Photography Enthusiast

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
I had better luck this morning (no flash either), and it most pictures turned out very well, even the 12 megapixel ones look fantastic, I think that right there will be the highest I'll want to go as 16 MP is overkill for what I do (wildlife sanctuary), 12 MP is limited to a 16:9 aspect ratio, not a deal breaker for me really. Don't have a strap on for the camera, but I'm sure they make them for the Coolpix series :p
Even with a 16:9 ratio, you can always change it in post-production to 4:3 or 3:2, the latter being the traditional standard for cameras. Just remember that some of the photo would be cut by going this approach. In some situations, I've found a wide-screen ratio to be very pleasing to the eye, although it varies depending on the photos.
 

the_randomizer

Well-Known Member
Even with a 16:9 ratio, you can always change it in post-production to 4:3 or 3:2, the latter being the traditional standard for cameras. Just remember that some of the photo would be cut by going this approach. In some situations, I've found a wide-screen ratio to be very pleasing to the eye, although it varies depending on the photos.
In my case, it should be adequate seeing as I do mostly foxes and other canids, so the aspect ratio does look rather nice, getting more used to it, and with an 8 GB SDHC card, I can take quite a large number, not so much with the 16 MP mode (not that I'll really use it lol).

Examples of 16:9



And the 4:3


I like it actually, I think I'm gonna keep using the 16:9 for what I do :D
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
In my case, it should be adequate seeing as I do mostly foxes and other canids, so the aspect ratio does look rather nice, getting more used to it, and with an 8 GB SDHC card, I can take quite a large number, not so much with the 16 MP mode (not that I'll really use it lol).

Examples of 16:9



And the 4:3


I like it actually, I think I'm gonna keep using the 16:9 for what I do :D
Yeah, like I said, it ultimately depends on what you're shooting with. I've used all different sorts of aspect ratios including 1:1, 4:5, 16:9, and custom ratios as well, but I achieved all of those in post-production and not on site.
 

the_randomizer

Well-Known Member
Yeah, like I said, it ultimately depends on what you're shooting with. I've used all different sorts of aspect ratios including 1:1, 4:5, 16:9, and custom ratios as well, but I achieved all of those in post-production and not on site.
Good thing I have Photoshop CS 5 then ;) Makes editing, re-sizing and touching up pictures a lot easier, my brother-in-law worked at Adobe back in 2010 I believe and I got the program for about 80 bucks or so, I can definitely mess with that some more to see what kind of aspect ratios I can get in post production ;)
 

EvilTw1n

Even my henchmen think I'm crazy.
Moderator
^
Seriously, dude. I have a feeling my hair ain't long for the world, and I hope I can rock the bald look like you do.

[Also really wish I could drive that Mini of yours.]
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear

Found this on the Canon Rumors forums, which is full of people who swear by full-frame over APS-C sensors. Quite frankly though, I think this guy is onto something. Well, actually, what he's saying is nothing new honestly. It's all about the skills of the person behind the camera rather than the camera itself. That being said, there are advantages into using Full-frame, such as higher ISOs, better image quality, better bokeh (depending on the lens), but especially with the Fuji X series cameras out now, I feel that gap is shrinking.

I own one of the Fuji X cameras, specifically the X20, and for a 2/3" sensor, the image quality is fantastic. It won't run circles around an APS-C or full-frame sensor, but for its size, it can hold its own. Oh, and dat optical viewfinder is so nice to use.
 

the_randomizer

Well-Known Member
Dang it, sorry I've been inactive lately, anyways, here are some pics of me the other day, hiking with my roommates, it was a short hike but very intensive, my legs became gelatin lol :D






This is in Utah Valley and from the top, you get one helluva an awesome view, especially during the sunset :D
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
The second one is my favorite. Great composition I'm seeing, and I noticed you didn't follow what most people do when shooting horizons, which is have the horizon smack dab in the middle of the photo. You're emphasizing the sky, which for a particular shot like this is what you typically go for, so great job on that. :mthumb:

