To Be Infinite - 2018 Games Completion Thread

Karkashan

Married to Chrom

Started and finished Metroid Fusion (Wii U) today, this time going for 100% item completion.

If it wasn't blindingly obvious by my clear time I used a step by step guide that placed emphasis on overall speed, which even though I wasn't trying to play through the game super fast, it made things a lot easier.

I did die a couple times, so retreading lost ground probably helped my time as well.

That was also the easiest, most cooperative SA-X I've ever seen in a runthrough of this game.

But for my thoughts on Fusion? Yep, still love this game. Heck, the shinespark stuff wasn't really even that bad (at least, not as bad as I remember). (However, that one Power Bomb expansion surrounded by crumbling blocks that I had to shut down the game after thirty minutes of not being able to get it, only to grab it first try when I reloaded a previous save? Yeah, that one can go to hell)

Having gotten every power up in this game, I gotta say I really do appreciate how the devs weren't afraid to use hidden passages that not even powerbombs could reveal. It really brings this level of "ooh, yay I found this neat hidden thing, now I'm super prepared for the next boss fight!"
 

EvilTw1n

Even my henchmen think I'm crazy.
Moderator
Metroid Fusion (GBA) [Wii U VC]

I used to know this game pretty well. I used to not even notice the difficulty spike in the back half of the game, but I did this time. Going in cold after probably 4 years or so? 3:41 and 48% collection. Felt longer than that, because I definitely died a couple of times (once each on a couple of bosses, until I remembered their patterns). Part of that was this being the first time I played the game with a legit d-pad. The one on my old GBA SP was always a little rope-y. But playing it on the Wii U GamePad? Slightest pressure up means you're angling your shot up. I finally trained myself to make sure I was pressing only left or right, perfected the SA-X, aaaaand died to the Omega Metroid because I kept stepping on its foot from pressing right too hard.

At first, I wasn't really feeling this one like I used to. Going from Hollow Knight to Super to Fusion...well, you definitely feel the hard linear streak. The half-run movement speed and the nerfed wall jump kinda bothered me. And the simple, bold tile work that looked great on my SP's 3-inch screen looked quite plain on my 40" TV.

But then I went with it and accepted the guiding hand*. Once you get to the sector with the electrified water, Fusion begins to really settle in. You could tell this was a game they went out of the way to change the formula up on - Retro was already doing an homage to Super's progression structure, so this game had to offer something else. And y'know what? Taking Metroid gameplay and making it more direct is still pretty good.

I still dig you, Fusion.

[*Man, people must've forgotten what a dick Adam was in this game. "Go there. Now." Feign your gasping sounds, as Samus took orders from an asshole of a computer.]
 
I haven't been playing Fusion. I got to Sector 2 and stopped, didn't think of it much afterwards. I don't like forcing myself through games for the sake of it so maybe I'll go back to it. Was busy reading and playing Resident Evil: Code Veronica X. Speaking of which,

Resident Evil: Code Veronica X (PS4)

I really liked it a lot. Some enemies were annoying, mostly Bandersnatches with their long ass reach. The game was kind enough to let me know I dead 29 times throughout the game, and playing it I often thought how hard it can be. However, when the game was done I had 200+ hand gun bullets, 100% ammo for the sub machine guns, 100+ bow gun darts, dozens of explosives (flame grenades, grenades, acid grenades, explosive bow gun darts) and quite a bit of healing items. So I felt like a dumb ass for saving so much and dying often. If I replay this game I'll go a but more crazy on the good items. I always feel like I need to save stuff for later, then the game ends. Oh well.

Good stuff all around though. 1 and 4 are still my top picks but CV is damn good as well. I think I'll play 2 in October (that'll be my horror game of the month) but who knows. I don't really know what to play now. My backlog is now very tiny, but I don't know if I'm in the mood for them right now.
 

Karkashan

Married to Chrom
COV and I finished up our completely co op run of Resident Evil 5 + Lost in Nightmares + Desperate Escape (PS4). The game truly shines when playing co op, I gotta say.

QTE's suck, though at least we know that it'll take five minutes to reach the optimum altitude for COMPLETE. GLOBAL. SATURATION.

I had never done the Lost in Nightmares or Desperate Escape DLCs before, so that was a new experience for me. Desperate Escape, was basically what I imagine if you could do the Island from RE4 in co op.

Lost in Nightmares, nailed the atmosphere of a creepy mansion down pat, even if I wanted it to be longer it was still fairly solid throughout. I'm sure @CitizenOfVerona has his own two cents he'd like to add.

praisegrima
 
Tomb Raider (PC)

This is the very first one. Shadow releases next month so I figured I'd go back and replay the first one again. Took me a lot less time this playthrough, probably because I played the other CORE series as well so I know what I'm doing.

