Photography Enthusiast

the_randomizer

Well-Known Member
#51
Foxes are very timid animals and avoid people in the wild, they're like "meh", attacking is a last resort, but in her case, she'll lick your hands till they fall off ROFL XDD. I hope the pics help at least dispel some of the myths about foxes and how they're perfectly safe to be around ;)

Hmm....perhaps I should make a blog entry pertaining to the truth about tamed foxes :D
 

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
#52
Domesticated foxes seem super cool. I would consider getting one at some point, but I imagine they are probably much higher maintenance than dogs, since there are no specialized vets, food, medicine, etc. Might just be a misconception on my part, though.
 

the_randomizer

Well-Known Member
#53
They are, tamed/domestic foxes are wonderful animals, but very high maintenance and have an odd musk to them, there are vets that can take care of them, but are hard to find. I also love photographing/recording videos of them, hence the samples of the kinda of work I do with my camera. :D Food, they need raw meat, high quality dog food and no chocolate (like a dog). I know a few people who own foxes and met them too! Anyways, I don't want to get in trouble for derailing, I think I'll definitely make a separate thread for fluffeh foxehs.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#54
Since we have a fox in this thread, I'd like to add a cat, specifically one of my friends' cats, Lily. This was taken three years ago.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#59

I will admit, I'm guilty of some of these things, such as the lens hood, because I do have a lens hood for all my lens with the exception of my Helios lens. But the other things, such as ISO, tack sharp photos, using a phone, mirrorless cameras, are totally fine in this day and age. I also do use P mode when I'm more interested in just getting a shot rather than concern myself always about settings. There are times when you have to just be spontaneous and take the shot, or it'll be over if you take too much time getting the settings right.

Also, when I do change lenses, I do angle the camera downward as to not get dust in there, HOWEVER dust is inevitable with interchangeable lenses, so make sure your dust cleaning feature is switched on, so when powering on and off it can do so.

If you're serious about using DLRs or mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras, invest in one of these:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/318545-REG/Giottos_AA1910_Rocket_Air_Blower.html

Whenever I'm done with a shoot outside, or it's been awhile since my last time, just give your lenses and sensor a cleaning. When you manually clean your sensor via the blower method, be sure to angle the camera down as if there's any dust, it should fall. And just as another tip, do this in the bathroom as it's probably the most dust-free area of your house/apartment.
 

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
#63
WTF happened to the pics I uploaded? Lol.
Apparently the guy hired to do the transition to xenforo had originally deleted them, but we managed to get them back. However, because they were only attached, but not embedded through a direct url link in the posts bodies, they are not visible anymore. But they should be safe and sound in storage, and if we make them available for everyone to download through dropbox, for example, they can simply be reuploaded or referenced so that they appear again, either by users or by we mods.

EDIT: Actually, I figured out how to do this. Give me a few mins and I'll pull up what I can.
 

the_randomizer

Well-Known Member
#64
Apparently the guy hired to do the transition to xenforo had originally deleted them, but we managed to get them back. However, because they were only attached, but not embedded through a direct url link in the posts bodies, they are not visible anymore. But they should be safe and sound in storage, and if we make them available for everyone to download through dropbox, for example, they can simply be reuploaded or referenced so that they appear again, either by users or by we mods.

EDIT: Actually, I figured out how to do this. Give me a few mins and I'll pull up what I can.
Sorry for being impatient, I wasn't entirely sure what happened, but at least I know why now. My mistake :D
 

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
#65
I went through the entire folder of images we recovered, and I couldn't find the fox images anymore. I guess the backup was made before you posted those images, so they were lost. Sorry about that.

But if you want to, you can reupload them again. I doubt we'll be making another forum switch for a very long time, and in any case next time we would definitely be much more careful about backing up such images.
 

the_randomizer

Well-Known Member
#66
I went through the entire folder of images we recovered, and I couldn't find the fox images anymore. I guess the backup was made before you posted those images, so they were lost. Sorry about that.

But if you want to, you can reupload them again. I doubt we'll be making another forum switch for a very long time, and in any case next time we would definitely be much more careful about backing up such images.
It's fine, I only uploaded four or so, not a big deal. I can always copy the image URL directly now :D

Here's some from an outing I went to on Wednesday:




 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#67
I went through the entire folder of images we recovered, and I couldn't find the fox images anymore. I guess the backup was made before you posted those images, so they were lost. Sorry about that.

