Nintendo Switch Spec Thread

theMightyME

Owner of The Total Screen
I need to get me a 65iner. :mdrool:
55 is the new standard, there is a huge price bump going beyond that.... But you can get a decent 55" 4k Hdr set for less than $500 before any specials or deals.... 65" seems to jump the price quite a bit...

Another option is you could go projector and go like 120"
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
55 is the new standard, there is a huge price bump going beyond that.... But you can get a decent 55" 4k Hdr set for less than $500 before any specials or deals.... 65" seems to jump the price quite a bit...

Another option is you could go projector and go like 120"
I have gone back and forth between 55 and 65in, and part of that is that I currently own a 37in 1080p Samsung that I've owned for about a decade now (still works great!), and given the distance I sit away from it (about 7-8ft), a 55in would be a nice boost, and 65 an even better boost. Going to 65 is certainly more expensive, but I also feel you reap more of the benefits with the bigger TV as a result of 4k. If you sit closer, maybe 6ft, then 55 would be more ideal I feel, but given how far I sit, 65in might be better if I can spare it.

My plan is to hold off on getting both a Switch, and a new TV until early next year. Gotta start those new years resolutions early, amirite?

And speaking of TVs, Mighty, I trust you know about the site rtings.com? If not, tremendous source of information for TVs, as well as the different features, and little technical details that are worth knowing.
 

sjmartin79

White Phoenix of the Crown
Other than the opening cinematic, I've been playing in Handheld only, and honestly, the game is still beautiful. As I've mentioned before, playing handheld just works best with our home life.
I have not noticed anything in handheld that made me cringe.

It was definitely beautiful on the TV, but not enough of a difference in my eyes to give up multitasking in the evening.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
Other than the opening cinematic, I've been playing in Handheld only, and honestly, the game is still beautiful. As I've mentioned before, playing handheld just works best with our home life.
I have not noticed anything in handheld that made me cringe.

It was definitely beautiful on the TV, but not enough of a difference in my eyes to give up multitasking in the evening.
I think a big reason why Switch games, especially those offered by Nintendo, look as good as they do is Nintendo understands that with a smaller screen, certain details are less likely to be noticed, so they can afford to back down on those while still preserving the overall look and feel as if it were blown up onto the big screen.

I know there are YT channels that really ream Nintendo, and other developers for downgrading Switch games on handheld compared to docked mode, but ultimately it doesn't really matter when viewed on the beautiful 6in 720p screen. It's when people blow up the picture from portable mode onto a bigger screen to showcase the limitations do you really seem to notice them, and at that point it's irrelevant since it's not how the game is intended to be viewed in that fashion.
 

sjmartin79

White Phoenix of the Crown
Weird, above it says two people liked my post, but when I click on it, it only shows Shoulder. I don't remember blocking anyone, not really my style. Is that a glitch?
 

mattavelle1

IT’S GOT A DEATH RAY!
Moderator
I got a 65” HDR LG 4K installed with them hookin up my sound bar and everything.............1200 cash and I couldn’t pass that up. It has been the best investment I have made prior to a console comin out that I’ve ever made.

The switch games have looked crazy awesome, and I couldn’t have gotten an awesome sound bar at a better time.
 

theMightyME

Owner of The Total Screen
I think we paid $1600 for a 47" 1080p set just over 10 years ago

Blows my mind that we could now get a far far far better (even when made comparable to the times) 55" set for a 3rd the price

There are 2 reasons for this

1. TVs just do not sell well, the days of the mad rush to HD are gone forever... This means the assets have to price lower to increase sales... It could have gone the other way, with TVs costing way more, and not being nearly as good... But

2. Smartphones are driving display tech forward and covering R&D costs
 

GaemzDood

Well-Known Member
Odyssey had definintly shined in docked mode. I still played much of the game portable, but it did look rougher when I first started.
The game uses an awful jittering technique that reproduces a 1280x720p image standing still, but only when standing still. It completely breaks down with even slight camera movement and the lack of AA hurts it even further. The city areas are in desperate need of temporal AA. The game looks even worse than Quantum Break on Xbox One with its awful four frame blended reprojection at half the framerate aka the worst ghosting ever.

