N64 graphics specs?

hogge

Active Member
#1
I'm currently learning to program in Unity, so like a slight side-project I'm making a simple game which I want to look like an N64 game.
So I was curious if anyone here knows anything about what texture resolutions and poly counts that commonly were used on vehicles on the N64,
 

hogge

Active Member
#3
That really didn't answer my question at all.When looking at Perfect Dark characters, my guess is that they have somewhere in the area of 200 triangles and then one 128x128 texture for each body and head. But that's just a guess.I was hoping that this page had an old retro buff who could give a solid answer.
 
#4
As far as I know, there were only 395 N64 games and most of these development teams don't exist anymore or have merged with a larger team.
At any rate, the amount of polygons used varies I'd think. Anyway, I don't think I'd be of much help. Why do you want to make it look like an N64 game anyway? I don't remember any N64 games that stood the test of time.
 

TheAmazingLSB

PLEASE UNDERSTAND....
#5
The Nintendo 64's central processing unit (CPU) is the NEC VR4300.[sup][55] This processor was the most powerful console CPU of its generation;[sup][56] Popular Electronics said it had power similar to the Pentium processors found in desktop computers.[sup][19][/sup] Except for its narrower 32-bit system bus, the VR4300 retained the computational abilities of the more powerful 64-bit MIPS R4300i,[55][/sup] though software rarely took advantage of 64-bit data precision operations. N64 game-titles generally used faster (and more compact) 32-bit data-operations,[57][/sup] as these were sufficient to generate 3D-scene data for the console's RSP (Reality Signal Processor) unit. In addition, 32-bit code executed faster and required less storage space (which was at a premium on the N64's cartridges).
mily: sans-serif; font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 19.200000762939453px; margin: 0.4em 0px 0.5em; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">In terms of its random-access memory, or RAM, the Nintendo 64 was one of the first modern consoles to implement a unified memory subsystem, instead of having separate banks of memory for CPU, audio, and video, for example. The memory itself consists of 4 megabytes of RDRAM, made by Rambus. The RAM is expandable to 8 MB with the Expansion Pak. Rambus was quite new at the time and offered Nintendo a way to provide a large amount of bandwidth for a relatively low cost.
The system allows for video output in two formats: composite video[sup][58][/sup] and S-Video. The composite and S-Video cables are the same as those used with the earlier SNES and later GameCube systems.
The Nintendo 64 supports ackground-repeat: initial initial;">16.8 million colors.[sup][citation needed] The system can display resolutions of 256 × 224, 320 × 240 and 640 × 480 pixels. Few games made use of the 640 × 480 mode, many of them required use of the Expansion Pak RAM upgrade. The vast majority of games instead used the system's low resolution 256 × 224 (256 × 240 for PAL models) mode. A number of games also support a video display ratio of up to 16:9 using either Anamorphic widescreen or Letterboxing. However, very few of its games provided options to use this feature.[sup][citation needed]
[sup]


The N64 was only able to pump out around 100,000 - 150,000 fully textured polygons per second.... [/sup]


[/sup]

It was actually less powerfull than the PSX and the Saturn in terms of how many polys it was pushing.... [/sup]
ckground-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">[sup]

[sup]But the N64 had graphical effects the PSX and Saturn did not, which made them N64 games look far more advanced with less poly count....

[sup]


[sup]I think the PSX clocked in at about 1 million flat surface textured polys a sec and 500,000 with all the textures and features on....

[sup]


[sup]Saturn was around 500,000 flat textured poly's and 200,000 with all the bells and whistles....[/sup]


[/sup]

Hope this helps you....[/sup]

http://www.vgmuseum.com/systems/japn64/[/sup]


[/sup]


[/sup]


Click for large size.
: -webkit-center; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">Technical Specs


[sup][/sup]







CPU:


MIPS 64-bit RISC CPU (customized R4000 series)






Clock Speed:


93.75 MHz






Co-processor:


64-bit RISC processor running at 62.5 MHz
RCP SP (Sound and Graphics Processor)
and DP ( Pixel Drawing Processor)






Graphics processing functions:


Z-Buffering, Anti-aliasing, eliminates jagged lines and edges, mostly in low res.
Realistic texture-mapping.
Alpha Channel effectsFog, Transparency, etc.
Ray-Tracing/sophisticated form of light tracing ability.
Gouraud shading, (Featuring: Tri-Linear filtered mip-map interpolation, Perspective correction, Environment mapping).






Memory:


Rambus D-RAM 36 Mbits






Transfer Speed
:


Maximum transfer speed 4,500 M bits/sec. running at 500Mhz.






