too much thought into thinking what I might do rather than just doing. This is becoming more of an issue right now because this is part of the reason I failed my Nidan test. I had the mechanics and knowledge of a Nidan level, but my skillset was not quite there. I was too tense, stressed, and also rushed through my techniques. Not to mention I was beating the shit out of the Uke's (rather than doing techniques with control), so that didn't help. My instructor was almost ready to stop the test right there unless I changed my tune. I cannot exactly explain why all this tension and stress came about though.

Going back to the defensive vs. offiensive side of things. I am not about to put myself into a position to get into a fight. At the same time though, this mindset I think has caused me to not commit to my techniques. I get the entry, and then I pause and think rather than just do. I seem to be doing that more and more, and I'm not sure why. But what this also does I end up withholding intent. Part of it is because-again, I'm actually a nice person and don't want to hurt my partner, so that intention gets lost. But many times I've done techniques without much intention, and I'll nearly knock someone out or have them almost fall to the ground. Those were just well placed hits using solid body mechanics and good Kyusho.

It's also that I have to trust the Kata, and what the moves are for. Everything we do has elements of our Naihanchi and Pinan Katas, as well as my Tai Chi Kata, Yang 24, but mostly you'll find techniques just from Naihanchi alone.

So to sum up, I'm a defensive person, but that is basically what self-defense is about. We are not about to put ourselves into scenarios that might get us into a situation. But if I have no other choice, I will commit and go on the offensive. I don't think you can be just one or the other.

Does that make any sense? If you have any more questions, I'll try and answer them.
 

mattavelle1

IT’S GOT A DEATH RAY!
Moderator
#88
I'm not a fighter. I'm a martial artist. :msilly:

In seriousness though, I tend to be more of a defensive person where I will not act unless I am forced to. If I don't have to engage, I won't. This also presents a big problem for me because I am a nice person, and don't want to hurt my partner. So when I am repping techniques, I put too much thought into thinking what I might do rather than just doing. This is becoming more of an issue right now because this is part of the reason I failed my Nidan test. I had the mechanics and knowledge of a Nidan level, but my skillset was not quite there. I was too tense, stressed, and also rushed through my techniques. Not to mention I was beating the shit out of the Uke's (rather than doing techniques with control), so that didn't help. My instructor was almost ready to stop the test right there unless I changed my tune. I cannot exactly explain why all this tension and stress came about though.

Going back to the defensive vs. offiensive side of things. I am not about to put myself into a position to get into a fight. At the same time though, this mindset I think has caused me to not commit to my techniques. I get the entry, and then I pause and think rather than just do. I seem to be doing that more and more, and I'm not sure why. But what this also does I end up withholding intent. Part of it is because-again, I'm actually a nice person and don't want to hurt my partner, so that intention gets lost. But many times I've done techniques without much intention, and I'll nearly knock someone out or have them almost fall to the ground. Those were just well placed hits using solid body mechanics and good Kyusho.

It's also that I have to trust the Kata, and what the moves are for. Everything we do has elements of our Naihanchi and Pinan Katas, as well as my Tai Chi Kata, Yang 24, but mostly you'll find techniques just from Naihanchi alone.

So to sum up, I'm a defensive person, but that is basically what self-defense is about. We are not about to put ourselves into scenarios that might get us into a situation. But if I have no other choice, I will commit and go on the offensive. I don't think you can be just one or the other.

Does that make any sense? If you have any more questions, I'll try and answer them.
I should have known when I asked you you would be just like me. :mgrin:
 

simplyTravis

Lamer Gamers Podcast Co-Host
#89
Hey, in Jiu Jitsu is it more grapple based while sparring or is it also strike based? I'm thinking about doing some Brazilian Jiu Jitsu when I drop another 30 pounds but I would like to keep my teeth.
 

mattavelle1

IT’S GOT A DEATH RAY!
Moderator
#90
Hey, in Jiu Jitsu is it more grapple based while sparring or is it also strike based? I'm thinking about doing some Brazilian Jiu Jitsu when I drop another 30 pounds but I would like to keep my teeth.
This is not my martial art I'm taking Shalion Kempo / Wing Chun and a blend of the 2. My style is very much standing up and fighting. Actually Master Dan showed us one day what our art looks like when it's on the ground.

You know watching MMA it seems like "get a guy on the ground and if your ninjutsu is tight you win". WELL........if you get me on the ground be ready for a flurry of nut shots, eye gouge, elbows while pulling you in. I would not want to get ontop of me in a street fight it was brutal and furious.

So that's what I know about mine. I don't have an idea really what ninjutsu Entails as far as the art
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#91
Hey, in Jiu Jitsu is it more grapple based while sparring or is it also strike based? I'm thinking about doing some Brazilian Jiu Jitsu when I drop another 30 pounds but I would like to keep my teeth.
BJJ is more grappling and ground-based fighting. In retrospect, every martial art has striking in it, just as any martial art can have kicking in it, even though something such as Tae Kwon Do is primarily about kicking. In one of my arts, Ryukyu Kempo, that is primarily a striking art, but we incorporate grappling and joint-locking just as easily as striking, including kicking. It's all in the Katas.

I've done some groundfighting, but it is very limited in my knowledge, and I'm rather horrible at it. I just prefer not to get put on the ground by someone, and stay standing. :mthumb:
 
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mattavelle1

IT’S GOT A DEATH RAY!
Moderator
#92
Alright alright Shoulder goin for that purple belt tomorrow!!!

Last night I went over all my moves, I'm pretty nervous about the whole thing honestly.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#93
Alright alright Shoulder goin for that purple belt tomorrow!!!

Last night I went over all my moves, I'm pretty nervous about the whole thing honestly.
It's ok to be nervous. But honestly, testing helps keep us honest in the arts. What's interesting though there are loads of people in DKI and KJK that feel because they are a master or even grandmaster rank, they feel they don't need to be tested again, and should be able to progress when enough time has passed. One of the things we're all finding out is those who do step up to prove their skills end up actually raising the bar of what these ranks should be, so it actually benefits the arts as a whole, and again, keeps us honest.

Just a prime example here. So Master Chris is a 6th Dan, and when I was at the Dillman Camp last October, there was this one woman who got promoted to 6th Dan at the Camp (I don't know if she simply tested, or if her husband, who is a 9th Dan, felt she was ready to be promoted). She doesn't have even half the skill of Chris, I'll tell you that right now. But it's not just her though. It's a lot of people, and you see people with these high ranks, and yet most of them cannot even prove their skills effectively as they should. Some of it is age, but I was an Uke for a 70 year old guy who was going for his 8th Dan at the October Camp. And guess, what? He may be 70, but the man moves like he was half his age, and he did so without much effort either.

Sorry for rambling, Matt. I remember testing for my purple and was very nervous as well, so you're not alone. Hell, I was nervous during my Nidan test, but I was not able to calm down either. Maybe that's why I did not attend class at all this week as I needed to step away for a couple weeks for some R&R. I've noticed I've been more frustrated in class, but have kept it more internal. But this frustration has turned into getting upset as well, and almost yelling and screaming on the drive home, and I've been wondering why. Master Chris doesn't want me to think when I do stuff, and yet that's all I can do. That's all I've ever done in anything is think. I never did sports as a kid, or extra cirricular activities, so I don't have that mindset like he did growing up.

It's extremely difficult to just not think about what I'm doing. Sure, there are many things I can do in terms of muscle memory, but I'm still conscious about it. I never stop thinking, and simply think and react faster.

There are times these days when I just want to go all Leonidas.

 
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