Post Your Favorite Pre-2000s Albums/Songs

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
#1
Like the title says, post your favorite albums and songs that came out before the year 2000. The 90s, 80s, 70s, 60s, and earlier decades were a great time for music each in their own way. If you want to recommend something not so well-known to others here, even better.
 

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
#2
I'll start with some of the stuff I've found about the 90s that has become sort of permanent in my big playlist:



 
#3
Edit: Accidentally posted the Dig Me Out single instead of the album. Fixed.

In no particular order...
The Asch Recordings by Woody Guthrie
I mean the entirety of 69 Love Songs, not just volume 1.
Pottymouth by Bikini Kill
If You're Feeling Sinister by Belle and Sebastion
Winter in America by Gill Scott Heron
Surfer Rosa and Come On Pilgrim by The Pixies
Equinox by Styx

Oooh, looks like both me and @juegosmajicos love ourselves some DJ Shadow.


Sorry if this seems like a lot, this isn't half as big as I initially had it, actually. I tried to trim it down. But at least you can get the full scope of my horrible, horrible taste.
 
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#4

Can't ever get enough of that song.

Also, Tsunami Bomb's Mayhem on the Seas EP is fantastic.

Those are two first things that popped into my head. I just woke up here.
 

EvilTw1n

Even my henchmen think I'm crazy.
Moderator
#5
Alright, I'm gonna go way back.

OK, so you can pretty much trace American music to field hollers, blues, and jazz, and you can do the wiki work yourself to figure most of it out. But one of THE convergent moments of American music is this:


A lot of jazz at the time was more organized polyphony; yes, you had King Oliver and Sidney Bechet out there, but it took Armstrong to redefine jazz as a soloists art (that stuttering-yet-fluid, meandering-yet-melodious intro is improv 101; bop turned up the number of notes, but very little done in the time since "West End Blues" is more harmonically advanced. It's musical Genesis. Oh, and you also have Armstrong adding vocals there. That was still a novelty at the time. After Louis Armstrong, people sang, period. He changed the course of music, and is probably the single most important musician of the 20th century.

One can argue that guitar was the driving force of late 20th century music. And sorry Americans, but you don't get to the guitar's preeminence without a guy named Django Reinhardt.


Yes, you had Lonnie Johnson and Eddie Lang before Django, but no one would have said that they were soloists on par with Armstrong or Bechet. Django was. When Lang released a record like "Pristine" with solo guitar, it was considered a novelty, because the guitar was still considered a rhythm instrument. Django changed that. In his hands, the guitar became a soloists' instrument. He was doing this as early on record as 1934, predating Charlie Christian by half a decade, and he was doing it in Paris, which was the hot spot of the world at the time. Oh, and he also did it with only two fingers on his fretting hand able to play melody (due to severe burns). We Americans want to give all the credit to our own, because jazz is American. But Django was the guy who changed the trajectory for the guitar. He's the guy who got name-checked from everyone from B.B. King to Jeff Beck to Willie Nelson. His most famous tune is "Nuages," written during WWII. It is the only "jazz standard" written by a European. He recorded it several times, first as a swing tune, as a more 40's big band version, as a more adventurous bop tune, and finally as a cool jazz version on a newly electrified guitar.

 
#6
My favourite stuff is from the mid 2000s personally, but I do like some Radiohead, Muse debuted in 1999 I believe and I like Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band and Ziggy Stardust, ITAOTS is nice too which someone posted already.

Can't ever get enough of that song.
2001 bro. However Damon Albarn of Gorrilaz did great stuff with Blur before the 2000s with songs like Parklife, Song 2, She's So High, Boys & Girls, Universal and more!
 
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Wolven

The Wolf of TNE Street
#10
Illmatic - Nas
All Eyez on Me - Tupac
Legend - Bob Marley

And I know I am kind of cheating but:
Marshal Mathers LP - Eminem. It came out in 2000 but still, probably Eminem's best aside from the Eminem Show. But that came out in 2002.
 

Wolven

The Wolf of TNE Street
#11

Can't ever get enough of that song.

Also, Tsunami Bomb's Mayhem on the Seas EP is fantastic.

Those are two first things that popped into my head. I just woke up here.
Freaking love that song, was going to post Gorillaz too but google told me the first album came out in 2001. Gorillaz is one of my favorite bands, love the crap out of them. Can't wait for their next album next year...
 