And as far as the actual hike goes, what doesn't kill you makes you stronger. :msrs:
 

the_randomizer

Well-Known Member
The second one is my favorite. Great composition I'm seeing, and I noticed you didn't follow what most people do when shooting horizons, which is have the horizon smack dab in the middle of the photo. You're emphasizing the sky, which for a particular shot like this is what you typically go for, so great job on that. :mthumb:

And as far as the actual hike goes, what doesn't kill you makes you stronger. :msrs:
Well, I tried to capture it as best I could :D I brought my older camera (from 2006) as it was easier to lug around, but it got the job done! The sunset was too hard for me to pass up :p And silly off topic question, what does R.A.P. mean?
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
Well, I tried to capture it as best I could :D I brought my older camera (from 2006) as it was easier to lug around, but it got the job done! The sunset was too hard for me to pass up :p And silly off topic question, what does R.A.P. mean?
Ridiculously Awesome Post, but considering this IS the Photography Enthusiast thread, I officially declare R.A.P as Ridiculously Awesome Photo(s).
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
http://www.theatlantic.com/features/archive/2014/08/the-war-photo-no-one-would-publish/375762/

Another great article from The Atlantic, and this one features a photo that might be NSFW for some. Not because of sex, but rather its graphic nature of violence. It's interesting how different the world was during Desert Storm, a war where I was barely alive at the time, and would have no clue as to what was really going on in the world.

In today's society, as the article mentions, it's almost unheard of to not see a photo from war or footage that accurately shows what war looks like, but there is that double standard. Too many photos and video of war might desensitize us to the point of not feeling any sort of empathy or emotion of any kind. As the article points out, the charred soldier was clearly fighting for his life, even if he never would've made it, but that shows no matter what side of the war you're on, people fighting for what they believe in is universal. The Nazi's in WWII were fighting for what they believed in (granted, some were forced into war), and so were the Vietnamese during the Vietnam War. And in today's conflicts, we have the same going on.

In many respects, I simply find it interesting how one photo such as this can have that effect on people, and thinking about this further makes me wonder why this photo was not made more public than it was at the time. Even after Vietnam (and during), there was tons of footage of not just of people dying and first hand accounts of what people were doing there, but there was also the war at home with violent protests, and the infamous Sterling Hall Bombing, which happened in my hometown btw.

Part of the reason I shoot photography is more than simply the technical details, as I pointed out in my earlier post to Randomizer's photos. If someone looks at a photo and you have to resort to explaining it, then that photo shouldn't exist. A photograph, whether shot on Film or Digital, should create that instant effect of emotion, or at the very minimum, give people that sense of, "that's a great photo!"

As a hobbyist, I simply have a passion for photography, but I don't want to take photos for the sake of taking them. I want them to mean something and create an emotion for someone, no matter what it is. It could be inspiring, chilling, offensive, or simply cool, I don't care. If I share a photo for people to see, I don't care how they feel. If that split second emotion is there, my work is complete.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear


http://www.reddit.com/r/space/comments/2fcad1/first_ever_picture_taken_from_space_1946/

It's amazing to think that in just two years, that'll mark 70 years since earth was first seen from space, and only 11 short years later would a Soviet Satellite be shot up into space and kick-start the space race, all the way to the moon.

People don't do stuff like that anymore. The technology used during that time was decades ahead of its time because even though we have that capabilities now to settle on the moon and create colonies, we would much rather have the latest and greatest iPhone, or watch the newest episode of reality TV. I know there are people out there who are pushing the limits of technology, but it's such a small number of people to the point where most don't care. We would much rather get on with our Earth lives rather than exploring what's truly out there.

It's saddens me sometimes that we don't explore space and conquer it because that in many respects is what I think mankind was set out to do. Humans are never meant to stay in one place during the whole course of human history, just like we are not meant to stay at our birthhomes our entire lives. We need space, we need to conquer the final frontier.

Don't get me wrong, I love just getting on with my life and doing the things I love, but settling on different moons or planets is only the first step into interstellar space, and eventually exploring what's really out there. I doubt it'll happen in my lifetime, but if it does, color me surprised.

Did I ever mention I love space and the universe?
 