I just love it, but I shouldn't this much. Its easy to fall into traps or get mobbed to death, controls take some getting use to and whatnot, but I just love it all. I love the length of these levels and how it focuses on exploration while combat takes a far back seat. I enjoyed the levels and how the game just lets you go at it. Lara's Mansion is one of the most nostalgic levels for me. I use to play this game as a kid a lot but never managed to actually get anywhere so my childhood memories of this game are Lara's Mansion and the first level.

While I do really enjoy TR 2013 and Rise, I admit they're a different kind of enjoyment. When I replayed 2013 this year I was shocked at remembering just how little puzzle solving there is. Even the optional tombs were essentially a singular puzzle in one room. Rise did a better job so I'm hoping Shadow takes it up another notch. Still, they're very fun action/adventure games and at the end of the day, fun is fun even if it's pretty removed from what made the series famous in the first place.

Oh well, Shadow should none the less be a good time and my body is ready.

Pour one out for missile boobs.

 

Karkashan

Married to Chrom
I have done it. I have beaten the final boss in Monster Hunter: World (PC) and now have no reason to ever play the game again ...pfffh haha no I'm still gonna play this game a shit ton, but I did beat the final boss of story mode and saw the end credits.

And despite my fears (and constant backups of my save data) I didn't have any problems with the final cutscene locking my save in an endless loop like some users have reported.

I've come around to World. I mean, I've always been enjoying it from the start, but the nitpicks I have with it aren't as major in my eyes anymore, now that I've gone through it. Will I probably enjoy MHGU more? Well, yeah, there's more variety and more people I know are gonna play it. But I do feel this was a needed step forward to get the devs out of the realm of PS2 level hardware.
 

Shoulder

Your Resident Beardy Bear
For the first time ever, I played, and finished System Shock 2 (Steam).

What a very interesting, and sometimes frustrating ride it was. All the games that I had previously played, such as Deus Ex, Dead Space, BioShock, and others, they all take influence, both directly, and indirectly from the System Shock franchise, and it's quite clear how ahead of its time this game was, especially in 1999.

Again, there were a few times when the game is quite brutal in how it wants the player to discover on their own, and while it may be the norm at times to do a Google search to find an answer, it feels like completing a difficult puzzle when you are able to figure something out, especially when there was no fast travel. You sort of have to know where things are as there is backtracking, but unlike some games, the backtracking is minimal at best, except for moments when you might need an important item. Memorization is something I encountered a lot just from understanding where I needed to go, despite the use of the Map in the game.

I wouldn't call this a top 10 game for me, but it is definitely one of the most influential games I've played in recent years, and it's refreshing to take a trip down memory lane, and play something that is almost 20 years old, and not only still feel relevant in today's gaming, but also is still ahead of the curve in some respects. I feel some games-especially ones that pride on exploration, have become a bit on the easy side, and focus more on eye candy, rather than atmosphere, and immersion. There are some games of today that revert back to those elements, but largely, I feel most games have forgotten what it means to be immersive. In today's gaming, immersion appears to be more about the graphics, rather than how the gameplay and atmosphere pull you in, rather than relying on the next generation of Ray-Tracing, or volumetric effects to get the point across. System Shock was made during a time when games could not rely as much on that, so designers had to become creative to make you feel like you were trapped in this world, and surrounded by creatures that made you fear for your life. I feel BioShock, a spiritual successor to System Shock, captured the bulk of that, and I look forward to finishing up BioShock 2, and play Infinite after that at some point.

I'll admit, from a survival horror perspective, it is a bit tame compared to games of today, and I hardly ever jumped, or had a "HOLY CRAP" moment, but there were plenty of moments where it was incredibly eerily, especially when you weren't sure if you were going to make it out alive or not.
 
For the first time ever, I played, and finished System Shock 2 (Steam).

What a very interesting, and sometimes frustrating ride it was. All the games that I had previously played, such as Deus Ex, Dead Space, BioShock, and others, they all take influence, both directly, and indirectly from the System Shock franchise, and it's quite clear how ahead of its time this game was, especially in 1999.

Again, there were a few times when the game is quite brutal in how it wants the player to discover on their own, and while it may be the norm at times to do a Google search to find an answer, it feels like completing a difficult puzzle when you are able to figure something out, especially when there was no fast travel. You sort of have to know where things are as there is backtracking, but unlike some games, the backtracking is minimal at best, except for moments when you might need an important item. Memorization is something I encountered a lot just from understanding where I needed to go, despite the use of the Map in the game.

