Photography Enthusiast

Cubits

Well-Known Member
Oh for sure it's better to use real filters, and software can do so much these days! We were playing with glasses because they were something you had on you, and when you were just running around with a 50mm portrait lens on a film camera it was all the editing you could do! We did also use the paper trick!

I just find that when a phone is all you have, it will work in place of a filter nicely. A neat trick from the dark ages which is still relevant in this "instagram filter" world.

Speaking of, my first camera was the equivalent of a happy meal trinket. It was 35mm with a fixed 50mm lens (possibly smaller), but had all of the settings. It did leak light like a seive though, so every picture had a golden vignette. Was garbage then, but is fondly retro these days... I loved it to bits (literally).
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
Oh for sure it's better to use real filters, and software can do so much these days! We were playing with glasses because they were something you had on you, and when you were just running around with a 50mm portrait lens on a film camera it was all the editing you could do! We did also use the paper trick!

I just find that when a phone is all you have, it will work in place of a filter nicely. A neat trick from the dark ages which is still relevant in this "instagram filter" world.

Speaking of, my first camera was the equivalent of a happy meal trinket. It was 35mm with a fixed 50mm lens (possibly smaller), but had all of the settings. It did leak light like a seive though, so every picture had a golden vignette. Was garbage then, but is fondly retro these days... I loved it to bits (literally).
I'm trying to recall my first camera period, and I think it was an old kodak film camera, which was a hand-me-down. I did not really get into photography really until my first DSLR (my first digital camera was a Fujifilm, followed by a Canon Powershot), which was the Canon EOS Rebel aka 300D in your region. Loved that camera. It was bare bones, had no creature comforts of most newer cameras today, and yet it would still take great photos. I sold that to a friend of mine who only had a simple point-and-shoot.

I then upgraded a couple years later to the Rebel XSi, or 450D (I would again sell this to my friend who bought the 300D), and that became my workhorse camera until last year (shot over 20k photos with it). All the photos I took while I was at the Isle of Man TT in 2013 were from using that camera. Couple that with an L lens, you would never know it was an entry-level body. It's amazing what you can ink out of entry-level cameras these days (a lot has to do with the tool behind the camera, of course).

I acquired the 7D from my brother who was shifting his gear from Canon to Sony (he wants the Sony A7 II), and sold his Helio 44-2 lens on top of the 7D. Sort of a bundle package, an got the family discount as it were. The 7D will be my primary camera for many years, and it has more than enough features for what I do. For crop cameras, it's still one of the best out there despite being over 5 years old.
 

EvilTw1n

Even my henchmen think I'm crazy.
Moderator
I feel like such a scrub reading through this thread. I'm like "oh, I'm happy that I have a Galaxy S4 with a better camera than my old phone," and you guys are talking so far beyond my depth that I can't even.

Completely jealous on that vacation, too, @Cubits. First @repomech goes to Japan, and then you tour Europe. The envy, it's real.
 

Cubits

Well-Known Member
Here's a couple of examples of tilting for effect. Now, if you were actually careful with it you can use it to colourise certain parts of your shot, put a gradient on it, have variable glare, or throw a lens flare. I was just messing around that day, but i ended up using a couple of my straight-up filtered shots (particularly overlooking the water without blowing out).

No glasses, the left side is lit up too much:



A tilt to calm the left side without applying to the right, causing a "vintage" yellow to blue gradient.



Catching a bit of sun inside the glasses and pushing an even blue tone across it.



So while you can "instagramify", with a bit of care you can actually capture more detail with a polarised filter, and you can aim it by freely handling the filter.
 

Cubits

Well-Known Member
Oh god, i just remembered the most "avant garde" trick we used to use! Free lensing!

You detach the lens from the camera and tilt that to alter the image. We used to do all sorts of awesome stuff that way, like crazy macro shots by reversing the lens, bokeh by tilting to "ruin" the focus, intentional light bleeds (i think that's where i got the idea... from that first crappy camera i had).

Not sure how easy that is to do with dslr's, but if you're already in full manual it shouldn't be a problem, right? You can imagine how much of a pain it was back in the film days to know if what you were doing was working!

Edit: Ah, here you go if you want to see some examples!

http://gizmodo.com/5679403/101-photos-taken-with-the-lens-detached
 
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Cubits

Well-Known Member
@EvilTw1n There's no pressure with this stuff, just take loads and loads of shots and experiment all the time! Shoot through the bottom of a glass, hang lights, whatever goes! Just get the basics down and it's all art from there.

Some of the best shots are accidents, and with digital you can really afford to go nuts! In four weeks in Europe I took nearly 1000 shots, and now that's whittled down to just 60!