EvilTw1n

Even my henchmen think I'm crazy.
Moderator
It's saddens me sometimes that we don't explore space and conquer it because that in many respects is what I think mankind was set out to do. Humans are never meant to stay in one place during the whole course of human history, just like we are not meant to stay at our birthhomes our entire lives. We need space, we need to conquer the final frontier.
I was watching Cosmos on Netflix a few nights ago, and one of the things Neil deGrasse Tyson mentioned is that a big part of the space race was militarily-driven. There was military value in launching satellites and having rockets that could rain down death from thousands of miles away. It was a unique part of history, with two super powers getting involved in a bit of a prick waving contest of who could outdo the other. So there's that missing component.

But the other problem is space and time itself. We don't have the technology to traverse space in time for us to get far. It took Voyager almost 40 years to reach interstellar space; it's over 4 light years to get to Alpha Centauri (over 24 trillion miles). It would take R&D beyond anything to see what's out there. We probably need to understand dark matter and dark energy before we even start (because the laws of physics as we know them preclude practical human space travel).

That leaves our immediate area, which isn't terribly interesting. Venus is out (even if we could geo engineer away its runaway greenhouse atmosphere, it would still lack a protective magnetic field). Mars is a 150 to 300 day jaunt if fuel is no worry...but it kinda is for us humans. We're probably going to need a new propulsion system unlike anything we've been using.

But I'd still be for going to Mars because it could be a technological stepping stone to going to Io and Europa.



That's important because we need to find some place habitable around here before the sun goes red giant (or its luminescence increases enough to bake us). But even then, we're talking this solar system, and that'll take several generations. Conquering space would take orders of magnitude more. We've hit a physical/physics wall.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
http://www.top-lists-bro.com/articl...clear-Explosions-Ever-Captured-On-Camera.html

Probably some of the most surreal things you could ever capture on camera, and just hope you are never in the vicinity of it. Although, if you see a mushroom cloud with your own eyes, you might be fucked already. And remember, Duck and Cover!

Tsar Bomba is simply mind-blowing from the standpoint of how powerful it actually, but also what it looked like on camera. And to think it was supposed to be 100 megatons (as the article points out). Makes me wonder if a nuclear bomb was so powerful, it would destroy the atmosphere or something.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
A horde of hummingbirds have been making their rounds on my parents' deck this past week, so since I'm visiting, I decided to bring my Canon along to shoot some hummingbirds. :msilly:

There were easily a half-dozen of them flying around, chasing either for food (they have feeders on the deck btw). I sat around for a good twenty minutes shooting, so I'm hoping a few photos turned out alright.

I'll look through the photos when I get home later tonight, and upload those on flickr for all you to see over the next few days. I'll even throw in the past hummingbird photos.

Stay tuned for some hummingbird action, everyone. :mthumb:
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
Just an update for you all, I've sorted through all my hummingbird photos from the other day, and I hope to upload them on flickr by the end of this week. I'm fairly pleased by the results, given how difficult it is to photograph hummingbirds, not just because they are fast, but because they are so small. I'm also planning on uploading all my past hummingbird photos from years past, so stay tuned for that.

I love my Canon 7D + EF 70-300L. :mgrin:
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
Those are some fantastic pictures Shoulder! Desktop background quality lol. Lovin the little captions too haha. Great job man.
Thanks very much, Chris. I still have a lot more photos to upload to Flickr in the coming months as I begin to pick and choose some of my favorites from years past.

My next project is to take all the good photos from my days at EAA over the years, and compile them into one album, while also finding out the names of all the planes in each photo (this is also where snapping photos of the texts and boards next to the planes detailing the name, and its history are quite handy)

Basically, I still have a lot of work to do and research into figuring out what planes are in each photo I've taken. But I figured this hummingbird album would kick-start a lot of this. Glad I got this out last night, so I did not feel my night was completely without progress. :p
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
It's funny, I'm looking through some of my older photos from years past, and about 70% of them are shit. And yet, what I should be doing it preserving the ones which are decent enough, and scrap the rest.

I suppose I remind myself I keep some of the photos I do so I understand how to improve my photos the next time.