I wouldn't call this a top 10 game for me, but it is definitely one of the most influential games I've played in recent years, and it's refreshing to take a trip down memory lane, and play something that is almost 20 years old, and not only still feel relevant in today's gaming, but also is still ahead of the curve in some respects. I feel some games-especially ones that pride on exploration, have become a bit on the easy side, and focus more on eye candy, rather than atmosphere, and immersion. There are some games of today that revert back to those elements, but largely, I feel most games have forgotten what it means to be immersive. In today's gaming, immersion appears to be more about the graphics, rather than how the gameplay and atmosphere pull you in, rather than relying on the next generation of Ray-Tracing, or volumetric effects to get the point across. System Shock was made during a time when games could not rely as much on that, so designers had to become creative to make you feel like you were trapped in this world, and surrounded by creatures that made you fear for your life. I feel BioShock, a spiritual successor to System Shock, captured the bulk of that, and I look forward to finishing up BioShock 2, and play Infinite after that at some point.

I'll admit, from a survival horror perspective, it is a bit tame compared to games of today, and I hardly ever jumped, or had a "HOLY CRAP" moment, but there were plenty of moments where it was incredibly eerily, especially when you weren't sure if you were going to make it out alive or not.
Have you played the original System Shock? I loved both of them, they're some of the most satisfying games I ever played.
 

Karkashan

Married to Chrom
Felt like dealing with the jank boss design in AM2R - Another Metroid 2 Remake (Fangame) again and finished up my latest replay of that excellent (albeit heavily flawed) fangame.
 

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
Metroid Prime Trilogy (Wii U)

When I last replayed these games in 2010, I already thought that Echoes was underrated and in some ways better than Prime 1. Now I think it is absolutely better than Prime 1. In fact, Corruption is also better than Prime 1, and may be the best in the trilogy.

The thing about the first Prime that is sticking with me the most is how small the map actually is. Tallon IV once felt massive to me, but now it feels like a series of mid-sized rooms connected by narrow corridors. The bosses are scarce, and it doesn't help that two of the big bosses are essentially giant humanoids. The artifact hunt in the last stretch only highlights what a small game this is, with most of the artifacts found behind single-room puzzles as an excuse to send you backtracking through the entire game world once more. Prime aged finely, but not 16-years-finely.

Echoes is an improved game right from the start. All the way to the end of the first major area, the map is fun to explore, and meaningful item upgrades come more quickly. It's only in the Torvus Bog that the hunt for the temple keys to access the boss area becomes a pain, especially because moving between the Light and Dark world of Aether becomes more cumbersome. Still, the upgrades and the big bosses are a good payoff, and if it weren't for a few obscure key and upgrade locations, Echoes would have been an excellent game from beginning to end.

Corruption is just fun to play, through and through. The combat is vastly improved because of hypermode and the lore is more varied and interesting. The level design is much prettier and open, too - there are hardly any generic corridors, with most small rooms still having at least something that makes them unique. The biggest flaw of Corruption is that it's much more linear than the previous games, and the game sins when it sends you back to earlier planets to seek upgrades; Even though the Aurora Unit has the courtesy of telling you roughly where you need to go, the actual travel there is a tedious straight line. This is where doubts set in for me: do I enjoy the game more because it's more immediately fun to play? Or is meaningful exploration ultimately what makes a game stand the test of time? For now, I know that I played all of Corruption more quickly than either Prime 1 or Echoes.

I feel like the best is yet to come in Prime 4. All the developers have to do to make a good game is follow the progression of the series: improved combat, larger areas, more varied bosses, and better upgrades. If they nail the open and connected level design of Echoes, they'll have made a great game. If they go beyond the call and implement new ideas such as the chemistry and physics engine of Breath of the Wild - imagine interacting with the world and its creatures by using the different beams - and they'll have a contender for the best game on the Nintendo Switch.
 
Nine Parchments (NS)
Bayonetta (NS)
Bayonetta 2 (NS)

Bayonetta games are soo cool. I would say I enjoyed playing the second game more, and that is very likely because I used amiibos to unlock a shitload of costumes and money so I was able to play through it all studded out with all the moves and accessories I needed to make that a fun experience. The first game is just much harder without them. Mechanically Bayo 2 is the much better game, but 1 has a better story and pace to it. Hopefully 3 is the best of both worlds.

Nine Parchments is fucking hard. A lot more fun in multiplayer, as most things are, but I beat it soloand didn't hate myself for it.

I'll probably go back to both later and 100%/Platinum them
 

mattavelle1

Crunk Ain’t Dead!!!
Moderator
Hollow Knight Nintendo Switch
44 hours and 76% completion

I really don’t know how to put into words all the ways I feel about this game. It has everything I want in an adventure game like this. Unbelievably huge map all filled with unique creatures and area design. An art style that speaks to me as an artist. A story that is mysterious and silent but you always feel like the farther you travel the more messed up things that will happen, and that’s true of this game. And a no hand holding BOTW gameplay in a vast 2D labyrinth.

For myself personally this is my #1 all time fav “MetroidVania”. It’s a 10/10 and will go into the top 10 of my all time fav adventure 2D game.
 