I've been advocating for developers to use half resolution reprojection techniques on Switch as an optimization, but the image should at least be presentable as to give the impression of a higher resolution.

This is Rainbow Six: Siege with just Temporal Filtering vs. Temporal Filtering with TAA.
 

Goodtwin

Well-Known Member
The game uses an awful jittering technique that reproduces a 1280x720p image standing still, but only when standing still. It completely breaks down with even slight camera movement and the lack of AA hurts it even further. The city areas are in desperate need of temporal AA. The game looks even worse than Quantum Break on Xbox One with its awful four frame blended reprojection at half the framerate aka the worst ghosting ever.

I've been advocating for developers to use half resolution reprojection techniques on Switch as an optimization, but the image should at least be presentable as to give the impression of a higher resolution.

This is Rainbow Six: Siege with just Temporal Filtering vs. Temporal Filtering with TAA.

Mario Odyssey is a curious beast in portable mode. Mario's character model becomes pixelated when moving, but this doesn't seem to happen to the world as a whole. It is as if character models drop in rendering resolution, but the environment does not. Perhaps this is a temporal reconstruction technique that struggles with moving objects. Either way, Mario Odyssey does indeed look best when docked.

Wolfenstein 2 is going to be a big challenge. The consensus so far is that it will be more demanding than Doom, so it will be interesting to see how they manage the port. Both Doom and Wolfenstein 2 run on ID Tech 6, so the learning curve with porting to Switch will be minimized. Jens Matthies creative director for Wolfenstein 2 has been quoted suggesting that Doom is a good reference point. Basically, 30fps and sub 720p are absolutely going to be necessary. Luckily, ID Tech 6 supports some slick temporal AA, and completely illuminated jaggies in Doom on Switch, even if it did come at the cost of being a bit blurry.
 

GaemzDood

Well-Known Member
Mario Odyssey is a curious beast in portable mode. Mario's character model becomes pixelated when moving, but this doesn't seem to happen to the world as a whole. It is as if character models drop in rendering resolution, but the environment does not. Perhaps this is a temporal reconstruction technique that struggles with moving objects. Either way, Mario Odyssey does indeed look best when docked.

Wolfenstein 2 is going to be a big challenge. The consensus so far is that it will be more demanding than Doom, so it will be interesting to see how they manage the port. Both Doom and Wolfenstein 2 run on ID Tech 6, so the learning curve with porting to Switch will be minimized. Jens Matthies creative director for Wolfenstein 2 has been quoted suggesting that Doom is a good reference point. Basically, 30fps and sub 720p are absolutely going to be necessary. Luckily, ID Tech 6 supports some slick temporal AA, and completely illuminated jaggies in Doom on Switch, even if it did come at the cost of being a bit blurry.
DOOM was also developed in conjunction with Rocket League. That said, considering the optimization issues Wolfenstein II had on other console platforms, I won't doubt that the Switch version will have issues. Hopefully, they take advantage of Vulkan and FP16.
 

GaemzDood

Well-Known Member
@GaemzDood Figured you'd appreciate this, since you love dissecting the innards of video games

https://www.reddit.com/r/NintendoSw..._tech_analysis_of_botw_graphics_engine_local/
How the FUCK did they do that on the Wii U? At native 720p (most of the time) no less. The only other open world game that does that sort of tech on PS3 and 360 is MGSV (even that doesn't use volumetric lighting, SSR, or bokeh depth of field), and that's only 992x720p and almost never hit 30 FPS.

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GaemzDood

Well-Known Member
Also, the depth of field effect flickers like a mofo. The game really should have had temporal AA and temporal filtering. It wouldn't have been possible on Wii U since they stretched what that console could do in addition to the extremely low fill rate and GPU bandwidth (which is evidenced by the usage of a double buffer v-sync), but it should have been possible on Switch.

