Yo-Kai Watch

Odo

Well-Known Member
#1
So, who's going to get into it?

Who's tried it out? Nobody?

Where are your pure and young Japanese monster collecting souls?

Is TNE gonna review it?



All right, I've just tried out the demo and the battle system is super fun and refreshing!

The monsters battle 3 vs. 3 and you just acts "coaching" them during the battle. You can do stylus mini-games to do a special move or to "heal" them or you can just take some of them out of the battle. You need to decide things fast, use your stylus all the time. It feels like those original stylus games that we got back in the old DS days.

This is the most original monster collecting RPG I've seen in years. Graphics are brilliant, 3D is all right, more than 200 monsters to get, lots of things to do, battle system is fast, fun and will make you sweat.

Now I get why this got so popular in Japan. It may get bigger here if kids try it and Nintendo do the proper marketing.

I may pick it up soon to play between my XCX long sessions.
 

EthanGK

The blunder from down under
#2
I'll probably get it when it hits stores here or some time after. I really do love these kinds of games.
 

Odo

Well-Known Member
#3
It's a great first-impression review from Nintendo Life:


Lens Mode lets you slide a special magnifying glass around the top screen using the touchscreen, as in the 3DS Layton titles, which will reveal hidden Yo-Kai if you pass it over them.

Sometimes they'll be sitting in place, but often they'll be moving around - and if they're on the move, you'll need to keep the lens trained on them for a few seconds before they're full revealed.

While it draws superficial comparisons to Pokémon thanks to its monster collecting ('befriending', in this case) and combat, Yo-Kai Watch's real-time battle system really sets it apart, and we absolutely loved it - it's fast-paced, interactive, and incredibly engaging.

You'll field all six Yo-Kai on your team at once, using a wheel system. Your Yo-Kai are arranged in a circle on your watch, and moving this circle (by physically spinning it on the touchscreen) will change up the formation
- the three Yo-Kai up front will be actively engaged in battle, while the three Yo-Kai in the back part of the circle will be off the field.

Crucially, you can spin the wheel around whenever you like, so all your monsters are immediately accessible whenever you want them, and you don't have to wait for any 'turns' to pass to change things up.


Your up-front Yo-Kai will act automatically at regular intervals, using whatever move they see fit in a given moment - attacking, healing, or buffing your party - but you can also get them to perform 'Soultimate' attacks on command.

Soultimates are powerful moves unique to each Yo-Kai, and come with awesome animations, from screen-sweeping tsunamis and rockslides to full-party heals and more.


Pulling them off is more involved than simply choosing a menu command, too - after tapping on a Yo-Kai and selecting Soultimate, you'll have to succeed at a rapid-fire, Wario Ware-style microgame. These range from tapping moving targets or tracing out simple shapes to spinning an Ouendan-style wheel; they're also randomized each time, so you won't know what's coming before you begin.

And if you're worried about the combat being too easy, fear not; our Nintendo rep pointed us towards a hidden boss in the demo that offered up a massively challenging - and seriously satisfying - fight. While we could mostly rely on auto-attacks and a few Soultimates to take out the early enemies in the demo, we had to pull out all the stops to come out on top here.

Quick-spinning the wheel to shift damage away from fragile monsters, constantly healing and Purifying the back row, timing our Soultimates to avoid long gaps between attacks, and using elemental advantages were the only way we made it through - and then only on our second try.
The tougher fight also demonstrated just how important team composition is in Yo-Kai Watch - thanks to the circular wheel setup, it's not just who's on your team that counts, but where they are in the loop.