Typing of the Dead (PC)
Typing of the Dead 2 (PC)

which TECHNICALLY clears me from House of the Dead 2 and 3 respectively, but I digress.
Very short games. Typing1/HotD2 is particularly easy, though I did use an item on the final boss to make it loads easier. One thing that bugged me in the game is that I think I got a european version or maybe the base game is just like that, as much of the words were relevant to british sensibilities and pretty much every other word had an unnecessary U added in. Very bad. Also bad? The voice acting, jeezus thats some classically horrendous stuff.
I dont even want to decipher the story.
I fucking rock at typing though

OR SO I THOUGHT
Typing of the Dead 2 is entirely in Japanese, as far as I know, its the only version I could find. Well, not entirely, the voice acting is still in English, and I would say its acted better but the written dialogue and nonsense story is somehow worse.
Words will pop up that are in Japanese but thankfully they are somewhat romanized below, so I just had to follow that along in order to get by. Took a while to get used to. Overall you need much better speed in order to get through on normal, I assume the japanese are just really fucking good at typing.

I eventually ran into a big problem during the final boss of the game. In the first game, there was a boss that could only be damaged if you answered its question correctly by typing out the right answer. The final boss of this game has the exact same gimmick, only this time the questions and answers are in Japanese. So it took me an extra hour to just get past that boss fight. I thought I would be able to translate the questions and answers using my google app, but the pause button doesnt keep the letters on screen and the time limit just isnt enough to translate and type. So I just winged it until I eventually got through the volley and into the final throes. Felt good, and revived my interest in actually learning Japanese. Maybe.

I will likely buy Typing of the Dead: Overkill with the Swear Word dictionary DLC. Might as well.
 

SkywardCrowbar

Twintelle's loyal Husbando
Metroid Prime 2: Echoes (GCN)


Partially amazing, partially frustrating. The core gameplay and atmosphere is absolutely incredible, and the game holds up visually extremely well.

9/10.

EDIT: Upon further contemplation, I give it a 9. Some incredibly frustrating parts however.
 
Last edited:

EvilTw1n

Even my henchmen think I'm crazy.
Moderator
Hollow Knight Nintendo Switch
44 hours and 76% completion

I really don’t know how to put into words all the ways I feel about this game. It has everything I want in an adventure game like this. Unbelievably huge map all filled with unique creatures and area design. An art style that speaks to me as an artist. A story that is mysterious and silent but you always feel like the farther you travel the more messed up things that will happen, and that’s true of this game. And a no hand holding BOTW gameplay in a vast 2D labyrinth.

For myself personally this is my #1 all time fav “MetroidVania”. It’s a 10/10 and will go into the top 10 of my all time fav adventure 2D game.
I've tried to be reserved in my praise for Hollow Knight, but I'm really happy you enjoyed it, too.

(And you're right about the kinda-BotW sorta set up. "Here's the world. Have a good time." That's for the better in 95% of the game, IMO.)
Metroid Prime 2: Echoes (GCN)


Partially amazing, partially frustrating.

8/10.
I'm gonna have to get on Trilogy. I wanna see if I still hold an opinion like yours on Echoes (I think the overture is the best thing Retro ever did, and the rest of the game is OK), or if I come around to @Juegos point of view on it.
 

EvilTw1n

Even my henchmen think I'm crazy.
Moderator
Okami (NS)

About 48 hours total for me, but if you don't bother with the monster lists or grinding for XP, you could probably knock this out in 30. And you'd be an idiot for doing so, because why on Earth would you spend less time in this game?

I had played this on Wii, beat Orochi, got to the bridge by the capital, and...stopped. It was probably too close to me playing Twilight Princess; I was enjoying Okami, but felt no compelling reason to finish it.

This time? I bought it, thought I'd put in a couple hours, then come back to it. But the game got its hooks in me deep. Nearly 50-hours deep.

Complaints? The pacing could use work. It has the sort of 3-hour prologue people used to complain about in Zelda. Pop-in is hilarious. The camera is very 2006. And there is an issue with either the frame pacing or motion blur; DF said the game is a locked 30, but it doesn't feel like that while walking and running through a big field.

Otherwise? Quite close to perfect. Okami is the best-looking game of the year everytime it is re-released. I had never played it with the heavy paper filter, and holy shit is it great. I always really enjoyed the cel shading, but with the heavy filter, it adds so much texture to the simple geometry that it almost feels like cheating.

I never played it with DA controls, either, but they're surprisingly competent (the combat pacing is just more methodical). Gyro is better. Touchscreen in handheld is...OK, but useless. Sometimes you need to jump, set the screen, then hit the trigger for the brush, so the idea of touching the screen being the trigger is less than ideal. So is balancing the Switch with one hand (although no bigs if you're sitting on a couch or bed). Game looks absolutely incredible in handheld, though.