#12
Look at all this white boy music. Makes me sick looking at it, almost choked on all that beard hair. "I LOVE YOU JESUS CUHRIIIIIIAYAYIST!" really? Christian rock too?
Lets turn this sumbitch sideways. Where you at Ja Rule baby?!
huh, none of his beats came out pre-2000?
Man I'm too young for this shit. I'll be back later.
 

EvilTw1n

Even my henchmen think I'm crazy.
Moderator
#14
Aww, thanks, COV. :mhug:

For the olds.
So picking up off of Django, he had really tried to incorporate bop into his playing late in his career. There was a huge jazz schism between swing and bop, based a lot on this tune:


"Salt Peanuts" pretty much changed how everyone played in jazz. Dizzy and Charlie Parker moved the goal posts. If the soloing there sounds modern to you for jazz playing, it's because it is. Hard bop got even faster and more dissonant, but didn't change things up the way bop originally did. What's interesting is that you can hear the lineage of how everyone came around to bop in the early 1940s by listening to a range of other jazz records before then - riffing and getting heavier over time. Hell, here's Django and Grappelli from around 1939. You put distortion on the guitar and add a drummer, and the intro would work as a riff in a metal tune.


Anyways, jazz was a cauldron at this time. It had gone from dixieland/ragtime, to New Orleans polyphony, to Armstrong's soloist redefinition, to swing, to Duke Ellington's orchestra and then Count Basie's improved head charts, to bebop. The reaction against bop was cool jazz. Fewer notes, more structure. Everyone points to Miles Davis and "Kind of Blue," but I've always had a soft spot for "Sketches of Spain" because it's just so different.


Jazz could also be this. It could be improv, but it could also be Miles deciding to do "Concierto de Aranjuez" and stretching it even further. It's not really quite jazz...but nor is it classical. It's a muddy middle point. If you've never listened to "Sketches of Spain," do it. It's an experience. You need to be alone with a good drink in a dark room. It will make you feel something.

From there, jazz went nuts. Free Jazz and Ornette Coleman was the logical response to cool jazz; free jazz had very, very, very little structure. Tempo and chord changes became relative. Even to trained ears, it can sound like noise. But it expanded what a soloist could do in jazz, and when reined in just a little bit (with at least a semblance of structure)? You get Trane.


But by this point in the mid-1960s, jazz had become too esoteric, as it pretty well deconstructed itself as a soloists' art - while rock 'n roll with vocals took its place. But in a few decades, jazz had stuffed in so much music, so much vibrancy, that it elevated the form to high art. You could spend years of your life dedicated to listening to jazz, and you may not get any further than listening to Armstrong and Bix. There's just so much of it. Write it off as "old people's music" at your own peril. You're missing out.
 

Odo

Well-Known Member
#15
Aww, thanks, COV. :mhug:

For the olds.
So picking up off of Django, he had really tried to incorporate bop into his playing late in his career. There was a huge jazz schism between swing and bop, based a lot on this tune:


"Salt Peanuts" pretty much changed how everyone played in jazz. Dizzy and Charlie Parker moved the goal posts. If the soloing there sounds modern to you for jazz playing, it's because it is. Hard bop got even faster and more dissonant, but didn't change things up the way bop originally did. What's interesting is that you can hear the lineage of how everyone came around to bop in the early 1940s by listening to a range of other jazz records before then - riffing and getting heavier over time. Hell, here's Django and Grappelli from around 1939. You put distortion on the guitar and add a drummer, and the intro would work as a riff in a metal tune.


Anyways, jazz was a cauldron at this time. It had gone from dixieland/ragtime, to New Orleans polyphony, to Armstrong's soloist redefinition, to swing, to Duke Ellington's orchestra and then Count Basie's improved head charts, to bebop. The reaction against bop was cool jazz. Fewer notes, more structure. Everyone points to Miles Davis and "Kind of Blue," but I've always had a soft spot for "Sketches of Spain" because it's just so different.


Jazz could also be this. It could be improv, but it could also be Miles deciding to do "Concierto de Aranjuez" and stretching it even further. It's not really quite jazz...but nor is it classical. It's a muddy middle point. If you've never listened to "Sketches of Spain," do it. It's an experience. You need to be alone with a good drink in a dark room. It will make you feel something.

From there, jazz went nuts. Free Jazz and Ornette Coleman was the logical response to cool jazz; free jazz had very, very, very little structure. Tempo and chord changes became relative. Even to trained ears, it can sound like noise. But it expanded what a soloist could do in jazz, and when reined in just a little bit (with at least a semblance of structure)? You get Trane.