In addition to the detail and sense of scale, Yo-Kai Watch impressed us with a polished presentation throughout. The graphics were beautiful, cast in a calm, colourful aesthetic that reminded us of Inazuma Eleven, and the soundtrack - we put in headphones to enjoy it - was light and catchy.

http://www.nintendolife.com/news/2015/06/first_impressions_getting_into_the_spirit_with_yo-kai_watch
 

Odo

Well-Known Member
#4

You need to take care of a lot of things

- There are the types of yo-kai you set to battle
- The order of them on the wheel, since you can't change the party position during the battle
- The target is also interactive, you need to tell your party who they should prioritise
- To use purify command, you need to put them back. The purify requires a mini game.
- The special attacks called soultimate requires a mini game too.
- You need to wait until the soultimate attack recharge.
- There are the items too.

The battle is real-time and the mini-games creates a good sense of urgency. Also they make you focus only on the move. So, if you make too many soultimate moves you spend them too fast and can't check what's going on with the battle and how your targets behave.
 

Odo

Well-Known Member
#6
This video from GameExplay has a lot of useful info too. Including yo-kai fusions. The town looks great.

 

Odo

Well-Known Member
#7
It's important to know that this game doesn't deliver trading options yet. Trading comes with YW2.
 

Odo

Well-Known Member
#8
I'll probably get it when it hits stores here or some time after. I really do love these kinds of games.
I think the battle system has me sold.

Thanks for hipping me to the game, @Odo.
Guys, I've got 7 hours into it and it's better than it looks.

Some stuff that makes this game incredible:

- To befriend a yokai isn't plain simple like throwing a pokeball. There are several things to consider. The yokai you've got on your party (their charm or the lack of it). The place (of course), the time and the food the yokai like. So you've got to throw food at him, however there are several types of food, so you've got to keep lots of kinds of food with you to be ready to catch a yokai.

However, since you aways fight against 3, you need to target before throwing food and it can be hard if your yokai is too strong and just kill the poor thing before you try to get it.

Also it's not 100% sure. You may throw food but the yokai can ignore it. If it's not enough, there are levels of food too. Meaning a hamburger is cheaper than a cheeseburger. So the latter is more effective for yokai who likes burgers.

You can get yo-kai on a machine where you use your 3DS step coins too. It's sorta random but you can't ignore it.


- There are a few yokai that evolve. Most of them you catch from fusion. It's harder than evolve but also more fun, since you need to catch and fuse 2 yokais in order to catch that stronger yokai that you want. It's less boring than train a yokai for hours and hours like you need to do in pokemon to evolve.


- The battles have many levels of strategy. You can read and watch everything on youtube, but there are nice stuff that you'll only find out when you play. For example, a soultimate (the special attack that you command) needs some time to refil, however this time includes walking time. So if you uses all the soultimates you've got, on the next battle you'll have nothing to attack on the next battle.

Some yo-kai don't have soultimates to hit your foe and it's not like pokemon where you always have this kind of attack to use. Some soultimates only have status attacks. So you need to be careful about using them on your party.


- So many quests and they're fun to accomplish. They're not repetitive.


- If you don't use the target, your yo-kai will attack radomly, so you need to use it wisely, because big bosses have weak spots to target and also there are stuff that shows up on the battle and you need to target them to get. You can find heal items for example. Sometimes you're doing a minigame to charge an attack and something shows up. It's super crazy!



- The map is based on memorising. It's said on the internet that the map sucks because you get lost too easy. It's not really true. The map doesn't show names, so you need to memorise where the shops are, where the fish seler is, where they sell burgers, where's the guy who buys bugs, etc. You need to memorise it, but it's not hard, in fact, it's cool. Because it's your town and you need to know where the things are and you'll know it if you do the quests, if you hunt bugs and yokais. I was lost in my town, but now it's my town and I know where everything is.


- The game has a world so real and full of details. Every house you get in is complete. You'll find bedrooms, furniture and even house's bathroom. So full of details and the graphics are perfect. There's a perfect Japanese school in the game! So detailed! Every classroom, the library, the lab, etc. Level 5 nailed it.

Nintendo needs to pay attention to this game. For a monster collecting game, it's a gem. I can see why this game took over Japan. It's a solid game with a lot of content.
 