But if you want to, you can reupload them again. I doubt we'll be making another forum switch for a very long time, and in any case next time we would definitely be much more careful about backing up such images.
If you happen to have the time, reuploading some of the images I put up (that is if they are on that back-up) would be great, but don't prioritize it over other important things. Like I said, I plan on uploading more photos on my flickr account, so I can always link them for those who wish to see them. :)
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#69
I'm pretty certain I didn't see anything from photography enthusiast in the folder. I juse remember seeing so much spiderman that I don't even know if I dreamt it.
No worries. :)

It'll give me the opportunity to finally upload my past photos online, so I'll probably make another post referencing those then.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#72
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Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#79
I don't always take selfies, but when I do, I make it look like it's not a selfie.



Here's a photo of myself from three years ago that I attached. I was taking some photos when in Scotland, and while in the hotel room, I noticed the mirror was rather large, so I simply composed myself so the outline of the mirror wasn't in the photo. In post-processing, I converted it to B&W, and I then flipped the image, so it wouldn't look like I was in the mirror. So to some eagle eye viewers, the letters are not backwards, but going in the right direction, so you'd almost think it was taken by someone else. My point is if you have to use a mirror for a selfie, flip the image to make it look like it wasn't taken in the mirror. Just my thoughts.
 

Attachments

the_randomizer

Well-Known Member
#90
Some other pics I enjoy, some I took when I lived in Japan back in 2006, an awesome place to be sure!


Maizuru, Kyoto prefecture, taken in June 2006


Horyuuji Temple, Nara prefecture, May 2007


Kagawa prefecture (Shikoku), June 2006

Plenty more where that came from!
 

the_randomizer

Well-Known Member
#92
Wow these are real nice! Nice picture taking skills!
Thank you! Glad you enjoy the pics, I'm surprised how well those pics from that camera look, even back seven/eight years :D A few more



Cool dragon statue, the water is used to purify hands not for drinking


Five-storied pagoda, and this goes to show how ridiculously green it gets there, like, it adds to the awesome aura of Japan


Outside my apartment complex in downtown Kashihara, Nara prefecture, June 2007; the city itself has about 200,000 people or so


Todaiji (Great Eastern Temple), one of the largest wooden structures in Japan, located in Nara park, June 2007
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#93

Lots of very interesting photos. Just imagine the time that these photos were created. The Civil War had not happened yet, nor had the Gold rush. And then you see the people in those pictures, and wonder just what sort of lives they had during that time. The idea that someone could "paint" a picture using a new sophisticated device without the need for a paint brush. That's certainly something. Early on, it was said that a photographic camera was going to steal your soul or something, and thus many refused to have themselves photographed as a result. It was certainly a different time and place.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#95
In an optimal world, highest resolution and lowest ISO is what you want, especially in sunny conditions. If you haven't heard or used it yet, following the Sunny 16 rule has been a good standard for what sort of settings to use in specific conditions. Granted, those were around during the old days of manual film cameras, but it can still apply in today's photography world.
 

the_randomizer

Well-Known Member
#96
In an optimal world, highest resolution and lowest ISO is what you want, especially in sunny conditions. If you haven't heard or used it yet, following the Sunny 16 rule has been a good standard for what sort of settings to use in specific conditions. Granted, those were around during the old days of manual film cameras, but it can still apply in today's photography world.
Yeah, this particular camera, the lowest I can manually set the ISO speed is 125 (the darker the area, the higher the ISO should be), there's AUTO but it doesn't always choose the best. For resolution, I can have a maximum of 16 megapixels, currently set to 8, wouldn't 16 MP show more of the flaws of the digital imagery (as in more pixellation and grainy appearance)? So far, 8 MP is good enough for what I do, but I need to mess around and experiment more.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#97
Yeah, this particular camera, the lowest I can manually set the ISO speed is 125 (the darker the area, the higher the ISO should be), there's AUTO but it doesn't always choose the best. For resolution, I can have a maximum of 16 megapixels, currently set to 8, wouldn't 16 MP show more of the flaws of the digital imagery (as in more pixellation and grainy appearance)? So far, 8 MP is good enough for what I do, but I need to mess around and experiment more.
It honestly will depend on the camera, but all megapixels mean is how large the picture is. The more megapixels, the bigger the picture, no surprise there. But in some cases, especially when dealing with photos with a lot of detail or small objects, having more resolution is a good way to see more detail. It's sort of counterintuitive because detail can mean two different things such as seeing the strands of fabric on a couch, or also making out an object in the distance.

Of course, when dealing with bigger photos, that also comes with using more space on your memory card and harddrive, so you cannot take or store as many photos. But there are some other advantages for higher resolution photos, such as cropping, which can mean the differences from having an ok photo, to a great photo. It can also help you experiment with framing your subjects (remember the Rule of Thirds?), or finding where you want the horizon when dealing with landscapes. For landscapes, never have the horizon smack dab in the middle of the picture. Try to emphasize either what's above or below the horizon, depending on what you're actually trying to shoot, and what you believe the viewer should see.