The lack of Switch exclusive graphical improvements backs up my theory that the game was ported to the Switch as an afterthought. When you look at another launch title like Fast RMX (a game that also strangely didn't have AA) and the fact that the Switch port still uses a double buffer v-sync, it reinforces my belief further.

I would have liked to see things like parallax occlusion mapping, at least some anisotropic filtering, vertex displacement shading for water, and per object motion blur in addition to TAA. Besides the TAA all of these are nitpicky, although per object blur with a decent sample rate would have really helped parts where the frame rate drops.

Something that really would have helped the actual core gameplay would be triple buffering on Switch. Double buffer v-sync sucks ass.

Edit: Considering that DOOM uses similar tech in what mostly amounts to corridors, I really wonder why the resolution is as low as it is. Wolfenstein II uses tons of volumetrics for light and fog, so it will be interesting to see how they do that on Switch since Breath of the Wild does it in abundance too.

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GaemzDood

Well-Known Member
The atmospheric scattering that actually takes real color depth into account is amazing. The only other Switch launch title that did this was Fast RMX.

I remember I made a post about how I want Nintendo to go back to making graphically impressive games like they did during the GameCube era. It looks like they've done that. Hopefully Xenoblade Chronicles 2 uses these rendering features found in Breath of the Wild.

Also, @Shoulder, that same guy made an excellent analysis of Mario Odyssey.

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theMightyME

Owner of The Total Screen
so @GaemzDood , what do you think is the msot technically impressive feat on the Switch so far... I don't mean overall best looking game, just what has impressed you on a technical level the most... doesn't have to a be a full game... either, it could be a single trick, just curious

what has made you go "this should not be possible"
 

GaemzDood

Well-Known Member
That's a hard pick. Unlike the Wii U, the Switch actually has a lot of games that impressed me.

- Mario + Rabbids shocked me with how impressive it was. Every rendering feature from The Division made it over unscathed.

- Fast RMX is an easy one. Whereas the Wii U version operated with a hideous frame blended reprojection algorithm that produced ghosting, pixelation, and interlacing artifacts everywhere, the Switch version ditched all of that and also completely reworked the rendering pipeline. Anyone who says the Switch undocked isn't a major step up from the Wii U can look no further than Fast RMX, a game that went from 640x720p on Wii U to 1280x720p undocked in addition to featuring real time atmospheric scattering (the Wii U version faked it with a screen space effect, hence why a lot of colors look oversaturated), dynamic headlights, and image based lighting for cars that updates at 60 FPS. Not even Forza 7 on Xbox One X updates image based car reflections at 60 FPS, and Gran Turismo Sport does it dynamically.

- Splatoon 2 may not look like it, but it's a massive step up visually from the first game. It's obviously using physically based rendering with fresnel calculations now, which you can tell by the excellent squid materials (and the extreme shimmering owing to the specular everywhere and lack of TAA). Character models are also of a way higher polygon count now and I actually haven't noticed any blockiness, suggesting maybe a form of adaptive tessellation. The paint also dynamically displaces, as Digital Foundry even noted, and that impressed me too. Shadows are also real time now as opposed to the baked solution on Wii U. The game also runs at a peak of 1080p and 720p docked and undocked while staying locked to 60 FPS, which impressed me. The 30 FPS hub area is where the visuals shine. The aliasing and shimmering is cleaned up, there's no resolution scaling, and there's even some cool visual touches like cube map reflections.

The game also makes great use of bokeh depth of field, and there's no flickering or haloing. Haloing in depth of field should be outlawed, but some games like Mass Effect: Andromeda still do it. Weigh your samples!

- ARMS has extremely clean image quality, which surprised me since it's a 60 FPS Nintendo game. Then again, it's a one on one fighter.

- Super Mario Odyssey is a beautiful game outside of the city areas. The city is pretty ugly and features shimmering so bad it would make Alien: Isolation jealous. Nintendo needs to start embracing temporal supersampling for their games pronto, it's not even like it's not possible on Switch.