EthanGK

The blunder from down under
#9
Guys, I've got 7 hours into it and it's better than it looks.

Some stuff that makes this game incredible:

- To befriend a yokai isn't plain simple like throwing a pokeball. There are several things to consider. The yokai you've got on your party (their charm or the lack of it). The place (of course), the time and the food the yokai like. So you've got to throw food at him, however there are several types of food, so you've got to keep lots of kinds of food with you to be ready to catch a yokai.

However, since you aways fight against 3, you need to target before throwing food and it can be hard if your yokai is too strong and just kill the poor thing before you try to get it.

Also it's not 100% sure. You may throw food but the yokai can ignore it. If it's not enough, there are levels of food too. Meaning a hamburger is cheaper than a cheeseburger. So the latter is more effective for yokai who likes burgers.

You can get yo-kai on a machine where you use your 3DS step coins too. It's sorta random but you can't ignore it.


- There are a few yokai that evolve. Most of them you catch from fusion. It's harder than evolve but also more fun, since you need to catch and fuse 2 yokais in order to catch that stronger yokai that you want. It's less boring than train a yokai for hours and hours like you need to do in pokemon to evolve.


- The battles have many levels of strategy. You can read and watch everything on youtube, but there are nice stuff that you'll only find out when you play. For example, a soultimate (the special attack that you command) needs some time to refil, however this time includes walking time. So if you uses all the soultimates you've got, on the next battle you'll have nothing to attack on the next battle.

Some yo-kai don't have soultimates to hit your foe and it's not like pokemon where you always have this kind of attack to use. Some soultimates only have status attacks. So you need to be careful about using them on your party.


- So many quests and they're fun to accomplish. They're not repetitive.


- If you don't use the target, your yo-kai will attack radomly, so you need to use it wisely, because big bosses have weak spots to target and also there are stuff that shows up on the battle and you need to target them to get. You can find heal items for example. Sometimes you're doing a minigame to charge an attack and something shows up. It's super crazy!



- The map is based on memorising. It's said on the internet that the map sucks because you get lost too easy. It's not really true. The map doesn't show names, so you need to memorise where the shops are, where the fish seler is, where they sell burgers, where's the guy who buys bugs, etc. You need to memorise it, but it's not hard, in fact, it's cool. Because it's your town and you need to know where the things are and you'll know it if you do the quests, if you hunt bugs and yokais. I was lost in my town, but now it's my town and I know where everything is.


- The game has a world so real and full of details. Every house you get in is complete. You'll find bedrooms, furniture and even house's bathroom. So full of details and the graphics are perfect. There's a perfect Japanese school in the game! So detailed! Every classroom, the library, the lab, etc. Level 5 nailed it.

Nintendo needs to pay attention to this game. For a monster collecting game, it's a gem. I can see why this game took over Japan. It's a solid game with a lot of content.
Looks like this just became a priority instead of an eventuality :) Thanks!
 

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
#10
- The map is based on memorising. It's said on the internet that the map sucks because you get lost too easy. It's not really true. The map doesn't show names, so you need to memorise where the shops are, where the fish seler is, where they sell burgers, where's the guy who buys bugs, etc. You need to memorise it, but it's not hard, in fact, it's cool. Because it's your town and you need to know where the things are and you'll know it if you do the quests, if you hunt bugs and yokais. I was lost in my town, but now it's my town and I know where everything is.
I really like it when games do this. It requires the town to be well designed to pull it off, but then it's really satisfying to have gotten to know it well enough that you can find everything you need and go wherever you need to go.
 

Odo

Well-Known Member
#11
I really like it when games do this. It requires the town to be well designed to pull it off, but then it's really satisfying to have gotten to know it well enough that you can find everything you need and go wherever you need to go.
It's is satisfying and the map is well done.

Besides, the game has a system of day and night. So every day starts a new chapter from you home. Since you need to be ready with your items and the food you need to catch yokais, so the first natural thing that you think about when you leave your house is to go shopping.