Polygon draw rate
:


150,000pps with all effects @ 60fps






Resolution
:


256 X 224 - 640 X 480 dots with flicker free interlace mode support






Color
:


Maximum: 16.8 million colors, 32-Bit RGBA
Pixel Color Frames Buffer Support
21-Bit color video output
16.8 million colors available
32,000 colors on screen at once






Output
:


RF, Stereo A/V, S-Video, HDTV, NTSC/PAL





Digital sound
:

face="arial" size="-2">16-bit




Number of voices:


ADPCM: 16-24 channels w/pitch-shifting
PCM: 100 channels possible, take 1% of CPU each






Sampling frequency:


44.1KHz or 48KHz (selectable)






Benchmark performance:


Main CPU clocked at 125 MIPS (millions of instructions per second)
Graphics Co-Processor clocked at 100+ MFLOPS (millions of floating point operations per second)
100,000 polygons per second, with all hardware graphic features turned on.






Controller
:


Input for four controllers
Analog/Digital
Total of nine buttons






Dimensions
:


10.23" wide x 7.48" deep x 2.87" high






Weight
:


2.42 pounds
 

hogge

Active Member
#6
So I guess somewhere around 5000 tris on-screen at once, essentially. That clarified things a little bit at least.
 

Tucker

“Do you happen to know how to fly this thing?”
#7
Yeah, the N64 was a real odd-ball. Beyond that, console development is a sea of nips-and-tucks by necessity. One game may have x effects in play while the other has y.
Trying to convert that into some sort of quantifiable "N64" looks will be nigh-on impossible. Just do it subjectively.
 

hogge

Active Member
#8
Yeah, agreed.The idea isn't to ACTUALLY make an N64-game, but it'd still be nice to be able to get as close as possible to the N64-llok.
While I agree that many N64 look terrible today (F-Zero X, San Francisco Rush), but I would say that N64-games hold up no worse than NES-games.
 

Tucker

“Do you happen to know how to fly this thing?”
#9
Yeah, agreed.The idea isn't to ACTUALLY make an N64-game, but it'd still be nice to be able to get as close as possible to the N64-llok.
While I agree that many N64 look terrible today (F-Zero X, San Francisco Rush), but I would say that N64-games hold up no worse than NES-games.
On that point we'd hugely disagree. Pixel-art manages to hold up for two main reasons: everyone on the platform had basically the same canvas to work with, and the framerates weren't ridiculously variable. The biggest problem with the N64 was that it was the start of major framerate drops in games. I mean, some games just slowed to a crawl. Not only that, but games like Ocarina of Time were acceptable running at a 20fps constant. At the time we overlooked this because it was true 3D (unlike what the PS was doing most of the time), but now it shows its age a lot.
 

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
#10
I like the way N64 games look, but as always it depended on the coding. Games like Goldeneye, with their awful framerate, never stood a chance.
 

Tucker

“Do you happen to know how to fly this thing?”
#11
Yeah, they're just not aging well. I remember loving everything N64 back in the day, but not now. I even find Majora's Mask annoying to play now.
 

Tucker

“Do you happen to know how to fly this thing?”
#13
You oculd get something like Banjo kazoie esque

Or you could go Conkers Bad Furday, or even Xbox graphics. lol.


Or OR you go with Rocket Robot on Wheels
I'm not sure what you're getting at about Xbox graphics there, lol.
 

Aki

Well-Known Member
#18
SNES games can still stand the tests of time while N64 / PSOne games can't. Early 3D just looks bad nowadays without all of the post effects offered through various Virtual Console services. I recently found my cartridge of OoT and I plugged in my N64 through S-Video cables, not the shitty composite, and it looked like total ass. I was actually appalled by how bad it looked because I remember that game looking straight boss. You can't say the same thing about SNES games on HDTVs because they hold up surprisingly well.
 

Tucker

“Do you happen to know how to fly this thing?”
#19
SNES games can still stand the tests of time while N64 / PSOne games can't. Early 3D just looks bad nowadays without all of the post effects offered through various Virtual Console services. I recently found my cartridge of OoT and I plugged in my N64 through S-Video cables, not the shitty composite, and it looked like total ass. I was actually appalled by how bad it looked because I remember that game looking straight boss. You can't say the same thing about SNES games on HDTVs because they hold up surprisingly well.
Nothing like Super Metroid on the Virtual Console on a Wii connected with Component - that shit is seeeeeeeeeeeeex.
 

hogge

Active Member
#20
SNES games can still stand the tests of time while N64 / PSOne games can't. Early 3D just looks bad nowadays without all of the post effects offered through various Virtual Console services. I recently found my cartridge of OoT and I plugged in my N64 through S-Video cables, not the shitty composite, and it looked like total ass. I was actually appalled by how bad it looked because I remember that game looking straight boss. You can't say the same thing about SNES games on HDTVs because they hold up surprisingly well.
I can agree for the most part. SNES games look okay even today. Super Starwars looks great, as do many other 2D games for the SNES.NES on the other hand had framerate issues as bad or even worse than on the N64. I played Goldeneye in splitscreen with a friend only a few weeks ago and the only time framerate was really bad was when someone used lots of explosives. Not to mention that many 8-bit games have issues with flickering.
 
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