Now having said all this, if you're just going to take normal point-and-shoots, then 8MP should be fine. Hell, for the vast majority of photographers or people who just want a camera to shoot with, 12MP is probably the most you'll ever truly need.
 

the_randomizer

Well-Known Member
#98
It honestly will depend on the camera, but all megapixels mean is how large the picture is. The more megapixels, the bigger the picture, no surprise there. But in some cases, especially when dealing with photos with a lot of detail or small objects, having more resolution is a good way to see more detail. It's sort of counterintuitive because detail can mean two different things such as seeing the strands of fabric on a couch, or also making out an object in the distance.

Of course, when dealing with bigger photos, that also comes with using more space on your memory card and harddrive, so you cannot take or store as many photos. But there are some other advantages for higher resolution photos, such as cropping, which can mean the differences from having an ok photo, to a great photo. It can also help you experiment with framing your subjects (remember the Rule of Thirds?), or finding where you want the horizon when dealing with landscapes. For landscapes, never have the horizon smack dab in the middle of the picture. Try to emphasize either what's above or below the horizon, depending on what you're actually trying to shoot, and what you believe the viewer should see.

Now having said all this, if you're just going to take normal point-and-shoots, then 8MP should be fine. Hell, for the vast majority of photographers or people who just want a camera to shoot with, 12MP is probably the most you'll ever truly need.
It's a Nikon Coolpix L820, a bridge camera (not quite SLR and not quite point-n-shoot), pictures on this look helluva lot better than they did on my older Olympus (that's a given lol). Turns out there is a 12 MP mode that crops the pictures in 16:9 aspect ratio, as well as shooting in full HD at 30 fps if I so choose :p I want to test that resolution more often, to see since I've never really used 12 MP yet; not exactly super good at taking pics, I often interact with wildlife at sanctuaries and take pictures of the exotic animals, mostly happy playful foxes, just to see what emotions I can capture on camera. Trouble is in many of those, I don't hold still enough and get blurry pics, and it annoys me that I have trouble in that regard, but having a flash on (even outdoors) might help reduce that.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#99
It's a Nikon Coolpix L820, a bridge camera (not quite SLR and not quite point-n-shoot), pictures on this look helluva lot better than they did on my older Olympus (that's a given lol). Turns out there is a 12 MP mode that crops the pictures in 16:9 aspect ratio, as well as shooting in full HD at 30 fps if I so choose :p I want to test that resolution more often, to see since I've never really used 12 MP yet; not exactly super good at taking pics, I often interact with wildlife at sanctuaries and take pictures of the exotic animals, mostly happy playful foxes, just to see what emotions I can capture on camera. Trouble is in many of those, I don't hold still enough and get blurry pics, and it annoys me that I have trouble in that regard, but having a flash on (even outdoors) might help reduce that.
I would recommend to almost never using the built-in flash as it will 99% of the time wash out your photos and make them look meh in my opinion. Only in extreme circumstances would I ever use it. As far as having trouble holding it steady, hold your elbows in tight against your torso to help reduce shake. There are many ways to help reduce shake, including wrapping your strap around your elbow, which I've been using for years.

Here's a link to some ways to help increase stability:

http://www.adorama.com/alc/0012965/article/Six-Ways-to-Hand-Hold-Your-Camera

If you use a combo of keeping your elbows in tight while having it wrapped around your elbow/arm, you'll reduce a good amount of possible shake.
 

the_randomizer

Well-Known Member
I would recommend to almost never using the built-in flash as it will 99% of the time wash out your photos and make them look meh in my opinion. Only in extreme circumstances would I ever use it. As far as having trouble holding it steady, hold your elbows in tight against your torso to help reduce shake. There are many ways to help reduce shake, including wrapping your strap around your elbow, which I've been using for years.

Here's a link to some ways to help increase stability:

http://www.adorama.com/alc/0012965/article/Six-Ways-to-Hand-Hold-Your-Camera

If you use a combo of keeping your elbows in tight while having it wrapped around your elbow/arm, you'll reduce a good amount of possible shake.
I had better luck this morning (no flash either), and it most pictures turned out very well, even the 12 megapixel ones look fantastic, I think that right there will be the highest I'll want to go as 16 MP is overkill for what I do (wildlife sanctuary), 12 MP is limited to a 16:9 aspect ratio, not a deal breaker for me really. Don't have a strap on for the camera, but I'm sure they make them for the Coolpix series :p
 
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