So everyday, I go shop for meat, fish, breads, items. I go to the bug shop and sell/trade the bugs I got yesterday. I also on my way to the shops I catch more bugs on the streets, try to get the yokais I haven't yet, and get some cokes on the machines on the street. I talk to people and they say different stuff sometimes! They have troubles and favours for me. I also can go to the bank and to the mail to do some stuff. Then I'm ready to fulfil my quest.

Knowing the map is a natural thing in this game.
 
Last edited:

Juegos

All mods go to heaven.
Moderator
#12
It's is satisfying and the map is well done.

Besides, the game has a system of day and night. So every day starts a new chapter from you home. Since you need to be ready with your items and the food you need to catch yokais, so the first natural thing that you think about when you leave your house is to go shopping.

So everyday, I go shop for meat, fish, breads, items. I go to the bug shop and sell/trade the bugs I got yesterday. I also on my way to the shops I catch more bugs on the streets, try to get the yokais I haven't yet, and get some cokes on the machines on the street. I talk to people and they say different stuff sometimes! They have troubles and favours for me. I also can go to the bank and to the mail to do some stuff. Then I'm ready to fulfil my quest.

Knowing the map is a natural thing in this game.
That's how it was in Fantasy Life as well, if I recall. I don't remember having a map, rather I remember having to figure out where everything in the town was. I'd have little routines built in from that, I'd know to go to the street market to buy vegetables and proteins and then go to the restaurant to practice cooking and improve my cooking skill, then sell all the food for profit. I'd have a different routing for the other professions, and they all involved going to different parts of town to buy resources and putting them to use.
 

EvilTw1n

Even my henchmen think I'm crazy.
Moderator
#13
So I finally got around to trying out the demo, and @Odo is absolutely right - this game is a gem. Super fun, and the charm factor is through the damn roof. Yes, it may appeal to kids, but some of the quips let you know that this isn't a game for children only.

The visuals are perfectly tailored to the 3DS. The town looks decent, but the little touches (looking up a tree, checking below a vending machine, the attack screen and animations) are fabulous. There's a little Ghibli-esque charm at work.

And the battle system is even better than I thought. It's "real time" in the sense that there are auto-attacks and buffs, and you can switch your team up at will without waiting. But it's really a misnomer. You aren't in control of movememt or dodges. But more importantly, you'll be doing your main attacks with soultimates, and your main heals with cleanses. And those are done one at a time, in turns. It's like the most cleverly hidden turn-based system I've seen. It doesn't punish you or feel limiting because there's still a high degree of freedom.

I'm seriously buying this today.
 

Odo

Well-Known Member
#14
So I finally got around to trying out the demo, and @Odo is absolutely right - this game is a gem. Super fun, and the charm factor is through the damn roof. Yes, it may appeal to kids, but some of the quips let you know that this isn't a game for children only.

The visuals are perfectly tailored to the 3DS. The town looks decent, but the little touches (looking up a tree, checking below a vending machine, the attack screen and animations) are fabulous. There's a little Ghibli-esque charm at work.

And the battle system is even better than I thought. It's "real time" in the sense that there are auto-attacks and buffs, and you can switch your team up at will without waiting. But it's really a misnomer. You aren't in control of movememt or dodges. But more importantly, you'll be doing your main attacks with soultimates, and your main heals with cleanses. And those are done one at a time, in turns. It's like the most cleverly hidden turn-based system I've seen. It doesn't punish you or feel limiting because there's still a high degree of freedom.

I'm seriously buying this today.

I hit the 40h mark and I've got only 40% of the yokais and hundreds of quests to do. It's got a massive content. A lot of secrets, battles will get very challenging and you really need to build a good team.

This game is much better than the demo.
 

