What's Your Favorite Game and Why? (Front Page Article)

Cyan

Well-Known Member
#58
Okay, I got it!

My favorite game is MegaMan Battle Network 3 (Blue)! the Battle Network series is what actually really got me into MegaMan, so that's a huge thing because MegaMan has actually been a big influence on my life. The third one was the pinical of the series, and had what basically amounts to a new game after the credits roll. The battle system is THE BEST BATTLE SYSTEM IN RPG HISTORY, and even influences my games today. the art is fantastic, the stories are fun, and the music is amazing.

Now for what you really want to know, why Blue? Is it cause of my name? No, Blue version actually IS better (Just like Pokemon) because you get the Shadow Style, and the Giga Chip Folder Back, which replenishes ALL your chips in your folder, and can be reused and reused. Oh yeahhhhhhhhhh~

Oh, and by the way: http://www.destructoid.com/capcom-confirms-gba-games-coming-to-wii-u-273826.phtml
YAY!

Edit: Please let me know how I can improve this post before friday. I want it to look great for front page.
 

theMightyME

Owner of The Total Screen
#59
I am going to cheat a bit here. For the record the game I consider to be the greatest of all time is Super Metroid, but at opportunities like this I cannot resist the opportunity to recommend a lesser known title. So, for the purposes of this article, my favorite game is Shadow Hearts: Covenant. I got into Japanese Role Playing Games (JRPGs) in the very late 90s with Final Fantasy III (which is Final Fantasy 6 in Japan) when a friend of mine encouraged me to push myself past my discomfort. Ever since it has been my favorite genre of games. Unfortunately, as a Nintendo fan, I chose exactly the wrong moment to fall in love with that genre. Soon after my amazing discovery of my new favorite genre, a massive 3rd party exodus hit Nintendo’s upcoming console. For the first time, I became a multiplatform gamer.


The same friend convinced me years later to give a little known game called “Shadow Hearts” a shot. I found the game exceptionally broken, and yet I completely fell into the story and characters. After trudging through that rough game, my friend smiled at me and handed me its sequel. I would like to think that at that moment he said something dramatic like “and here is your payoff”, but honestly I don’t remember our exact conversation. Shadow Hearts: Covenant quickly became one of my favorite games, and entered a 3 way tie as my favorite JRPG of all time (alongside Final Fantasy 6, and Xenogears).


So what makes Shadow Hearts: Covenant great? So many things to say, but lets start with the setting. Unlike most JRPGs which take place in some European fantasy world or neon anime scifi universe, the Shadow Hearts series takes place on earth, around the time of World War 1. In Shadow Hearts: Covenant you travel through Europe, Russia, and Japan, encountering fictionalized historical figures such as Rasputin and Roger Bacon. But this isn’t realism either, this world has a Lovecraftian evil lurking in the background, references to the magic of King Solomon, and a family of Vampires that make individual appearances across the franchise.


Lets us move on to combat. In Shadow Hearts, the turn based combat is based on a ring and dial and requires timing like Paper Mario. However, Shadow Hearts takes it further. In Shadow Hearts Covenant you can customize your ring, and adjust the size and number of strike areas. Beyond that, you can equip characters with charts that act like a more advanced version of the materia system from Final Fantasy 7 or the Magicite system of Final Fantasy 6. Your chart can adjust damage, defense, and even add traits like poison to your attacks. Items used in combat play with the theme as well. Some items will give you multiple spins on your ring but will hide your strike areas from you or make the ring spin faster. The combat is deep and vastly customizable.


Another facet that I love about the Shadow Hearts series is the way you gain new abilities (and at times weapons). Rather than just gaining all of your abilities as you level up, Shadow Hearts brings abilities into the story in a way that is reminiscent of Final Fantasy 6. Your main character Yuri can transform into demons you can customize your demons and enhance them with points you gain in combat and even learn entirely new demon forms by tracking down demons and defeating them in side quests. There is a wolf character in your party that learns new abilities by fighting other wolves found throughout the game’s world, all with back stories and often hilarious dialog. Another character uses a puppet and different abilities are tied to outfits you dress your puppet in. You gain these outfits by trading for them, by trading what is essentially gay softporn that you find in dungeons with 2 traveling merchants you see everywhere in the game.


The music in Shadow Hearts is amazing as well, grabbing influences from Russia, and the Middle East gives the music of the series a distinctive and original sound. Composers for the game include Yoshinori Mitsuda (Chrono Trigger, Xeno series), and Kenji Ito (SaGa series and

Puzzle and Dragons). But with music we should really let the songs speak for themselves





With all of that going for the title it may come as a surprise that my favorite part about the game is that it is a direct sequel. Beyond just being rare in a JRPG, Shadow Hearts: Covenant mastered the art of continuing a story within a new game. The original Shadow Hearts had 2 primary endings, a good ending, and a bad ending. In Shadow Hearts Covenant you pick up the pieces from the bad ending, and in doing so the game delves into loss and grief in a way rarely seen in games, and most certainly ahead of its time. Some of the best moments in the game are simple introspective conversations within dreams about regrets. Even the final villain of the game is a character who upon a similar loss takes a different route to find his solution. You do not need to play Shadow Hearts in order to enjoy its sequel, but I recommend trudging through the broken predecessor anyways, if only to heighten the emotion of the second game.


To wrap up, I would like to point out that there are actually 4 titles in the Shadow Hearts series. A 3rd game titles “Shadow Hearts: From the New World” is a less interesting but even more polished continuation to the primary events of the first 2 games. But there is another entry to the series that actually came first, a survival horror/rpg hybrid for the Playstation called Koudelka. The 3 main Shadow Hearts games are on the Playstation 2. The first 2 were published by Midway in the states, while the 3rd was handled by XSEED. The Developer of the series (Nautilus) no longer exists, though much of the talent transferred over to FeelPlus (not to be mistaken for Good Feel) where they developed Lost Odyssey alongside Mistwalker. FeelPlus was later absorbed by its parent company AQ Interactive.
 