Overall? Repo talked to me awhile ago about how, in its day (before rigid genre classifications), the original Zelda had obvious RPG elements. Okami is like "what if we kept that flavor more obviously in Zelda?" The floating enemy encounters triggering a fight, banking XP to spend it on what attributes you want to buff, the diet weapon crafting, etc. No wonder people adore this game.
 

Karkashan

Married to Chrom

I finished up my latest playthrough of Resident Evil HD (PC) tonight. There is just something about the over complicatedness of the mansion that I really love. Time wise, I eeked out a completion time of just under 7 hours, but then again I wasn't in any great hurry, either.

Biggest time sink was just the mansion in general, as I can never remember where I'm supposed to go or when. My run of the Residence went pretty smooth except I went in a big, pointless circle in the Aqua Ring before I realized that I needed a key to proceed. The labs went close to perfect for me. (also, to note: My only death was to one of the courtyard boulders. However there were two instances (counting that death) that I had to retread ground, because the executable crashed when I was alt tabbing back into the game after looking up some information. ..putting me back in exactly the same spot that dying had, unfortunately)

There's a part of me that wants to play it again immediately and see if I can do better, and there's another part of me that would rather play another game.
 
Last edited:
Shadow of the Tomb Raider* (PS4)
Uncharted 4 (PS4)

Yeah I've beaten this thing twice. I had a great time with it on my first playthrough. I 100%'d it so that involved doing all the optional tombs and side quests, and finding all the Ubisoft-tier collectibles. I don't mind the documents in this game because it actually fleshed out some story elements, but there was a ton of, let's be honest here, pointless collectibles and inventory caches. I did it all because I have a hard time ignoring progress bars/icons on the map in these types of games which is why I choose to not play a lot of them.

I'm conflicted on the fact that the best tombs/crypts are optional. On the one hand they're some of if not the best moments in the entire game and they can be bypassed, on the other, they certainly reward exploring. Out of the entire reboot trilogy this is easily the most "Tomb Raider" as 2013 is mostly combat, Rise improved the side content but Shadow has a more tombs in the main campaign and less combat. The most enjoyment came from the optional tombs and exploring the world finding them. On my second playthrough I just did the main path and some side missions for XP and ignored the tombs, and it was still a fun romp but not near as rewarding. This really is a game that makes exploring the environments on your own time essentially mandatory if you want maximum enjoyment.

While thinking about this conundrum of whether or not having your best content optional I got to thinking about Uncharted. It's no secret Uncharted and the reboot Tomb Raiders share mechanics and whatnot, but I wondered if Shadow was a linear game, with all the optional tombs integrated into the main story and threw away most of the pointless collectibles, would I enjoy it more. So I did a playthrough of Uncharted 4.

It was refreshing to play. No skills, no side missions, no open world cliches, just have fun with the main campaign. It was still a fun time even though I've played it before. I do like my linear games I can just jump into, but apart of me does think Tomb Raider being more open world-ish is a good call in a way, well the reboots anyway. I do miss the level by level style of the older games where a level was freely explorable looking for keys and the way forward but in this era of old franchises going more open I guess rewarding the player with more of what makes the franchise shine is a good thing. Breath of the Wild had essentially 120 optional shrines that were great and people loved that game.

So after rambling about shit that no one cares about, I'm very happy with Shadow of the Tomb Raider. Which is nice since the game will probably sell like shit in Square Enix's eyes and will be put on the shelf indefinitely like Deus Ex or just let go like Hitman.
 

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
Out of the entire reboot trilogy this is easily the most "Tomb Raider" as 2013 is mostly combat, Rise improved the side content but Shadow has a more tombs in the main campaign and less combat. The most enjoyment came from the optional tombs and exploring the world finding them.
This kind of sells me on the game. I was not all that into Tomb Raider 2013, but I did enjoy the tombs and what little platforming was in there. It's good to know that this one is more of what I liked and less of what I didn't.
 
This kind of sells me on the game. I was not all that into Tomb Raider 2013, but I did enjoy the tombs and what little platforming was in there. It's good to know that this one is more of what I liked and less of what I didn't.
It doesn't seem to be getting a lot of love but the Tomb Raider reddit seems to be loving it. Have you played Rise? It's structured pretty similarly. You have some hub areas with optional Tombs that chime and have a message pop up saying "nearby tomb" that I wish I could turn off, and then you have those linear zones too. To me, Shadow is a better Rise.
 

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
It doesn't seem to be getting a lot of love but the Tomb Raider reddit seems to be loving it. Have you played Rise? It's structured pretty similarly. You have some hub areas with optional Tombs that chime and have a message pop up saying "nearby tomb" that I wish I could turn off, and then you have those linear zones too. To me, Shadow is a better Rise.
I haven't played Rise. I think I'll play Shadow first and see how I feel about it.
 