But by this point in the mid-1960s, jazz had become too esoteric, as it pretty well deconstructed itself as a soloists' art - while rock 'n roll with vocals took its place. But in a few decades, jazz had stuffed in so much music, so much vibrancy, that it elevated the form to high art. You could spend years of your life dedicated to listening to jazz, and you may not get any further than listening to Armstrong and Bix. There's just so much of it. Write it off as "old people's music" at your own peril. You're missing out.
Jazz is brilliant. I'd love to understand it more, but it's like too overwhelming for me.
 
#17
The beginning of everything:



If by that you mean rock and roll, then... nope.
No disrespect to the man as a performer, but Elvia largely got big on covers songs by black artists, making then "acceptable" for mainstream radio. To say Elvis was really "the beginning" would be doing a big disservice to those artists. For Pete's sake, Chuck Berry was his idol... and provides a great example.

 
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Odo

Well-Known Member
#18
If by that you mean rock and roll, then... nope.
No disrespect to the man as a performer, but Elvia largely got big on covers songs by black artists, making then "acceptable" for mainstream radio. To say Elvis was really "the beginning" would be doing a big disservice to those artists. For Pete's sake, Chuck Berry was his idol... and provides a great example.


Yeah yeah, I hear that a lot, he's not the original composer, bla bla bla

I disagree. Rock was all about performance and almost 100 percent of the popular artists in that age were singers who sing songs composed by others. It was a standard.

Elvis was the real rocker who performed much better than those composers and he created the posture, the market, the environment for everything rock related. Elvis had the attitude the formed the rock movement in a way that in many cities he was banned because of his attitude.

All the brilliant hard rock artists who started their careers based on Elvis work agree.
 
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EvilTw1n

Even my henchmen think I'm crazy.
Moderator
#20
I disagree. Rock was all about performance and almost 100 percent of the popular artists in that age were singers who sing songs composed by others.
Playing covers is as old as music, sure. But I don't think it's too hard to see that there's a reason Elvis and Buddy Holly became more famous than Little Richard and Fats Domino, and it didn't have to do with talent alone (it's the same reason Eric Clapton is a more renowned blues player in America than Freddie King is, and that virtually no one knows the name Goree Carter). That doesn't take anything away from Elvis's talent, though; it was just the time and culture of the day, and it was easy to get over a dude like Elvis. I mean, Christ, look at him.



...where'd my pants go?

However, the point of dispute would be marking Elvis the beginning of everything; rock 'n roll was a conglomerate of western swing jazz, jump blues, and electric blues. It has many parents. Elvis was an important one, though.

But getting back to jazz for a moment, I say just pick something you like and dig in. For years, I wanted to get into jazz, but it seemed far too daunting. Even old Armstrong stuff with the Hot Five or the Hot Seven (early hot jazz) was really remote to me because of all the brass competing with each other. Then I heard Django do this.


...and I was done. Jazz on strings, with one soloist and an easy-to-follow rhythm? Yeah, that I could follow. I think it's a pretty easy gateway drug for jazz because of the sparse polyphony. You'll find a lot of this music under the name of "gypsy jazz," a label slowly being phased out (it's just that no one knows what to replace it with - Django was a Roma, but Oscar Aleman wasn't, so it's not Romani Jazz, and nor is it Manouche or Gitan Jazz).
 
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#21
For another origin story about the "FriedShoes" name. In the second verse, Raekwon lets loose the line "too fly jewels are shaking". It doesnt sound like that at all in the song. It sounds like "true fried shoes". I'm apparently the only person who hears it that way though, so it stuck with me until I was able to use it in online handles and such. But thats only part of the story, and the rest is for another time.
 

Aki

Well-Known Member
#22

Eminem influenced a good amount of my youth and pretty much brought me into the rap game as a second grader. My parents didn't really give a shit about what time of music I listened to, what games I played, or what movies I watched. They were so chill, thank god for that. The first time I ever saw the music video for The Real Slim Shady was with my dad when we were in Norway visiting his sister. Both of us thought that it was hilarious. Since that day, I've been a huge Eminem fan. I'm also the first of my generation. I was one of the original kids that brought rap to the suburbs and none of my friends admit it, but I influenced them more than anyone else and it was all thanks to this. Em is still killing it, but I'm a Wayne fan now.

As for the Chili P's, that music video is dope. It came out during the height of the original PlayStation and I always found it really cool that the video was pretty much them in a GTA type of game. I still fuck with the Chili P's. They're one of a few bands that I listen to that are outside of my preferred rap genre.
 
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Odo

Well-Known Member
#23
My thing is more rock, hard rock, metal.

First I put the first Elvis album that is for me one of the best albums of all time.