That aside, the game is beautiful and really shows that physically based rendering can do in terms of stylized art design. Nintendo really knows their PBR. All of the textures, which are actually generated through physically based shaders (meaning they don't have typical surface detail but are top tier in terms of refraction, reflection, and light interaction quality), are convincing too. The game also makes great use of global illumination light bouncing with color bleeding and HDR lighting. It also makes use of cube maps and image based lighting from reflective sources and global lighting for everything, including water, which also realistically displaces unlike Breath of the Wild. Some areas also make use of emmisive lights (lava) along with volumetric lighting (https://mobile.twitter.com/brainchildlight/status/924931027637739520/video/1) that interacts with 3D lit particles. I'm not sure if these are GPU accelerated or not. Also, no color banding! Hooray!

Suffice to say, an open world Switch game targeting 900p and 60 FPS with things like deferred rendering (there is no way this is a forward render, not with this amount of light sources), 3D lit particles, and volumetric lighting is no small feat, and it makes developers like EA with their pitiful FIFA "18" port look pathetic in comparison; I still don't even know how people defend that.

Nintendo, if you're listening to me, make a Switch with an 8 core high clock CPU and Tegra Xavier (or preferably, use one of Nvidia's GTX 1060 6 GB onwards chips) that supports HDR. Mario Odyssey would look amazing in HDR.

- DOOM is impressive owing to it being DOOM. The lack of frame skipping in addition to improper frame pacing are notable issues, but they can be patched. The game doesn't feel as optimized for docked gaming as it could have been, but statistically, almost all Switch users play it portably so it makes sense to focus on the portable aspect in the limited amount of time they had since that's the main selling point. As a portable shooter, there's nothing like it. The color banding is notable and I didn't expect it, but that can be patched too. As the Switch's first major AAA 3rd party experiment, it's a solid effort that's 100% content complete and generally runs well, which can't be said about tripe on Wii like Call of Duty 3 at 20 FPS average and Far Cry: Vengeance, and the Wii U's many porting disasters. It goes to show just how streamlined Nintendo made the development process, and how they actually pragmatically listened to 3rd party developers (see: adding RAM because of Capcom), something their old CEOs never ever did.
 
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GaemzDood

Well-Known Member
Also, am I the only one that finds it strange that Breath of the Wild uses both dynamic volumetric lighting and simulated global illumination while The Witcher 3 uses screen space light shafts and no GI at all?

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GaemzDood

Well-Known Member
I'm disappointed in LA Noire's Switch port. In fact, I'd argue that it's the first AAA port that's in line with the quality of some of Wii U's ports. Yes, some indie ports like Overcooked and Rime sucked, and FIFA was a trainwreck, but generally, Switch's ports have been solid, with titles like NBA 2K, Skyrim, and WWE 18 being based on the current gen releases. Hopefully, this doesn't set a trend of developers releasing bad ports and canning support based on said bad ports aka what happened with the Wii U. Yes, the Switch is successful, but aside from Bethesda, nobody is really going all out with it. Hopefully, Bethesda's experiment pays off and the industry notices.

+ First off, let's start with the positives. Ambient occlusion is completely reworked compared to the halo-y mess on PS3. However, this is only when docked, not portable aka how most people play Switch. Textures and texture filtering are boosted. However, there's a catch to that too: texture boosts only apply to roads and texture filtering is gimped when playing in portable mode. - Other than that, textures, including faces, are identical to PS3.

- Portable mode actually runs at a lower resolution than PS3. It was fine in Skyrim because they added a ton of new effects and it actually runs at a solid framerate, but in LA Noire, they actually made some stuff worse (no ambient occlusion at all in portable; at least PS3 has it).

- The draw distance is worse on Switch than PS3, which is inexcusable, but I'll get to that.

- Performance is worse than on PS3.