Karkashan

Married to Chrom
I just wrapped up Xenoblade Chronicles 2: Torna The Golden Country (NS) . Maxed out the affinity charts, did all side quests, beat all original playthrough superbosses.

This was a good game. A really, really good game. Not as long as XC2 proper, but I did get a good 35ish or so hours of enjoyment out of it (my play counter said 40 but there were a few really long idle times that I had when I was eating dinner some nights).

Did I cry at the end? Yes.

But more importantly, did I really, really enjoy it? Hell yes.
 
Okami (NS)
Took me quite a while to let this sink in. I cant add much that hasnt been already said. Just for me, though, this game is a fucking classic, and is in my top 3 games ever made fucking ever. There's just a lot of good with this game, the writing, the characters, the combat, the story, the graphics, the music, oh man its pretty much perfect in my heart.
I dont cry at the end of games, but I've welled up maybe 3 or 4 times. Okami got me super super close to actually tearing up, the closest ever, I had to look away from the screen. Just that final, anime-cliche filled moment in the last boss fight. At that point you've just fallen in love with the the whole game and seeing it all build up and climatically end is just a heartbreaker.
You can tell when a game is really something special when you have a deep, sinking, existential hole in your soul after beating it. Took me a long time to recover but yeah, I love this game.

Thimbleweed Park (NS)
Very good, very funny and actually fun to play classic adventure game. Its very well-written with some great voice acting and fun puzzles, some of which are your classic "this aint gonna work oh wait it did I'm a fucking genius" logic. It unfortuneatly shits the bed at the end. The final 2, maybe 3, parts where the story begins to unravel could have been fun, but ended up feeling very lazy and rushed. It also ended without closing up a lot of plot threads that were far more interesting than the unfortunate, overplayed, meta-direction they went. I'd still give it like an 8, just dont play it to completion.
 

BobSilencieux

Well-Known Member
Picross S2 - NS

I somehow managed to play this picross game for over 60 hours. But then, I have played every picross game I've ever seen so... yeah, obviously I can't get enough of that number-crunching-block-filling goodness.
 

SkywardCrowbar

Twintelle's loyal Husbando
Mario Tennis Aces (NS)

The Adventure Mode was mostly fun, but had difficulty curve issues. I found the final boss to be far easier than a lot of the random courses in Adventure Mode.

Multiplayer is great though; my fiancee and I are having a blast playing together.

8/10.
 
Castlevania: Circle of the Moon (Wii U)

Still love it even if the fight with Dracula is hard and boring at the same time. What I love about it is how too the point it all feels. No upside castle, no level select screen, just you and the map with a simple but fun card system. That said, a store wouldn't go amiss even if it would make the game a bit easier I guess.

Thinking of giving OoE another go, but I gotta get Dark Cloud done and maybe some horror games.
 

Karkashan

Married to Chrom
I just beat Mega Man 11 (NS) Did my usual bog standard Normal mode playthrough, no hard mode, no going for the insane achievements, etc.

My gosh this game is just... a whole mess of fun. Like, no joke, I truly do think this game is going to dethrone whatever Mega Man game was people's favorite (or at the least, what they think is the best).
 
Warhammer 40k: Space Marine (PC)

Look at these images





Warhammer! I absolutely adore the lore (and memes) of Warhammer and Warhammer 40k. They're a blend of serious, dark, stupid and sarcastic that works so well with me. This game is third person shooter set in the 40k universe. I got it free from Humble Bundle a while ago and its worth the $0 I spent on it, maybe not the $30 its going for on Steam (its a pretty old game but it holds up well for the most part). Its got some things going for it that differentiate it from the obvious comparisons to Gears of War. It has a fun little melee, hack n slash, combat mixed in with the shooting, along with a variety of different melee weapons and absurdly named guns that are fun to shoot. There's a DOOM-like (2016) execution system. Some sections will equip you with a rocket pack, allowing you to meteor smash groups of enemies. And also theres just a ton of enemies on screen at many points in the game, it feels like a musou sometimes. Enemies are probably my biggest issue with the game. There's not a whole lot of variety in the beginning, well, maybe 50% of the game. You're mostly mowing down greenskinned Orks, which have different attributes that make your approach to them different but are mostly just bullet sponges. The game finally introduces some otherworldly space horror demons and Chaos corruption into the mix to change things up during the final half. There are maybe 2 boss fights in the whole game, nothing to interesting but they both end pretty hilariously.

Overall though, its pretty generic despite efforts to make things fresher. It doesnt overstay its welcome thankfully, I beat it in around 9 hours and that was good enough for me. Enjoyed the sprint.

