What's the Future of Gaming?

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
#1
I've wanted to start this thread since I finished Breath of the Wild, but I was waiting for everyone else to get to the point where they're mostly done with the game before I did that.

The point of this thread is to discuss exactly what it says on the title: What is the future of Gaming? There are so many directions that this thread could go in, and I will allow all of them. Whether you think the future of gaming lies in a new type of control, a more powerful system, more portability, VR or AR, or other technology applications, I hope you will share your thoughts and have an open mind to others' thoughts.

I will come back later with my own thoughtful wall of text (as I originally intended).
 

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
#2
In the meantime, here's a video that inspired me to start this thread immediately: Overwatch being played with a retinal tracking device.


In other words, imagine a tiny Wiimote, or a gyroscope sensor, in your pupil. I think if and when we get to large-scale FPS games that can run on smart glasses, this sort of technology will make a lot of sense when combined with other gestures so that an external controller isn't needed. Maybe this wouldn't work for games with complex controls, but I think there are a lot of simple games that would work without a hitch with nothing but eye tracking and touch technology, or eye tracking and hand gestures, or even eye tracking alone.
 

Goodtwin

Well-Known Member
#3
I don't think we will see a drastic departure from games as we know them. I think as long time gamers we start to forget that games aren't really targeting a consumer who has played games for 30+ years. It doesn't matter that you played 2D platformers 25 years ago, they are brand new to younger gamers. What I am getting as is the expectation that games need to constantly evolve is narcissistic way of looking at things. Why? Because you as a long time gamer aren't the center of the universe. The what is old is new again will apply in this market just like any other. We will see a cycle of trends as we grow older. Gaming concepts to continue to evolve and new ideas will be created, but I think the idea that somehow a total reinvention of how we interact with games will change drastically isn't likely. Holding a controller and playing a game just works. Just like playing cards haven't changed much over the year, videogames will hold a similar stance. We will see novelty diversions like Wii with motion controls and more recently VR, but I don't see these changing the way we game for the long term.

Switch is more of a look into the future than VR in my opinion. A big box under your tv will seem as outdated as a wired phone on the wall one day.
 

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
#4
So the reason I decided to make this thread initially was because of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. When I was a kid playing games like A Link to the Past and Super Metroid, I would fantasize about things that would be cool as hell. "Imagine if you could have a world that was like, so huge, and had like a hundred dungeons in it, and that you could send bombs flying at the enemies, but they were really smart and could pick up the bombs too, but you could set them on fire, and then like froze them and electrocuted them, or you could like get on a horse and shoot arrows from it, but the enemies could get on horse too, and you had like these big battles on horseback, and, and, and...." Then comes Breath of the Wild, and it's actually pretty much that game that I had convinced myself was just a silly fantasy.

So it made me think: what is, today, the cool stuff that sounds like it's just a silly fantasy? Because in 20 years, we might actually get it. Like @Goodtwin, I don't think it's VR. Even if VR were to blow up overnight, I wouldn't care too much because I've never really seen the appeal of it. I don't think I ever played a game like Dark Souls, or even Breath of the Wild now, and thought: "you know what would make this game even better? VR." That's not to say that I couldn't be convinced, but I think VR has a tough road ahead when it comes to convincing people years down the line that it's a worthy investment.

If I were to talk about a concept that is truly fantastical (today) in gaming, it would be the application of machine learning (modern AI programming) in video games. Without getting too much into it, I think in the future we could see games that in some ways learn from us and use that to the game's advantage. As a reasonable example, think of the Korok seeds in Breath of the Wild. These seeds are in fixed points around the world, hidden under specific environmental puzzles. No matter how you play the game, the way in which these seeds are discovered is pretty much the same. But what if the game was actually keeping track of how you played it, and determined that, for instance, Juegos really likes to burn bushes and climb to the top of mountains. So then, the game decides to start procedurally placing new bushes on the tops of mountains and hiding Korok seeds under them, knowing fully well that I'm going to go burn them and discover them. In the same way, enemies in the game could learn from previous encounters with every blood moon that revives them. Knowing that Juegos is a tricky dick that likes to freeze and then shock them for easy kills, silver Moblins would then start carrying torches and sticking by their campfire next time they see me. There are already some systems like this in some games (Shadow of Mordor has a hierarchy of commanders that remember the player's tendencies), but I'm imagining machine learning algorithms becoming common enough to not be just a one-off feature in games, but affecting multiple aspects of it, from combat, puzzles, procedural dungeons, equipment, and so on.

As a crazier example, imagine a game where the NPCs are so good at recognizing the players actions, and reacting to them, that they are almost lifelike. this kind of machine learning wouldn't have to happen during the game, but rather be a part of its development. You could program the AI of an NPC (like Zelda), or an enemy (like the lynels), or an animal (such as a horse) to be ready to categorize player actions; feed thousands of hours of playtesting to the AI; and program responses for the NPC (or enemy, or animal) that are triggered when it recognizes the player's action. Characters in Breath of the Wild are already very detailed in their animations and their reactions to their world and the player's actions, but deeper machine learning technology could them look like puppets in comparison.