- No frame skipping and poor frame pacing. Neither of these were issues on PS3. Yes, this was in DOOM too, but in DOOM's defense, the developers are making a patch and it only applies to Arcade on Ultra Nightmare. This makes chase sequences awful to play since it runs at almost half the speed, and poor frame pacing actually strains my eyes. It's why I choose to use the 30 FPS cap in games that offer unlocked framerates (Ethan Carter, Infamous, Killzone).

- Effects like color grading, reflections, and depth of field are pulled from PS3, even when docked.

- There's weird visual glitches not on PS3. There's a scene during a firefight where Cole's window is shot and it doesn't break on Switch.

Honestly, I can't say that I'm surprised for a couple of reasons. Hear me out.

1. This game was built using the PS3's Cell SPUs in mind. It's why the 360 and PC ports were also quite terrible. Adapting a game designed around the Cell to Tegra hardware in a couple of months is no small feat since the game basically pulled off all of its technical feats through the SPUs. HOWEVER, that begs the question of why the hell they would port over the complicated PS3 code when they would save a lot of time by using PC code aka what they did with the PS4 and Xbox One. With the other versions, Rockstar basically took the PC port and reworked it. With the Switch, they used PS3 code. This is incredibly inept. Not even Naughty Dog was able to port over a PS3 game to PS4 in less than 8 months, and even that suffered from performance issues. The PS3 was a mess of a console, and anyone using code from a PS3 game when they have access to a PC version deserves to be called out.

2. The excuse that they were testing to make sure M rated games would have an audience on the system isn't really a good defense. The Binding of Isaac was one of the best selling Switch launch games, even outselling Breath of the Wild for a couple of weeks, and DOOM and Skyrim are topping Switch charts at GameStop, Best Buy, and Nintendo's eShop. The fact is that Nintendo is marketing M rated titles now, including this mess of a port, and the average age and gaming habits of the typical Switch user is much closer to the PS4 and Xbox One than the 3DS or Wii U. The Switch has an audience for M rated games now and their new CEO is actually encouraging developers to make these sorts of games for Switch, it's not just Nintendo-or-die people and children now.

Like I said in Jueg's thread, testing the waters is fine if the ports are good. It's why Skyrim deserves to be supported.


Up next: how I would port GTA V to Switch.

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GaemzDood

Well-Known Member
Grand Theft Auto V is a special game to me, and I feel that Switch users deserve a special port. Here's how I would tackle a GTA V Switch port. Hopefully Rockstar is reading this.

- First of all, I would redesign the game to work with Vulkan. I don't feel like explaining Vulkan, so read this thread on Game Dev Stack Exchange. Basically, it provides way more control over the game for optimization purposes.
[https://gamedev.stackexchange.com/questions/96014/what-is-vulkan-and-how-does-it-differ-from-opengl]

- Resolution would be dynamic, with the vertical axis locked at 1080 while the horizontal axis runs anywhere between 50% (960) to 100% (1920), this is because I want to maintain a solid 30 FPS 99% of the time and it would be based on current generation ports visually (with cutbacks like foliage density, particles (as seen below), etc.), with all of their visual enhancements that would be too long to read. This would be backed up with a temporal supersampling solution as opposed to the post process anti-aliasing in the other versions in order to minimize shimmering caused by resolution transitions as well as the renderer.

- I would use Criterion's method of tackling input lag from Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit, which is clamping simulation routes to both GPU and CPU in parallel while waiting for v-sync to update (this was also done in Warhammer 40k: Space Marine iirc, highly underrated game). I would also implement an adaptive v-sync solution to avoid frame time spikes during fast traversal.

- Half resolution particles.

- For the ambient occlusion, I would use a half res buffer resampled and pointed at the sky. I would use a method based on Line-Sweep Ambient Obscurance (refer to the paper on it, it's outside the scope of this post).

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GaemzDood

Well-Known Member
Xenoblade 2 is 720p docked and 368p to 500-something-p undocked with constant slowdown. Normally, I would use this as proof to declare that Nintendo needs to release a mid-gen refresh, but seeing as how Breath of the Wild uses the same tech with some of its own advantages (dynamic volumetric lighting, dynamic reactive grass, dynamic shadows, dynamic wind) while operating at a higher framerate and a much higher resolution, I would say that the game was rushed to meet a holiday deadline.