EthanGK

The blunder from down under
#15
I really love this game. It is a lot of fun and gives you tons of stuff you can do even if you only have about 10 minutes to play which is great for me. There's a lot of quirky and downright hilarious creatures in the game, and the game is remarkably self-aware with its sense of humour, with the main character calling out the some of the weirder plot points. Though some of the jokes are very strange post-translation, I think.

There are some annoying things going on for people who like to "catch 'em all" though. For instance, there are a lot of yokai that are identical but for having different colours. This is especially annoying when combined with the fact that there's no indication in a battle whether or not you have the medal for that monster yet or not. So it kinda leaves you paranoid when you encounter something; you have to check the medallium after the battle (pokedex for those who haven't played it) for its name to see whether you have it or not.
It's also annoying that nearly every time I fuse yokai it's something that you can find easily in the wild anyway. Not enough to deter me from trying to get and fuse all of them, though!
 

Odo

Well-Known Member
#16
There are some annoying things going on for people who like to "catch 'em all" though. For instance, there are a lot of yokai that are identical but for having different colours. This is especially annoying when combined with the fact that there's no indication in a battle whether or not you have the medal for that monster yet or not. So it kinda leaves you paranoid when you encounter something; you have to check the medallium after the battle (pokedex for those who haven't played it) for its name to see whether you have it or not.
It's also annoying that nearly every time I fuse yokai it's something that you can find easily in the wild anyway. Not enough to deter me from trying to get and fuse all of them, though!
This game is brilliant.

Yes, the lack of a medalion indentification is a serious problem, I hope they fix it on YW2. I had to make my own medalion on my iPad to check and mark my yokai.

The identical yokai with different colours and different names doesn't annoy me.

The fusing can give you some hard to find and hard do get yokai, but yes, most of them you can find in the wild. The fusion is useful for give you a strong yokai early in the game.
 

EthanGK

The blunder from down under
#17
This game is brilliant.

Yes, the lack of a medalion indentification is a serious problem, I hope they fix it on YW2. I had to make my own medalion on my iPad to check and mark my yokai.

The identical yokai with different colours and different names doesn't annoy me.

The fusing can give you some hard to find and hard do get yokai, but yes, most of them you can find in the wild. The fusion is useful for give you a strong yokai early in the game.
Yep, for a first installation in any series, this game is seriously great. I hope they took the feedback on this one into consideration when making the second one (which I believe is already out in Japan, right?).

I hope so, too with the medallion indication. I'm sure they will fix it. It was a bit of an odd oversight for a game that encourages you to collect something like 2oo critters, many of which look extremely similar and not help you keep track of it.
The personal medallion is a cool idea but shouldn't be necessary at all.

You didn't find it annoying spending time catching a bunch of identical things? Just seemed like a lazy attempt to increase the amount of yokai. I wouldn't care about similar-looking ones, but using the exact same model was just gross to me. One incident early in the game, I was playing it at the same time as a friend and showed him the Enefly (purple butterfly) in the woods, and then he said he got one too, but it was a different colour. Just thought it was a cool little detail, different coloured butterflies. Didn't realise until way later in the game that there were two identical yokai "Enefly" and "Enerfly" with different colours and very slightly different names.

Yeah the fusing was so exciting using it in the early game. I just wished they'd kept the fusion yokai a little more exclusive. I always check if my new yokai fuse when I get them and regret doing it a lot of the time.
 

Odo

Well-Known Member
#18
Yep, for a first installation in any series, this game is seriously great. I hope they took the feedback on this one into consideration when making the second one (which I believe is already out in Japan, right?).

I hope so, too with the medallion indication. I'm sure they will fix it. It was a bit of an odd oversight for a game that encourages you to collect something like 2oo critters, many of which look extremely similar and not help you keep track of it.
The personal medallion is a cool idea but shouldn't be necessary at all.