It has made me interested in some of the other Warhammer games out there. I probably wont buy any of the Diablo/RTS type games or the one that is pretty much a re-skinned Civilization, but theres some pretty good looking stuff besides that. Vermintide series is pretty well-praised and if the price drops I think it would be cool to get a few people to go through it
 

EvilTw1n

Even my henchmen think I'm crazy.
Moderator
Xenoblade Chronicles 2 - Torna: The Golden Country (NS)

35 hours. Beat every sidequest except for the green barrels. Completed probably 75% of affinity charts (about two away each from maxing out Jin, Mythra, and Brighid). Might be 10 or so characters left to find/talk with to get the final community level up, and there are some named monsters to go hunt, although I don't think I'll go mess with Hurricane Anise (I'm at level 61; I don't even know where I'd go grind for another 30-40 levels to be on equal footing).

They really nailed pacing on this. ...kinda too well. Part of the fun of an RPG is getting yourself into trouble. When you first visit new areas, sure, you'll find some bosses above your level, but it doesn't take very long to get up to their level and then have no challenge. Maybe it's because I did a lot of exploring and in the process did a lot of fighting, but I never felt like I had to grind because I was under-leveled. The named monsters are all clearly marked, optional, and only exist for completionists. Still, hard to argue with the result when the story pacing works this well because of it.

Combat is damn good. I pretty much played XBC2 focusing on elemental blade combos; all of the rest of the depth there felt like a happy accident. It's much more cohesive in Torna. You're rewarded for focusing on driver combos early in a battle, and then you manage elemental strikes for your blade combos (which aren't tied to specific elements this time, just having a I - II - III charge-up order). If they could patch this system into XBC2, I'd replay it immediately.

The story is pretty good, but it does feel like there were some missed opportunities. Lora is a fantastic protagonist, but how Jin ends up was a bit too Revenge of the Sith. There needed to be some wind up here, or more story to feed it along. Somewhere, someone at Monolith has a stand-alone game for Jin. One that hopefully sheds more light on Amalthus, too. It was nice to get more on Mythra, though.

This game is another titan away from being GOTY-caliber. It needed one extra place to go explore, and one other act in the story. Without them, it does feel more expansion-y than full game-y. This was the first Aegis War, and there was more I wanted to know about it.

As a whole, though? As the final piece of XBC2? Whew. Monolith's ambitions really are something.
 
Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask 3D (3DS)

Still a contender for my favorite game? Yeah I think so. Honestly at this point I've beaten so many games in my life I think it's impossible to pick a definitive favorite. Either way, I haven't played this one in ages and I still loved it. Got all the heart pieces, filled out the bomber's notebook and got all the masks. I absolutely love the side questing in this game and how this time through I learned things I didn't know before such as what a character does at a certain time of day if you do another thing a day previous. It's so well layed out.

That said, the remake makes a few changes I'm not that big on. Controlling the Zora in water was a bit more awkward and Twinmould was a chore in this version. I think the positives outway the negatives though in terms of alterations. The notebook is better and even though it's "just" 3DS it's a beautiful game.

Good shit.
 

SkywardCrowbar

Twintelle's loyal Husbando
Luigi's Mansion (GCN)

The visuals impress even in 2018 and the game is loaded with charm and has great attention to detail. It's a flawed gem. I wish I could rate it higher, but the controls are awkward and it's ultimately not long enough and has no extra content.

8/10.
 

EvilTw1n

Even my henchmen think I'm crazy.
Moderator
Hyper Light Drifter (NS)

I suppose this game never could live up to the trailer.


C'mon. How do you top that? Indies have been on the "retro-pixel" aesthetic for longer than I can remember. This is one of the only games that takes that aesthetic and does something interesting with it. It's kind of amazing how much mood can be set with an eerie synth soundtrack and a neon color palette. Layer that over the sparseness of NES/SNES sprites, and you can imagine the world's details for yourself. A lot of developers say that's what they want to do with a retro presentation, to let you fill in the world by yourself, but this one actually does it.

Story? You can fill it in for yourself. There is no text dialog. Nothing is spoken. There are visual clues here and there for how certain NPCs ended up where they have, but it's left up to you to figure out how the world ended up like this. I was going to write an article on comparing this to 2001: A Space Odyssey, but the next time I picked up the game, the Monoliths showed up. A bit too on the nose, I guess. Like 2001, you could wax philosophical on this for days. But also like 2001, I'm pretty sure the creator knows what this means. So like Kubrick's rationale, I'm guessing the crass explanation for HLD is the correct one.
You can apparently decipher the writing on some of the monoliths. Yup, it's all pretty much what you think it is.

The gameplay is polluted with the modern "git gud" / Souls sensibility. There are sections that are difficult for the sake of pissing you off. I turned it back to easy, and the game is still cheap here and there. That's partially due to the controls; everything is just a hair too slow and creaky. Remember how awesome A Link Between Worlds felt? Yeah, this is nothing like that. The walk speed even feels off, like it's quicker to walk up the screen than across it. The combat steadfastly refuses to be as smooth and satisfying as it looks in videos. Sure, it looks arcade-y, but it's actually quite methodical. Three-hit combo, dodge to a safe space, heal or shoot, dodge, start over. Once you get into a rhythm, it does begin to make a bit of sense, though.