But to be clear, I think this sort of thing is far in the future, in terms of gaming years. Like I said, Breath of the Wild is the game I would dream about as a kid, and 20 years later, it's here. So I don't think this wacky deep machine learning stuff I'm imagining today is too crazy for us to get in some shape or in another 20 years, either.
 

EvilTw1n

Even my henchmen think I'm crazy.
Moderator
#5
As a crazier example, imagine a game where the NPCs are so good at recognizing the players actions, and reacting to them, that they are almost lifelike. this kind of machine learning wouldn't have to happen during the game, but rather be a part of its development. You could program the AI of an NPC (like Zelda), or an enemy (like the lynels), or an animal (such as a horse) to be ready to categorize player actions; feed thousands of hours of playtesting to the AI; and program responses for the NPC (or enemy, or animal) that are triggered when it recognizes the player's action. Characters in Breath of the Wild are already very detailed in their animations and their reactions to their world and the player's actions, but deeper machine learning technology could them look like puppets in comparison.
This is the sort of thing I think could be potentially worrying, tbh, if you were to extrapolate it out to its conclusion. It's way, way, way, way far off, but if you could make a videogame AI so good that it's basically Westworld on a disc (sort of the AI equivalent of proceeding through the uncanny valley), you would potentially create some morality problems. Right now people have no problem offing a hooker in GTA with like three AI scripts that regenerates after a day/night cycle, or stomping a goomba that has one script (walk toward player) and reappears when the level is restarted. But if the NPC is an AI orders of magnitude more complex, an AI that is aware of its existence but doesn't know it's in a simulation, then what? Again, I don't think it's something to worry about in my lifetime. It would also require a complete rethinking of how games are designed, because right now games are pretty well designed around enemy AI being simple enough to be fun for the player. But it's something I think about, and something the future of games (hopefully the far off future) will have to think about.
 

Goodtwin

Well-Known Member
#6
The problem with making the AI really smart is that it will frusterate a ton of players. Not everyone has great problem solving skills.

I think gaming concepts that are revolutionary are rarely evolutionary. Think about what Nintendo did with Zelda Link Between Worlds. Really clever gameplay mechanic that didn't rely on newer better hardware. Those are the real gems, concepts that do not rely on new tech to make them great.

Sent from my SM-G360V using Tapatalk
 
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theMightyME

Owner of The Total Screen
#7
the far future fantasy is full dive vr... nothing like the vr we have now, but where you basically jack in and your body is essentially asleep while your mind plays the game...

think sword art online... only less murdery
 

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
#8
The problem with making the AI really smart is that it will frusterate a ton of players. Not everyone has great problem solving skills.
I think that, like Mike said, this sort of application requires rethinking how games are designed. That is not to say that all game design will change (I'm sure the equivalent of Super Mario Bros will still sell tens of millions in the future), but we've seen gaming branch out into very different types of experiences already. Pokemon Go is the kind of game we never expected to have in our Game Boys, and companies use Alternate Reality Games to keep fans engaged with their brands outside of the weekly tv show episodes, or as a marketing campaign leading up to a movie's release, for example. So I think there's room for a "Westworld" type of game outside of the traditional "solve puzzles and defeat Ganon" design. It could just be dating sims, or Harvest Moon, but with really damn good AI. Or it could just be Tetris Battle with a simulated rival that learns along with you, but keeps its challenge at your level. I think there are a lot of interesting applications.
 

mattavelle1

IT’S GOT A DEATH RAY!
Moderator
#9
Im hoping for much more control and gameplay freedom like what was introduced to us in BotW. Really I hope the future of gamin for Nintendo means continuing to take the kid gloves off with us older gamers and let us "play" games with even more gameplay freedom.

I will post more but this is a very basic answer for a very complex idea in gameplay to explain.
 

Odo

Well-Known Member
#10
Going from the open world games (open world games were an evolution in my opinion) I hope the worlds will become more and more alive, specially among the NPCs. I hope finding more ways to make real unchangeable consequences in those worlds too, for example, in a city in a GTA game, I'd like to explode a bridge and face all the consequences of that and see all the changes in the city and in the NPCs.
 
#12
Hopefully better gameplay in games.
For the past 2 decades, alot of games moreso AAA games, have been mediocre as heck with crappy gameplay, but yet they sell well due to hype, semi realistic graphics, and trend. Hopefully that sillyness stops. Nintendo seems to be one of the few game companies, that makes high quality games with good gameplay. Hopefully they improve and extend on what they have done already gameplay wise, and continue to do so as the months go by.
 
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