This is Kimberley walking through a shot by accident. The intended composition didn't work, but I love the implication of this, this "leaving" energy:



I'm sure she was sick of me stopping every few minutes!
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
@EvilTw1n There's no pressure with this stuff, just take loads and loads of shots and experiment all the time! Shoot through the bottom of a glass, hang lights, whatever goes! Just get the basics down and it's all art from there.

Some of the best shots are accidents, and with digital you can really afford to go nuts! In four weeks in Europe I took nearly 1000 shots, and now that's whittled down to just 60!

This is Kimberley walking through a shot by accident. The intended composition didn't work, but I love the implication of this, this "leaving" energy:



I'm sure she was sick of me stopping every few minutes!
It's interesting when I still hear from the purists to preserve every shot, or make it count. I'm sorry, but this is not the film days anymore. That memory card will unlikely ever go bad, and if does it will happen not for decades. Shoot, shoot, and shoot away.

During my Isle of Man trip, I took over 4000 photos, but managed to cut it down to less than 500 when was all said and done. I probably would've cut it down even more, but I was also identifying all the riders in every frame, on top of editing/cropping, and give each photo a specific name. Lots of extra work, yes, but I felt the end result was worth it. Must better than just uploading the photos straight to Flickr from the camera like 90% of people do.

I also shoot 99% in RAW, so I almost always make small adjustments as needed. I don't do photoshop though (use Aperture), so I'm already limited to what I can do, and yet I feel it forces myself to get the shot right the first time, rather than doing all these touch-ups.

Adjusting exposure or saturation, cropping, adding some other colors, a touch of sharpening, contrasts, etc is mostly what I do.
 

Cubits

Well-Known Member
Every shot should be "considered", should be structured. I don't think you'd advance by being haphazard, but we're so much more free to take risks and get instant feedback from that. No more trying an idea and waiting several hours to see what happened. So we should be taking way more photos!
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
http://danbaileyphoto.com/blog/the-end-of-an-era-i-just-sold-all-of-my-dslr-gear/

I've heard of this guy from time to time, and it was interesting reading how he made such a drastic transition. It also puts into the mind of where I think Photography as a tool and an art will become in 10-20 years. While I am very happy with my Canon 5D original, and 7D, and my assortment of glass, I also find a lot of enjoyment using my little Fujifilm X20, which will do 80% of the photos I would normally take, but in a much smaller form factor.

There are still other factors at play which a small sensor just cannot replicate, such as the shallow depth of field, unless you are seriously close, or even the improved low-light capabilities, but smaller sensors have been making strides in recent years for both those things.

There's also the notion of the standard 35mm sensor size, which many pros still swear by. But by reading up a lot on the X series cameras from Fujifilm, that gap is shrinking more and more every year. From the original X100, to the now X-T1, it's incredible what these cameras can accomplish with cropped sensors. But it's not only the sensors though, either. There are the features, the feel of them, and how Fuji has been updating their cameras to include more features to keep them alive. While my X20 is outdated compared to the current X30, I have no plans to sell it, unlike what I did for the X10, which I owned briefly for a time. The X20 fixed most of the issues I had with the X10, chief among which was the optical viewfinder, and other things as well.

If Fujifilm, with their X series cameras has not become a force to be reckoned with yet, it'll happen over the next few years. Both Nikon and Canon will have some competition on their hands if more professional photographers like Dan Bailey opt for X series cameras and glass. Every year, I hear more and more good news about Fuji's X cameras.

Ultimately though, they are all just tools, but some damn fine tools they are.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
http://foxtrotalpha.jalopnik.com/20-stunning-military-images-that-you-absolutely-have-to-1721188630

Simply stunning. If only I had stayed for the Air Show at EAA this year, I would've shot some similar results, probably.

My half day at EAA this year didn't turn out so well photowise. Next year, my plan is stay a couple of days and take the time to shoot stuff. This year was a fluke because of moving and whatnot, and I had other engagements later that evening. Still though, got to see the F-35, and F-22 side by side, so that was cool.

Oh and my photos from EAA this year didn't out the greatest. I'll likely scrap all of them.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
Not my Joke, but I got a good chuckle:

Photographers are so violent. They frame you, shoot you, blow you up, and then hang you on their wall. Needless to say, it makes me shutter...
 

Cubits

Well-Known Member
I was in Fiji in November, and took along my gopro, my shiny new sony xperia z5 compact, and 128gb of microSD capacity.

The Sony can be a bit finicky, but does turn out some very nice photos!





And the GoPro is good after you crop the worst of the fisheye out of it:





Reminds me of a Metroid.
 
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