That said, the game does use temporal AA while BotW had no AA, which really hurt the image in BotW since the game was filled to the brim with specular and also used physically based shading, like Xenoblade 2. So one could argue that when docked, Xenoblade 2's 720p image looks cleaner than Breath of the Wild's 900p. That said, Xenoblade also uses an aggressive sharpening filter (think Deus Ex: Mankind Divided) which kills the IQ.

Side Note: Seeing Nintendo and their affiliated developers embrace physically based rendering warms my heart.

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GaemzDood

Well-Known Member
I saw a thread on IGN's Nintendo board about whether Nier: Automata could even run on the Switch after the developers hinting that they would do it provided Square funded it.

It could, even at 60 FPS provided other tweaks were made (dynamic res scaling (756p to 900p docked, something below 720 to 720 undocked), aggressive LOD culling, lower res alpha effects, etc.). However, the overkill global illumination system, which basically uses no LOD culling on its Ultra preset (128, which is what the PS4/Pro versions use, hence the performance/resolution issues), would have to be tweaked down to 48, which is between Medium (32) and High (64). Below that, it starts to look crappy, but 48 is the same as High/Ultra except that it removes GI on distant objects, which actually saves a ton of performance and it isn't even noticable.

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Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear

Have to say, Panic Button are quite the wizards in being able to port seemingly impossible games onto the Switch with DOOM being the first, and now this. I say impossible because Unreal Engine 3, which is what Rocket League uses, is not supported by the Switch, so PB basically had to port it from scratch, which is no easy feat, even though UE3 is not necessarily the most demanding engine out there.

I like how framerate was prioritized, and given their work for DOOM, and this, it makes me very interested in what they'll be able to accomplish with Wolfenstein: The New Colossus next year.
 

Goodtwin

Well-Known Member
Panic Button is quickly becoming the go to studio for ports to Switch. They are already working on a third port with Wolfenstein 2.

Unreal 3 doesn't natively support Switch, but I am sure it wasn't insanely difficult thanks to the Tegra X1 being an off the shelf part. That said Unreal 3 was never the most efficient game for 60fps games. So getting the most out of Switch while maintaining Unreal 3 was never in the cards. So Rocket League isn't the greatest looker on Switch, it plays great and retains the experience.

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GaemzDood

Well-Known Member
Part of me says the resolution disparity was due to, like you said, the Switch not supporting UE3 natively. The Flame in the Flood, an UE4 game, runs at 900p and up to 60 FPS docked, and 672p with the same framerate undocked.

I'm still worried about Wolfenstein II though. The game is considerably more demanding than DOOM and has issues on all other platforms, including PC and Xbox One X. The standard Xbox One version's resolution scaler tops off at 1440x810p, which seems like more of an issue of developers saying "lol who gives a shit nobody plays the xbone anymore" and just releasing half baked products (that's an issue for another time), and the game brute forces draw calls and has insane levels of overdraw because reasons.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
Part of me says the resolution disparity was due to, like you said, the Switch not supporting UE3 natively. The Flame in the Flood, an UE4 game, runs at 900p and up to 60 FPS docked, and 672p with the same framerate undocked.

I'm still worried about Wolfenstein II though. The game is considerably more demanding than DOOM and has issues on all other platforms, including PC and Xbox One X. The standard Xbox One version's resolution scaler tops off at 1440x810p, which seems like more of an issue of developers saying "lol who gives a shit nobody plays the xbone anymore" and just releasing half baked products (that's an issue for another time), and the game brute forces draw calls and has insane levels of overdraw because reasons.
I trust Panic Button to bring us an experience that is on par with DOOM, given they'll have a better grasp of the hardware, and the engine to better optimize for it, despite Wolfenstein being a more demanding game.
 

theMightyME

Owner of The Total Screen
I just learned they're based in Austin, TX. Must be something in the water there for pushing Nintendo hardware.