Mainly because the combat fits in with the overall aesthetic. This is a rough game. But it's rough on purpose, like making an absinthe cocktail. It's supposed to look garish in some areas; the combat is supposed to feel like there's some rust on your sword. This isn't a game you play as much as a game you feel.

But even though I grok that the feel and style of the Hyper Light Drifter is on purpose, I don't think that makes it a better game, overall. Really, its main problem is that ALBW exists and already did the whole "update a 2D / isometric Zelda adventure." You aren't going to out-polish Nintendo, so what can you do? Make it rougher. If Nintendo is a classical symphony, Heart Machine is a punk band. And I really do admire them for that.
 
Last edited:
Ys 2 (PC)

I finished Ys 1 last year or the year before and I tried 2 but gave up part way through. I guess it wasn't a good idea to play them back to back even though story wise they are essentially one package. After talking to a friend about the franchise a few weeks ago I decided to give the game another chance, and bah gawd I loved it. My problem was how the world was structured compared to the first one but I must have been severely dumb back in the dark ages of 2016-2017. Basically, the first game was a small-ish map that made backtracking very easy and pain free, while 2 felt like it was more linear but you kept getting farther and farther away from the starting village which meant you had to go through more areas if you wanted to backtrack, but you get a spell that teleports you to any village at any time so yeah, big derp on my behalf.

I find the story pretty interesting as well and the back story of Ys itself.

The sprite work is simply amazing.

Also the fucking music. The fucking music. This is the starting area


The starting area
 
Forgot to add Castlevania: Lords of Shadow 2 (PS3)

I'm pretty mixed on this one. Combat was good but the enemies annoyed me. What I like about Metroidvanias or action games is when you become more powerful throughout the game lower level enemies become more trivial. That doesn't really happen here. End game backtracking still had some enemies blocking my heavy attacks then immediately transitioning into an unblockable attack themselves. Also, I kinda laugh at how the point of the game is to become as strong as you once were to fight Satan, yet besides learning new moves with your weapons, all you learn is a double jump and becoming mist. It's not a big problem gameplay wise I admit, just silly.

The stealth sections weren't good either.

I want to like this game, I enjoyed the environments and making shortcuts to previous areas that connected together, but the enemies were annoying after awhile and I wasn't that interested in the plot.
 
The Mummy Demastered (PS4)

I love it. I talked a bit about in in the JC chat but it's great. It doesn't change Metroidvanias and was probably overshadowed by the almost over-saturation of the genre at this point but it's just a well put together game. The "mac and cheese" of Metroidvanias if you well (quote from ET). Plus the soundtrack is fantastic, always a plus.

Mega Man Zero (DS)

This is such a weird game. I cant remember a game that is so difficult yet so easy at the same time. Starting off is a bit hard like most Mega Man games, and I died mostly from the small field of view. ''Protect the factory'' can go fuck itself because you need to collect bombs, some of which are over a bottomless pit that you traverse by floating platforms. The problem? Once you get the bombs the platforms are too low to see once you have to jump back down. I legit had to figure out how long it takes for each platform to be in the same position as the previous one and count 3 seconds just to do it, and I still died a lot.

You get 4 weapons and 3 elemental chips and while the Rod and Buster can be fun, the bosses fall apart once you get a spinning jump slash and the correct element. One boss is simply weak to the rod. The levels themselves aren't any too outrageous either except for the second last one - jumping up a tower full of spikes i.e. the "we're running out of time" mentality of Mega Man games.

The other issue is instead of picking a level from the typical select screen you have to talk to someone at home base who has a mission. Only some missions are available at a time. If you run out of lives you "fail" the mission and it's gone for good. You don't get the reward of beating the boss unless you reload your previous save file. Lives also don't refill so for awhile I had 0 lives going into new stages. But once I started grinding for weapon levels and whatnot, I maxed out on lives and never game overed after.

Even for the last boss I didn't need to use a subtank. I died a few times because there are pillars above a bottomless pit you need to wall jump off to reach him, and he has a move that simply holds you in place, so I died a couple of times. Also his hit box is weird, but once I figure out the pattern I beat both forms no sweat.

I'm sure if I let some missions fail and didn't get upgrades that game would be waaaaaay harder, but instead you get this weird mish-mash of easy and hard.

If you're still reading this you're awesome and have a nice day.
 

Koenig

The Architect
...Is it possible to complete a Monster Hunter game? Ive completed the single player, high rank single player, multiplayer, and G rank multiplayer, but I don't feel like I can even pretend I have "completed" it.
 
Top