Just the photos I took at this year's EAA are mostly shit, with the exception of maybe a select few. I realized when I was trying to do some new things in terms of angles or of just different ways, it didn't pan out as well as I had hoped. But that's just the nature of photography. Sometimes what you shoot isn't going to turn out that well.

As far as the photos I'll be getting up soon, I just discovered I can find out the results of past races from Road America, and using the car #, I can find out exactly what car it is, and who was driving it. This is the same concept I used for when going over my Isle of Man TT photos and figuring out what rider was who, and what motorcycle he/she was attached to.

So perhaps instead of going over my EAA photos, I'll first tackle all my past Road America races from 2008-2010 and go from there.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
http://petapixel.com/2014/12/09/gary-fong-account-ridiculous-300000-lawsuit-threat-nelson-tang/

I have never photographed a Wedding, but have done some Portrait photography for some friends (I did it for free, mind you and to get some experience), and this just made me go wow.

The absolute nerve that attorney had to do what he did puts a lot of fear into not just Wedding Photographers, but any Professional Photographer for that matter. I'm really glad the community and photographers worldwide stood by the Photographer, as well as Gary Fong, whom I've never heard of until today. Sounds to me like a real good guy. Just goes to show there is still good in humanity.

Speaking of which, I have to get back to my photography routine.
 

EvilTw1n

Even my henchmen think I'm crazy.
Moderator
:sigh:

Y'know, I'm actually disappointed that the lawyer-groom wasn't fully disbarred or at least suspended. That's unbelievably unethical behavior.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
So my parents awhile ago set up a series of bird feeders on their deck, which from time to time I've been photographing. I also took pictures of the cat as well, Bowser, so next week I'm hoping to have those all ready to go and show for you all.

Yes, I'm postponing my EAA and Road America stuff for a later date.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
https://medium.com/@vonwong/ordinary-people-hollywood-budgets-224bd7c3b749

This is absolutely AWESOME! Just goes to show you how important lighting is when doing not just photography, but cinematography, and even the lighting in video games if you're going for that particular look.

I should also mention, as the link says, the determination of the subjects themselves into believing in the stuff they're doing. It's actually very inspirational when you think about it.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
So I've been dabbling a bit with more photos I have yet to finalized, and I'd like to get those uploaded by the end of the week, so stay tuned for that!

In other news, I decided to go against all forms of logic, and buy another secondary camera, although this one is the original Canon 5D. I already own the 7D and my Fuji X20 which I both love, so why on earth would I shell out more money for another camera? Simple answer: Full-frame on a budget.

I have this beautiful Helios 44-2 58mm F2 lens that while great on a crop, I feel would be better suited on a full-frame. Between the lack of features of the 5D, and the fully manual operation of the Helios lens, I could have some fun with this. Stay tuned for more!
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
So after a couple of days testing out my Canon 5D (original 5D, not MKII, or MKIII), I have to say this could become a good camera, along with this fantastic Helios lens.

The Canon 5D certainly doesn't have a lot of features when compared to my 7D, and yet the lack of features will likely force my hand into being more creative in compiling shots. And couple this with the Helios lens, a fully manual lens, I can have some fun with this.

But I'll continue to use it over the coming weeks, and just maybe I'll make a video giving my overall impressions of it, and answering if a 5D is still worth it as a budget full-frame camera.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
http://petapixel.com/2015/01/22/dis...titioning-canon-make-dslr-left-handed-people/

As a left-handed individual myself, even I've wondered why there haven't been any SLRs, or any camera for that matter designed for left-handers, or hell just one that is ambidextrous.

I was particularly surprised at Canon's response, although in retrospect, it is not all THAT surprising. Modern cameras, specifically SLRs have always been designed for right-handed people, but the body itself without a grip could be designed for either hand.

With touch-screens making headway on DSLRs, and mirrorless cameras, it is probably easier than ever to provide more prosumer-based cameras with options for left and right handed people.

For video games, it is possible for quite a few games to adjust the controls to be made more for a left-handed individual. I merely adapted to the conventional control methods because back in the day of playing games with my brothers, I had no choice in the matter, same with cameras.