...or it's just the good barbecue.
There are only a few areas with major game development scenes, Austin is one of them, as is Santa Monica, Tokyo, etc...

Because there is a scene, that means people move around between companies there, so Panic Button likely has some ex Retro staff and vice versa
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
There are only a few areas with major game development scenes, Austin is one of them, as is Santa Monica, Tokyo, etc...

Because there is a scene, that means people move around between companies there, so Panic Button likely has some ex Retro staff and vice versa
http://www.panicbuttongames.com/previous-titles.php

Panic Button are industry veterans across all staples of game development. They are seriously talented folks.
 

GaemzDood

Well-Known Member
Reading Digital Foundry's LA Noire Switch comparison really shows that they should just stick to performance metrics. Their comments about the Switch CPU vs. the PS3's stick out like a sore thumb. In regards to the "clock speed" argument, clocks correlates with execution speed. Clock speed is basically a drum beat to keep the different parts of a CPU in sync. For one thing, the Switch has a higher IPC (same as the Jaguars if I recall correctly, correct me if I'm wrong) and isn't as bottlenecked by pipeline bubbles. In addition to that, the PS3's CELL requires much more instructions to complete simple cycles. This PS3 SPU secret sauce argument needs to die. The SPUs weren't secret sauce, they were pretty much the only way to get a PS3 game running smoothly (see: Uncharted: Drake's Fortune vs. Uncharted 2).

For fucks sake, even John Carmack dispelled the "PS3 is a beast!" myth.


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theMightyME

Owner of The Total Screen
Reading Digital Foundry's LA Noire Switch comparison really shows that they should just stick to performance metrics. Their comments about the Switch CPU vs. the PS3's stick out like a sore thumb. In regards to the "clock speed" argument, clocks correlates with execution speed. Clock speed is basically a drum beat to keep the different parts of a CPU in sync. For one thing, the Switch has a higher IPC (same as the Jaguars if I recall correctly, correct me if I'm wrong) and isn't as bottlenecked by pipeline bubbles. In addition to that, the PS3's CELL requires much more instructions to complete simple cycles. This PS3 SPU secret sauce argument needs to die. The SPUs weren't secret sauce, they were pretty much the only way to get a PS3 game running smoothly (see: Uncharted: Drake's Fortune vs. Uncharted 2).

For fucks sake, even John Carmack dispelled the "PS3 is a beast!" myth.


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Even? He is like THE authority, in the entire world, on how tech impacts performance in gaming

There is nobody I would trust more in that field

Though as I always say

Art>Tech when it comes to any form of entertainment

And not by a little bit either

Carmack is THE authority on tech in gaming, but his overall position in the industry isn't even close to that of Miyamoto, Kojima, Kamiya, Suda, etc
 

GaemzDood

Well-Known Member
Even? He is like THE authority, in the entire world, on how tech impacts performance in gaming

There is nobody I would trust more in that field

Though as I always say

Art>Tech when it comes to any form of entertainment

And not by a little bit either

Carmack is THE authority on tech in gaming, but his overall position in the industry isn't even close to that of Miyamoto, Kojima, Kamiya, Suda, etc
I know, hence the "even" was meant to emphasize that.

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GaemzDood

Well-Known Member
I really wonder how Switch is going to handle Blighttown in Dark Souls since we already have confirmation that it's 30 FPS. I'm hoping that since it's only 30, they'll try and restore the visual quality seen in the Dark Souls II E3 deception build.

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Goodtwin

Well-Known Member
I really wonder how Switch is going to handle Blighttown in Dark Souls since we already have confirmation that it's 30 FPS. I'm hoping that since it's only 30, they'll try and restore the visual quality seen in the Dark Souls II E3 deception build.