You didn't find it annoying spending time catching a bunch of identical things? Just seemed like a lazy attempt to increase the amount of yokai. I wouldn't care about similar-looking ones, but using the exact same model was just gross to me. One incident early in the game, I was playing it at the same time as a friend and showed him the Enefly (purple butterfly) in the woods, and then he said he got one too, but it was a different colour. Just thought it was a cool little detail, different coloured butterflies. Didn't realise until way later in the game that there were two identical yokai "Enefly" and "Enerfly" with different colours and very slightly different names.

Yeah the fusing was so exciting using it in the early game. I just wished they'd kept the fusion yokai a little more exclusive. I always check if my new yokai fuse when I get them and regret doing it a lot of the time.
Yeah, the Enefly and Enerfly situation is a joke in a quest where you've got to get one of them and your buttler confuses them. This confusion is in the lore of the game.

The similar yokai usually enjoy the same kind of food and has similar habilities and types. It's sort of lazy but I think, as they are "ghosts", that they're came from similar origins so they do similar stuff but aren't the same. I think this game made this also on purpose to make us confused. YW makes you memorise a lot of things and confuse about similar yokais is annoying but a bit fun when you memorise them. Being a YW master is a bit challenging than being a Pokemon master. In Pokémon, for example, you've got only the pokeball but in YW you've got to deal with foods. It's a little bit annoying but the greatball/masterball in Pokémon is quite boring too. Plus in Pokémon there are some Pokémon designs that are very silly. Anyway, I may just making up excuses because I like the lore of the game very much, sorry. :)

But I got you about the fusing. I ended up giving up fusing and I'll do that only when I stop getting yokai in the wild. I'll use the fuse to complete my medalion. Since I love doing sidequests, my yokais are overleveled and I don't need the stronger ones now for the story.
 

EthanGK

The blunder from down under
#19
Yeah, the Enefly and Enerfly situation is a joke in a quest where you've got to get one of them and your buttler confuses them. This confusion is in the lore of the game.

The similar yokai usually enjoy the same kind of food and has similar habilities and types. It's sort of lazy but I think, as they are "ghosts", that they're came from similar origins so they do similar stuff but aren't the same. I think this game made this also on purpose to make us confused. YW makes you memorise a lot of things and confuse about similar yokais is annoying but a bit fun when you memorise them. Being a YW master is a bit challenging than being a Pokemon master. In Pokémon, for example, you've got only the pokeball but in YW you've got to deal with foods. It's a little bit annoying but the greatball/masterball in Pokémon is quite boring too. Plus in Pokémon there are some Pokémon designs that are very silly. Anyway, I may just making up excuses because I like the lore of the game very much, sorry. :)

But I got you about the fusing. I ended up giving up fusing and I'll do that only when I stop getting yokai in the wild. I'll use the fuse to complete my medalion. Since I love doing sidequests, my yokais are overleveled and I don't need the stronger ones now for the story.
Haha I'm glad that the game is self-aware about its silly parts.

Yeah, I wouldn't mind it so much if they at least had slightly different models to reflect their differences. Like in Pokemon, Pidgey and Spearow are quite similar but they grow to reflect the differences between their origins and behaviour. It would be nice have Yokai at least have model differences that show what they're about.
I love the food system in YW. I think it's really fun figuring out and remembering what certain Yokai eat. That's one of the things that really separates this from Pokemon. Pokemon makes collecting each pokemon pretty straight-forward (though occasionally challenging), but offers complexity in the way each monster is used. Whereas with Yokai there is complexity in obtaining all of the monsters with more simplistic battle strategies.
I really love the design of a lot of the Yokai as well. Silly as some are, there are a lot of cool and hilarious ones too.

By the way is there any point to the dancing stars other than alternate victory poses? Because it seems a waste to use them on that when I'm just mashing buttons to skip the battle-end screen anyway hahah
 

Odo

Well-Known Member
#24
I've beaten it.

50h, 45% of medalium and 56 quests done.

I still have lots of quests to do and 55% of yokai to catch.

There's post game to complete too.
 
Top