One thing I have realized over the years, is not only are cameras designed for right-handed people, but the right eye as well. I am not only left-hand dominant, but left-eye dominant in terms of the eye I frequently use (And yet I'm right leg dominant. Go figure). Interestingly enough though, my left eye is slightly differently compared to my right (when using contacts. the axis of my right eye is 100, versus 70 for my left).
 

Cubits

Well-Known Member
How have I not noticed this thread in ever?! I used to rock my dad's hand-me-down Nikon back in the day, with a brace of lenses and a phat Kodak strap.

While I was at uni studying industrial design I did a few photography courses, and got to play with the new fangled digital cameras (2k a pop for acceptable quality back then!). Let it be known that as a student I was sticking with film!

Once dslr was established and affordable I had drifted away from photography. It's sad really, I massively enjoyed it, particularly playing with depth (in product photography you learn to nail dof, and with film there is no preview!).

Nowadays I knock about with my phone. They've come a long way, but you're hugely restricted by how close you HAVE to be to your subject. Still, restrictions can spur creativity, and it's not insurmountable.
 

Cubits

Well-Known Member
When we went to Europe all I had was my 4mp htc one.

Here's a sunset touching the Colosseum:



Here's the storm which followed:



The bell tower at the Duomo in Florence:



And Kimberley walking away from a waterfall in Nice:



Had to throw that in, 95% of our photos were architectural! Romantic holiday much?
 

Cubits

Well-Known Member
A trick my dad taught me as a kid was to shoot through the lens of polarised sunglasses. Different orientations and "tilts" would produce interesting effects. It's super easy to do with phones! I always have a look at the filtering when I've got my glasses on hand.

This shows the filter effect (not cropped):



Aaaand I'll upload a tilted shot in a bit (could've sworn I had a couple up...).
 
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Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
A trick my dad taught me as a kid was to shoot through the lens of polarised sunglasses. Different orientations and "tilts" would produce interesting effects. It's super easy to do with phones! I always have a look at the filtering when I've got my glasses on hand.

This shows the filter effect (not cropped):



Aaaand I'll upload a tilted shot in a bit (could've sworn I had a couple up...).

Honestly, I have not heard of that trick, but it is a good one now that I think about it. I love using polarized filters on my lenses, but depending on the brand, they can be a bit expensive. For my 70-300m L I use only the best filters as to not affect image quality that much. But even so, a lot of photo editing programs have these presets built-in, so it's easier than ever to get the look you want.

In most cases, a lens hood should suffice for not only lens flaring, but it doubles as a protective cover for your glass. I would say if you're going to be outside where dust, sand, etc are very prominent, a UV filter should be minimum, but if you're going to be inside a lot of the time, lens hood is all you need.

My 70-300 though I use filters all the time since I normally only use it for sports/action, bird, and wildlife photography, but it can double as a very nice portrait lens.

Speaking of filters, you can also fake a graduated neutral density filter by using a black piece of construction paper. Simply cut a square of it, put it up to the lens about halfway covering it (horizontal normally), then when you have a more long exposure such as landscapes with a horizon, put the paper where the high contrast area of the frame it, and move it out of the way mid-way between the exposure. I haven't done this myself, but the effect can work pretty well if done right, and you don't have a ND filter.

How have I not noticed this thread in ever?! I used to rock my dad's hand-me-down Nikon back in the day, with a brace of lenses and a phat Kodak strap.

While I was at uni studying industrial design I did a few photography courses, and got to play with the new fangled digital cameras (2k a pop for acceptable quality back then!). Let it be known that as a student I was sticking with film!

Once dslr was established and affordable I had drifted away from photography. It's sad really, I massively enjoyed it, particularly playing with depth (in product photography you learn to nail dof, and with film there is no preview!).

Nowadays I knock about with my phone. They've come a long way, but you're hugely restricted by how close you HAVE to be to your subject. Still, restrictions can spur creativity, and it's not insurmountable.
Yeah, this thread's been around for awhile, and even though I usually am the one to post on it, it's of course open to everyone. And I get what you mean about being restricted, forcing you to be creative. Just using this manual focus lens on my 5D is very interesting. I'll be doing some more shooting in the coming weeks, and just maybe make a video of my thoughts with both of these tools at my disposal.
 
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