Tucker

“Do you happen to know how to fly this thing?”
#60
Oh man. I so want to get in on this, but I really can't narrow it down and pick one to write about. It'll always be wrong somehow.
 

TheAmazingLSB

PLEASE UNDERSTAND....
#62
I am going to cheat a bit here. For the record the game I consider to be the greatest of all time is Super Metroid, but at opportunities like this I cannot resist the opportunity to recommend a lesser known title. So, for the purposes of this article, my favorite game is Shadow Hearts: Covenant. I got into Japanese Role Playing Games (JRPGs) in the very late 90s with Final Fantasy III (which is Final Fantasy 6 in Japan) when a friend of mine encouraged me to push myself past my discomfort. Ever since it has been my favorite genre of games. Unfortunately, as a Nintendo fan, I chose exactly the wrong moment to fall in love with that genre. Soon after my amazing discovery of my new favorite genre, a massive 3rd party exodus hit Nintendo’s upcoming console. For the first time, I became a multiplatform gamer.


The same friend convinced me years later to give a little known game called “Shadow Hearts” a shot. I found the game exceptionally broken, and yet I completely fell into the story and characters. After trudging through that rough game, my friend smiled at me and handed me its sequel. I would like to think that at that moment he said something dramatic like “and here is your payoff”, but honestly I don’t remember our exact conversation. Shadow Hearts: Covenant quickly became one of my favorite games, and entered a 3 way tie as my favorite JRPG of all time (alongside Final Fantasy 6, and Xenogears).


So what makes Shadow Hearts: Covenant great? So many things to say, but lets start with the setting. Unlike most JRPGs which take place in some European fantasy world or neon anime scifi universe, the Shadow Hearts series takes place on earth, around the time of World War 1. In Shadow Hearts: Covenant you travel through Europe, Russia, and Japan, encountering fictionalized historical figures such as Rasputin and Roger Bacon. But this isn’t realism either, this world has a Lovecraftian evil lurking in the background, references to the magic of King Solomon, and a family of Vampires that make individual appearances across the franchise.


Lets us move on to combat. In Shadow Hearts, the turn based combat is based on a ring and dial and requires timing like Paper Mario. However, Shadow Hearts takes it further. In Shadow Hearts Covenant you can customize your ring, and adjust the size and number of strike areas. Beyond that, you can equip characters with charts that act like a more advanced version of the materia system from Final Fantasy 7 or the Magicite system of Final Fantasy 6. Your chart can adjust damage, defense, and even add traits like poison to your attacks. Items used in combat play with the theme as well. Some items will give you multiple spins on your ring but will hide your strike areas from you or make the ring spin faster. The combat is deep and vastly customizable.


Another facet that I love about the Shadow Hearts series is the way you gain new abilities (and at times weapons). Rather than just gaining all of your abilities as you level up, Shadow Hearts brings abilities into the story in a way that is reminiscent of Final Fantasy 6. Your main character Yuri can transform into demons you can customize your demons and enhance them with points you gain in combat and even learn entirely new demon forms by tracking down demons and defeating them in side quests. There is a wolf character in your party that learns new abilities by fighting other wolves found throughout the game’s world, all with back stories and often hilarious dialog. Another character uses a puppet and different abilities are tied to outfits you dress your puppet in. You gain these outfits by trading for them, by trading what is essentially gay softporn that you find in dungeons with 2 traveling merchants you see everywhere in the game.


The music in Shadow Hearts is amazing as well, grabbing influences from Russia, and the Middle East gives the music of the series a distinctive and original sound. Composers for the game include Yoshinori Mitsuda (Chrono Trigger, Xeno series), and Kenji Ito (SaGa series and

Puzzle and Dragons). But with music we should really let the songs speak for themselves





With all of that going for the title it may come as a surprise that my favorite part about the game is that it is a direct sequel. Beyond just being rare in a JRPG, Shadow Hearts: Covenant mastered the art of continuing a story within a new game. The original Shadow Hearts had 2 primary endings, a good ending, and a bad ending. In Shadow Hearts Covenant you pick up the pieces from the bad ending, and in doing so the game delves into loss and grief in a way rarely seen in games, and most certainly ahead of its time. Some of the best moments in the game are simple introspective conversations within dreams about regrets. Even the final villain of the game is a character who upon a similar loss takes a different route to find his solution. You do not need to play Shadow Hearts in order to enjoy its sequel, but I recommend trudging through the broken predecessor anyways, if only to heighten the emotion of the second game.


To wrap up, I would like to point out that there are actually 4 titles in the Shadow Hearts series. A 3rd game titles “Shadow Hearts: From the New World” is a less interesting but even more polished continuation to the primary events of the first 2 games. But there is another entry to the series that actually came first, a survival horror/rpg hybrid for the Playstation called Koudelka. The 3 main Shadow Hearts games are on the Playstation 2. The first 2 were published by Midway in the states, while the 3rd was handled by XSEED. The Developer of the series (Nautilus) no longer exists, though much of the talent transferred over to FeelPlus (not to be mistaken for Good Feel) where they developed Lost Odyssey alongside Mistwalker. FeelPlus was later absorbed by its parent company AQ Interactive.
 

mattavelle1

IT’S GOT A DEATH RAY!
Moderator
#64
awesome work to everyone!!!

Here in a few days I may lock this thread. If you didn't get a chance to see the article, well
Go to the front page cause it's up and it's awesome!

Thank you all again, and thank you CoV for formatting and making it all happen. :mthumb:
 
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