Other band that rocks is Queen. Yes, it's quite standard and they've got a lot of rubbish club songs, but, before that they did this:





and this:




Those are true art rock in the best form.

And Queen has much more.

What Queen could do without a single synthesiser is amazing. Those 4 guys were genius.
 

Wolven

The Wolf of TNE Street
#24
Also, anything Frank Sinatra.
This song was something else though.
The spanish version by Il Divo is also pretty dang amazing
 

Wolven

The Wolf of TNE Street
#25
Also, now that I have begun listening to it, Homework by Daft Punk. It wasn't easily digestible at first, but on the second listen it is pretty dang good
 

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
#26
I prefer Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots, but The Soft Bulletin came out in 1999 so it qualifies for this thread.


The Flaming Lips are bar none the best live show I've seen in my 5 years of going to music festivals.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
#27
There are loads of albums from the 50s, 60s, and 70s that I could name, but for now, I am going to go with something more personal as I used to listen to this all the time when I was a kid.Not my favorite album, but definitely one that immediately comes to mind from my childhood:

 

EvilTw1n

Even my henchmen think I'm crazy.
Moderator
#28
Not exactly an album, but I stumbled upon this on youtube, and it's been 25 years since SRV died, and this concert is 30 years old, so...

 

GaemzDood

Well-Known Member
#29
Uncompromising War on Art Under the Dictatorship of the Proletariat by Killdozer, anything by Elliot Smith, Mellow Gold (especially Mutherfucker), & Green Mind and Where You Been by Dinosaur Jr. among other things. More to come soon.

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
 

Goodtwin

Well-Known Member
#30
For the 90's, I would say Tupac was my favorite artist. His body of work is unmatched in my opinion. Hundreds of great tracks. His music was emotional, so it may seem to contradict itself at times, but it's only because it reflects how he felt at various times in his life.

Sent from my SM-G360V using Tapatalk
 

repomech

resident remnant robot relic
#31
Spoiler tags people. Otherwise the thread becomes unusuable.

@mattavelle1
@juegosmajicos
@FriedShoes

I'm going to humbly suggest simply deleting any posts that don't use spoiler tags to embed their videos. Otherwise we may as well write-off this thread like what happened to the other music threads.

While I enjoy the whole album, this song always sticks out


@EvilTw1n showed it too me and I always think of him <3
You little ingrate, pretty sure that was me :p, back when @Alaska_Gamer was in the chat (turned out he's Gordon Gano's nephew so I was dropping a lot of Violent Femmes). Either way great tune, great band. A friend put me onto them when I was 13 and they formed an integral part of the soundtrack to my teen years.

And then this happened...



If you stopped watching before Wendy drove the armored school bus into the wall of televisions - you fucked up.

Speaking of which...




Screw it, we're going full Violent Femmes binge...



 

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
#33
Yes unfortunately spoiler tags don't actually help. Even if you have to click the spoiler tag to see what video was posted, the video has already been embedded and pre-loaded by your browser.

I could look for a way to force these music threads to only load up 10 posts at a time instead of 50, though.
 

EthanGK

The blunder from down under
#36
I love a lot of pre-2000s music (not because I think it's better, but because there's a lot more of it than post-2000 music duh ;)) so it was hard to choose one favourite album from then but after some thought I chose Abbey Road by The Beatles. It doesn't have many of my favourite songs to listen to, hell it doesn't even have my favourite songs by The Beatles but the idea was to choose an album, not individual songs.

While a bunch of the individual tracks are great (Something is a gorgeous love song, Octopus's Garden is deligtfully playful, I Want You is a great earworm and the forefather of Doom Rock, Come Together and Here Comes the Sun speak for themselves) the total is definitely greater than the sum of the individual components.
This record is so amazing to listen to in order. It starts off sounding like a Beatles album (bar Let it Be), well-produced, well-composed, musically interesting but it sort of ramps up for the first half. Then eventually it reaches a peak of intensity with I Want You, a long track filled with desperation and loneliness which abruptly cuts off at the end of the first side. Flip the record over and the bleakness is sliced by Here Comes the Sun, followed again by the gorgeous harmony-rich song "Because". What follows this is easily one of my favourite sequences of songs ever put to press.
Every song flows in and out of one another, it's like reading a book and what seemed like a light part of the plot was really foreshadowing.
It's such an awesome album, I won't say any more but anyone who hasn't listened to it really should give it the time.
While I prefer the songs on Sgt. Pepper and the White Album, this album listened to as a whole is really something special.
 
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