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The game having its roots in the 360/PS3 era should make for a pretty easy upgrade on Switch. 900p with enhanced lighting and textures seem to be pretty easy to implement. I think Skyrim was sort of the blueprint on just how much more capable Switch is than last gen hardware. It is actually pretty darn good really. The fact is the PS4 and X1 were selling early on by offering a lot of enhanced ports of last gen games, while Switch cant enhance them to the same extent, they are enhanced versions just the same, and its on portable hardware. Wii U was a well though out design when holding on to the legacy hardware dating back to the Gamecube, but Switch breaking complete ties that tech obviously benefited the hardware and software in a significant way. The A57 cores may not crush those Wii U CPU cores in terms of integer performance, but they do absolutely destroy them in floating point performance. The out of order capabilities are far more advanced as well. While the PPC750 was indeed OoO, it was very limited by comparison.

I have said for a long time that Nvidia developed the Tegra X1 for Nintendo well before they new it. The Tegra X1 was in no mans lands, and on the verge of being a bust. Then here comes Nintendo with a product that fits perfectly with the Tegra X1. Too hot for phones and tablets, but a portable console that has active cooling and suddenly that chip is right in its element.
 

simplyTravis

Lamer Gamers Podcast Co-Host
We haven't seen the comeuppance of the Netflix app and that had me wondering, why? Going through all the newer Netflix shows I realized that they are pushing everything to 4K and HDR. As of this moment the Switch doesn't provide a 4K option, but it technically can. There is already a Tegra device that pumps out 4k called the Nvidia Shield TV. You will find similar specs to the Switch. It has the same GPU but the Switch has a weaker CPU. Nintendo stated they are focused on games right now but it could be that they didn't want to mess with the output settings in the graphics driver for the Switch until later. This would help to avoid issues with game companies that were learning how to program for the Switch until they have a little more knowledge.

So, do you think we'll see a 4K option coming up on a Netflix app? I think it would be a good idea for Netflix to have 720 on the go and 4k in the dock. It would also help Nintendo show they are capable of quite a bit of power that people would not expect from this magic tablet.
 

GaemzDood

Well-Known Member
This is for the Wii U, but where else am I going to have a chance to share and talk about this one?


@Goodtwin @GaemzDood
The Wii U has insanely low memory bandwidth, so low that developers often had to resort to the eDRAM to supplement memory for simple tasks like texture filtering (Fast Racing NEO did this). Overdraw heavy games like Bayonetta 2 suffered heavy for this. Had Nintendo not included 32MB of eDRAM in the first place, the system would have been totally gimped.

Also, interesting facts about Bayonetta 2: the game uses real time mirrors (mostly reserved for 30 FPS cutscenes), global illumination, way more dynamic lights and shadows (this is why shadows looked more jagged than Bayo 1, which heavily baked them in), screen space light shafts, and screen space ambient occlusion. AFAIK, the game also uses full resolution alpha, correct me if I'm wrong.
 

GaemzDood

Well-Known Member
The game having its roots in the 360/PS3 era should make for a pretty easy upgrade on Switch. 900p with enhanced lighting and textures seem to be pretty easy to implement. I think Skyrim was sort of the blueprint on just how much more capable Switch is than last gen hardware. It is actually pretty darn good really. The fact is the PS4 and X1 were selling early on by offering a lot of enhanced ports of last gen games, while Switch cant enhance them to the same extent, they are enhanced versions just the same, and its on portable hardware. Wii U was a well though out design when holding on to the legacy hardware dating back to the Gamecube, but Switch breaking complete ties that tech obviously benefited the hardware and software in a significant way. The A57 cores may not crush those Wii U CPU cores in terms of integer performance, but they do absolutely destroy them in floating point performance. The out of order capabilities are far more advanced as well. While the PPC750 was indeed OoO, it was very limited by comparison.

I have said for a long time that Nvidia developed the Tegra X1 for Nintendo well before they new it. The Tegra X1 was in no mans lands, and on the verge of being a bust. Then here comes Nintendo with a product that fits perfectly with the Tegra X1. Too hot for phones and tablets, but a portable console that has active cooling and suddenly that chip is right in its element.
They said the game would be 1080p though. However, I imagine it'll be dynamic like L.A. Noire.
 
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